Hot answers tagged

20

Ordinary household bleach will destroy the image. The image is contained within a thin layer of gelatin. Household bleach will separate (lift off) the emulsion from the film base thus destroying the images.


8

... a normal shredder for paper actually creates stripes so wide that each is like a complete picture itself ... Most of the shredders you buy for home use don't cut the mustard; you want one that produces small enough pieces that the images would be useless. There's a standard for that, called DIN 66399, that defines source materials, levels of security ...


6

If possible: move to digital My first thought is to move to digital: make digital scans or photos of your slides and use a digital projector and a laptop. One of the risks of a projector running 24x7 is overheating, with the possibility of a fire breaking out. Please be aware of that. Also take into account that you'll need to frequently change the light ...


5

Fast scanning + Accurate Colour Reproduction without having to post process + Even lighting of the image + $500 USD = :-) ...you must be dreaming, :-) depending of course on what you mean by 'speed' (the main problem) and 'accuracy'. The real option here is Imacon. You have some cheaper solutions in Ken Rockwell's How to Scan Your 3,000 Slide Archive . ...


4

You can find dedicated slide scannera for sale for less than the price of a lens. Then sell it after doing the project. Which means someone else thought of that first and you can find a gently used scanner on eBay discounted. If you recover most of the cost after the project, you can afford a very good one and end up being out $200 when you resell it.


4

A few things can cause this issue: Reversed slides: the image is on the emulsion side, and due to the thickness of the backing, will not be in the focal plane of the lens. Different slide mounts: some processors may use mounts of different thickness from others, so you may need to remount all in a uniform thickness, e.g. B&H slide mounts. Thermal ...


4

Inkjet printing is not an option due to the real-world resolution that could be achieved being very low (<300dpi) added to other optical and ink based fuzz/bleed/dirt etc. Pigment inks are also opaque. Laser printing is also not an option as the toner is opaque and suffers similar resolution limits. You have only 2 options that I can think of: 1 - Make ...


4

A kitchen blender or food processor would do a pretty good job at converting the film to dust. You might add a slice of bread, some dry beans, or some other dry material to keep things moving inside the container. Used blenders are available in thrift stores for just a dollar or two if you think you wouldn't want to use the appliance for food after blending ...


4

I don't think I've ever seen anything handheld that would work with a carousel; the whole affair would be kind of unwieldy. Kodak used to make a couple of Ektagraphic models, the 270 and 570, that do exactly what you're after. Both are cube-shaped (about a foot in each dimension) and are completely self-contained. I'd be very surprised if you couldn't ...


4

Standard 35mm full frame size was 24 x 36, which gives you the normal 3:2 format. If the 5:4 ish ones are a larger area than the normal 36x24mm slides, they may be transparencies from 127 film, which allowed images up to 40x40mm to be fitted in 2" x 2" slide mounts (the same size as 35mm film slides). These larger slides were known as "superslides" (see ...


4

The emulsion side of Kodachrome was coated with a clear protective lacquer. Perhaps it has oxidized. Additionally, this coat may attract dust and such as it can gain an electrostatic charge. Lacquer is used to protect the Kodachrome emulsion. Lacquer is made from “guncotton”. Ordinary cotton is treated with nitric acid and solvents to make lacquer. As time ...


3

The safest, simplest, and cheapest way of destroying the images is to drop the slide film into boiling water. The gelatine-bearing image layers will quickly melt, slide off the film base into a black gelatinous mass which you discard into normal household waste. The plastic (PET) can be put into solid industrial waste although it is recyclable. Without ...


3

All film expires. Unfortunately, film expiry dates are printed on the box (which has obviously been discarded in this case), not on the 135 film cartridge itself. Fujifilm Sensia was discontinued in 2010. Expiry dates would be in the range of 2-3 years after manufacture. Film should really be cold stored over longer periods, but it's entirely possible that ...


3

If I understand your question correctly you place 4 slides in a transparency adapter, enable Multi Crop and then Vuescan recognizes (erroneously) that you want to scan 8 slides. Subsequently it starts scanning all 8 regions where it thinks slides are present. To only scan the four slides follow these steps: Enable Batch Scan in the Input tab. Choose All in ...


3

The answer will be highly dependent on the specifics of the situation, such as how much heat and humidity, and over what period of time. It's unlikely that anyone will be able to provide an accurate answer for your situation because you very likely haven't recorded the temperature and humidity levels over the storage period, but "incredibly hot" can't be ...


