43

You've asked several different questions, so here goes: How effective is it? It is a lot more effective in cameras that have it than those that don't. Not trying to be a smarty-pants, but since most manufacturers adopted automatic self cleaning systems, the number of complaints regarding dusty sensors went down by several orders of magnitude. See labnut's ...


25

If acids in human's breath are enough to degrade Nikon lenses, I think that's the best argument yet for buying any other brand. I've been involved in photography for 27 years. This is the first I've ever heard of "harmful acids in breath" that could harm a lens. I don't believe I've been living under a rock. I could be wrong, and my lenses could be days ...


21

C is the correct answer. Well, actually it's A if you look at the sensor from the back, but my guess is that you will turn the camera around and access the sensor from the front. So it's C.


17

You can absolutely clean the rear element as you've discussed - it's done exactly the same as the front element is cleaned. Caution must be used because if, for example, a piece of grit were on the rear element when you used your cloth, and you damaged the element's coating, the damage is far more likely to affect your image quality than it would be if you ...


16

Don't use that lens because in that case, there will be chance that water enters in the camera body and make a fatal damage. Stop using it immediately to avoid short circuit and/or ruining your camera body (and ruining this lens permanently) Take it to a nearby camera service center. If you still have warranty, then better contact them first. Best of ...


16

I haven't done any analisys, but here is my take on this. There is no doubt that Nikon knows what they are talking about when it comes to lenses and lens care. However, in this case I suspect they are covering their butt. Unfortunately manufacturers are driven to do that more and more because every once in a while someone does something stupid, perhaps ...


14

Most cloths can be used actually without damaging the lens. However some may leave the lens with lint or fabric residue. The most important thing is that it must be completely clean and untreated by any chemicals. Cloths used in gloves or jackets often has water resistant coatings which may not be liked be the lens. The main reason for not using a sleeve is ...


13

A self cleaning sensor is never necessary but is always nice. At the end of this post I've described Checking for Sensor Dust. This is not wholly intuitive and this method may be of value to others. Dust will "pump" through many zoom lenses as they are zoomed in and out. internal volume increases or decreases and air is drawn in and expelled. Some are ...


13

Solved. I accidentally placed the focusing screen by flipping it on other side which made in focus objects blurry. I corrected it and it's back to normal now.


11

I think the definitive article on the subject is "Cleaning your Sensor" by Thom Hogan, written by someone reputable with a lot of experience. I would disregard most scary personal anecdotes and product reviews by people who have given this one try, quite possibly misused the product, and then ranted about it. It is safe to clean your sensor yourself with ...


11

I followed other's suggestions (wipedown, etc.). Additionally, I put it in a box with a small container of baking soda for a couple of days. Seemed to do the trick.


10

Hopefully you have wiped the stuff before turning the camera off, otherwise there is probably some of it inside it. There is nothing self-cleaning here and neither is this camera sealed against dust and particles from entering. It's a great camera you have, so I would bring it to Canon for a cleaning. They will take the camera apart and clean it. Here this ...


10

Washing it thoroughly in fresh water is better than doing nothing. I have "saved" a cellphone that was dropped in a bucket of concentrated water/chlorine solution and a radio pager that was dropped in salt water - in each case by very very very thorough washing in fresh cold water with no cleaning agents and long slow drying. A lens MAY respond to the same ...


10

Well, the viewfinder itself is not going to cause infections, but some of the germs that cause conjunctivitis are highly contagious. If you're passing your camera to people with red eye, ask them to wash their hands and to use the LCD screen instead. In general, though, these germs are not particularly long-lived away from a human host. Just letting the ...


10

The residue left behind when your fingers touch the glass of your lens contains several organic and chemical compounds. Normal skin oil has a pH level of around 4 to 5.5, which is mildly acidic. The longer it is allowed to be in contact with materials reactive with acids, the more reaction will take place. And yes, acid will eat through the coatings on ...


9

Yes grease and smudges can cause flare, but instead of well defined circles or lines you are more likely to get an overall clouding effect with a visible glow around highlights and lightsources. In fact it used to be a common technique with glamour and some portrait photographers to smear vaseline on a lens in order to get flattering (if cheesy) soft focus ...


9

When it is dirty, no more or less often than that. If you can't see any obvious dirt or fingerprints then don't touch the lens surface at all with anything. Every time you touch a lens element it's an opportunity for damage so it's not really worth it unless the dirt is visible in your output.


9

Canon professional cleaning service. I have a 5d III and I wouldn't touch my sensor. My old 5d, sure. But $3k worth of camera? Nope!


9

Unless you are working in a NASA grade "clean" room, no matter what method you use you will almost never get every single dust spot. Even if you do, by the time you put a lens back on the camera, more dust has probably made its way into the mirror box of your camera and some of it may eventually find its way onto the surface of the filter stack in front of ...


8

Ever since I posted this question here, this has been featured on 2-3 websites: Nikon Rumors PetaPixel Although I'm not sure if this was a direct result of posting this question here. Nikon has now updated the support page and removed the statement where it said that breathing on the glass could damage the lens coatings due to presence of harmful acids in ...


8

Well, first I should mention that dust on the focusing screen has no effect on the image quality or the exposure metering, so for that sake there is no need to clean it. On the other hand the dust may get loose and get onto the sensor, so it's a good preventive measure tog get the worst dust away at least. To clean it, you should first turn the camera off, ...


8

I'm not entirely sure if @StanRogers answer covers it entirely so I'll add this. When you use compressed air canisters several things happen besides the blast of air which can (as Stan describes) remove things like the thin film coating. First, the gas, stored under pressure expands quickly, this gas expands because its heating up and has room (less ...


8

That really looks like sensor dust. Lots of it. The normal way to get rid of it is to use a purposefully designed cleaning solution and brush. Visible Dust makes the ones I use. You can try those, in case the cleaning you used was not good enough. The certain lighting conditions should not matter, only the aperture, because sensor dust is more visible at ...


8

As a collector of old and sometimes, very smelly cameras, I swear by general household kitchen white vinegar! Equal part vinegar and water, dampen a cloth, and scrub away! You will be surprised! You can also half fill a small desert bowl with white vinegar, and then place that inside a cardboard box on one side with your camera on the other and by morning,...


8

TLDR; Do this at your own risk! The compressed gas is formed from a liquid propellant in the canister which under certain conditions can spray all over your very delicate electronics leading to short-circuits which cause lots of damage up to and including fire if the battery is shorted. It will cool (possibly freeze) parts of your camera and that can ...


7

The only course of action here is to get the lens professionally serviced. Once mould spores have got into your lens and started to grow like this there is no other way to get rid of them. In order to prevent this in the future always store your camera in a sealed bag with a couple of sachets of silica granules to absorb any moisture that may have got into ...


7

There are many nooks and crannies in a modern dslr mirror box to hold (and hide) dust. If it's just dust - not fluid - I use a strong blower (like the VisibleDust Hurricane Blower) with the body held lens mount down. As I compress the blower with a quick, strong squeeze, I quickly (but carefully) move the body up, away from the blower in as smooth a motion ...


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