46

You've asked several different questions, so here goes: How effective is it? It is a lot more effective in cameras that have it than those that don't. Not trying to be a smarty-pants, but since most manufacturers adopted automatic self cleaning systems, the number of complaints regarding dusty sensors went down by several orders of magnitude. See labnut's ...


17

You can absolutely clean the rear element as you've discussed - it's done exactly the same as the front element is cleaned. Caution must be used because if, for example, a piece of grit were on the rear element when you used your cloth, and you damaged the element's coating, the damage is far more likely to affect your image quality than it would be if you ...


14

I think the definitive article on the subject is "Cleaning your Sensor" by Thom Hogan, written by someone reputable with a lot of experience. I would disregard most scary personal anecdotes and product reviews by people who have given this one try, quite possibly misused the product, and then ranted about it. It is safe to clean your sensor yourself with ...


13

Solved. I accidentally placed the focusing screen by flipping it on other side which made in focus objects blurry. I corrected it and it's back to normal now.


12

Unless you are working in a NASA grade "clean" room, no matter what method you use you will almost never get every single dust spot. Even if you do, by the time you put a lens back on the camera, more dust has probably made its way into the mirror box of your camera and some of it may eventually find its way onto the surface of the filter stack in front of ...


11

I followed other's suggestions (wipedown, etc.). Additionally, I put it in a box with a small container of baking soda for a couple of days. Seemed to do the trick.


10

The residue left behind when your fingers touch the glass of your lens contains several organic and chemical compounds. Normal skin oil has a pH level of around 4 to 5.5, which is mildly acidic. The longer it is allowed to be in contact with materials reactive with acids, the more reaction will take place. And yes, acid will eat through the coatings on ...


9

When it is dirty, no more or less often than that. If you can't see any obvious dirt or fingerprints then don't touch the lens surface at all with anything. Every time you touch a lens element it's an opportunity for damage so it's not really worth it unless the dirt is visible in your output.


9

The lens cleaning pen isn't a single "you only need this" solution. Lens cleaning should ideally be handled in multiple steps: No-contact cleaning with a blower; I like Giottos rocket blowers. Minimal pressure, light contact cleaning, such as the brush in the lens pen. Dry contact cleaning, such as the lens pen. Wet cleaning solutions, such as methyl ...


9

Canon professional cleaning service. I have a 5d III and I wouldn't touch my sensor. My old 5d, sure. But $3k worth of camera? Nope!


8

Ever since I posted this question here, this has been featured on 2-3 websites: Nikon Rumors PetaPixel Although I'm not sure if this was a direct result of posting this question here. Nikon has now updated the support page and removed the statement where it said that breathing on the glass could damage the lens coatings due to presence of harmful acids in ...


8

Well, first I should mention that dust on the focusing screen has no effect on the image quality or the exposure metering, so for that sake there is no need to clean it. On the other hand the dust may get loose and get onto the sensor, so it's a good preventive measure tog get the worst dust away at least. To clean it, you should first turn the camera off, ...


8

I'm not entirely sure if @StanRogers answer covers it entirely so I'll add this. When you use compressed air canisters several things happen besides the blast of air which can (as Stan describes) remove things like the thin film coating. First, the gas, stored under pressure expands quickly, this gas expands because its heating up and has room (less ...


8

That really looks like sensor dust. Lots of it. The normal way to get rid of it is to use a purposefully designed cleaning solution and brush. Visible Dust makes the ones I use. You can try those, in case the cleaning you used was not good enough. The certain lighting conditions should not matter, only the aperture, because sensor dust is more visible at ...


8

As a collector of old and sometimes, very smelly cameras, I swear by general household kitchen white vinegar! Equal part vinegar and water, dampen a cloth, and scrub away! You will be surprised! You can also half fill a small desert bowl with white vinegar, and then place that inside a cardboard box on one side with your camera on the other and by morning,...


8

TLDR; Do this at your own risk! The compressed gas is formed from a liquid propellant in the canister which under certain conditions can spray all over your very delicate electronics leading to short-circuits which cause lots of damage up to and including fire if the battery is shorted. It will cool (possibly freeze) parts of your camera and that can lead to ...


8

I ran a few more tests. Here are the results: No change to sensor: f/2.8, 1/6", ISO 200 Blue specks (similar to the top speck in the sample pictures) f/10, 2.0", ISO 200 White specks (similar to the bottom speck in the sample pictures) Manual sensor cleaning: f/2.8, 1/6", ISO 200 Blue specks in the exact same location, but smaller f/10, 1.8", ISO ...


7

I would suggest taking your camera into a professional for camera cleaning. Who knows how serious the issue is - plus, I mean....termites...are you sure it isn't some other bug? Either way, I definitely wouldn't use any harsh chemicals or substances on my camera - I would rather spend a little money not to ruin such an expensive device...hence the advice to ...


7

This happened to me with the same exact lens, except I wasn't caving, a friend had borrowed the lens for some hurricane shooting. Got some salt water in, salt inside the lens. I had my shop take it in, all they did was send it to Canon. I believe it was about $150 and the lens came back perfect and quickly. I felt the need to do it soon since salt was ...


7

For fingerprints and light dust you can use a microfibre cloth. If you have stubborn dirt, dust (or glue!) then you may scratch the emulsion if you rub with a cloth. In that case you could try film emulsion cleaners, but I would just soak them in lukewarm water, perhaps with a single drop of dishwashing detergent to prevent streaking, then use a soft ...


6

That's a 'focusing screen'. You can easily obtain it either from the manufacturer directly, or from a camera store. For example from Adorama Typically, for one model of camera there will be a few types of focusing screens that work with it. Your camera's manual will tell you which one has been installed by default, and which ones you can substitute for ...


6

This is not a repair I would recommend trying for someone who is unfamiliar with camera repair. There's a lot of delicate work involved in getting the proper tools in and out of position to remove the focus screen in the 600D without damaging the mirror or external side of the focusing screen, both of which are very easy to scratch and damage. And anything ...


6

If it's only compressed air (and not compressed refrigerant that is used in typical "canned air" products), then ideally it is no different from using a rocket blower, other than different air velocities due to the pressure of the compressed air. EDIT: Practically, however, there are reasons to be concerned. Cheaper cans of compressed air are sometimes ...


6

Yes, it's possible — but it's more likely that that's just how it is. You can't expect miracles from a point and shoot camera, and fine detail with no noise when "pixel peeping" would be a miracle. You say that the results are satisfactory for viewing as a whole on a computer screen. They'll also be fine when printed at reasonable sizes. In any case, it's ...


6

Dirt can never cause grain. It's more likely you are seeing digital noise. Switching to lower ISO should help.


6

Just don't. The coating on the surface of your camera's mirror is the most fragile piece of your entire camera that is accessible without taking the camera apart, probably followed closely by the underside of the focusing screen located just above it. The mirror should never be touched on the surface. Unlike most mirrors in other applications that have the ...


6

Soak in a tray or tube of water at room temperature. Add two teaspoons of Dawn dishwashing detergent per quart (liter). Soak for several hours and test the paper to film adherence. If not free, continue soaking. In time the film will release from the paper. Now wash the film for 10 minutes in running water at room temperature, follow with a 30 second dip in ...


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