3

Google search led me to the following expired service: http://www.domainvanhorn.com/viewer/ As written in the page information, there is a regular slide film in the contraption, which consists of a matte white screen and a single simple lens. This is a setup comparable of the most simple slide viewers which, for example, can be found here: https://www....


3

I scan negatives and slides to create RAW files. It is largely a matter of scanner resolution limits and software. I use an Epson V700 which has a transparency scanner, film holders and a selection of software. It also can scan natively to 6400 pixels per inch. The software I use is Silverfast and Vuescan. Scanning film at sufficient resolution can be a ...


3

Googling around, it looks like you might be thinking of a Sawyer Bi-Lens 35mm slide viewer. Some were stereoscopes, some weren't, and apparently, some came with a built-in light and some didn't. It looks like there are a number for sale on eBay and the like (mostly with the built-in light and not the diffusion panel on the back), but as these are '50s / '...


3

Put a gel filter over your flash. Golden or orange (especially the CTO) will be best. These filters are available from various manufacturers and holders are also available,if you desire one. There is a product from Rosco that includes variety of pre-cut filters for this purpose that includes various effect colors, but also balancing ones. It is called The ...


3

Katrin Eismann wrote an excellent book called Photoshop Restauration and Retouching. It is full of excellent advice targeted to your problem. There is also short discussion of using reference color charts. Highly recommended.


3

I cannot help you directly, but I can give you directions. I also think it is possible to automate the procedure, especially if the color chart has the same shape everywhere, but it requires some programming. An idea would be to load the X-Rite Passport plugin in Photoshop and try to use it to "calibrate" the image itself. However, you have fewer patches (...


3

You might have some success with using a lithographic material such as Kodalith-ortho, Type 3. It was used for photomechanical reproductions and special effects for light shows back in the day. It is high contrast and high density material. Density of 4.0 is normal. It can be screened for half-tone renditions. It has an ISO around 6. The sheets are ...


3

i need to make images from a roll of 35 mm positive film? The path of least resistance here is surely to just have the film scanned, or do it yourself, and print the images digitally.


3

I think your 'professional' is just saying he isn't set up to do this job. It's certainly possible to make prints from colour slides. Here's one company that offers this service in the UK. https://www.snappysnaps.co.uk/photo-printing/prints-photos-from-slides.html Years ago, this was done using either the Ilfochrome or 'Type R' processes. Now, I imagine ...


3

The easiest way to get prints of your positive film is to do the following: Digitize the film or have this done for you. (this is sometimes called duplicating, see note on historical nomenclature below) Retouch / remaster the image as desired Have the image printed or print it yourself. Note that if you want a photographic print, doing so is still possible ...


3

Your slides are most likely duplicates. The white borders are where some light leaked through the dark borders surrounding the image in the original film. Duplication is performed by bringing the unexposed slide film's emulsion directly into contact with the exposed slide film's emulsion and "flashing" the image onto the dupe. To learn more about "vintage" ...


3

Can any give me a good explanation of how this is supposed to work, or if it can work at all with a 100mm lens? If you're set on using a 100mm lens, you will need to add some more distance between the camera and bellows, using extension tubes. For 1:1 slide copy work, that bellows was intended to be used with a 50mm lens (or similar focal length). ...


3

You appear to have actually two [& a half] separate issues caused by the same thing. Firstly the blue spots - which, btw, won't do you any harm so long as you don't stare directly into the light a lot. The bulb appears to have several distinct LEDs inside it - not uncommon at all, & you would probably never notice in normal use, but for this ...


3

If the TIFF is 8-bit, the fact that the scanner is 12-bit is irrelevant, you have lost the 4 extra bits. TIFF is uncompressed... or not. TIFF is a very flexible format, and in some cases the a JPEG encoding can be used in the TIFF format. But if it"s 50 megs vs. 5 megs, it is likely a lossless encoding. A 95% JPEG is likely good enough. This is pretty ...


2

There are a few different types of slide duplicator designs: Some attach to the filter threads of a lens. This type of slide duplicator is easiest to use on crop-sensor bodies. Image quality depends mainly on the quality of the lens. Color quality depends on the light source. The duplicator is basically a slide attachment and a tube with a diopter filter ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible