We’re rewarding the question askers & reputations are being recalculated! Read more.

Hot answers tagged

20

Ordinary household bleach will destroy the image. The image is contained within a thin layer of gelatin. Household bleach will separate (lift off) the emulsion from the film base thus destroying the images.


9

You can have slide film processed like normal film, left in long strips, or more commonly they are individually cut into single frames and mounted in a cardboard or plastic holder, which keeps them flat, and these mounted slides can then be put in a cartridge of a slide projector. The mounts can be seen here. The processing is exactly the same, so no ...


8

... a normal shredder for paper actually creates stripes so wide that each is like a complete picture itself ... Most of the shredders you buy for home use don't cut the mustard; you want one that produces small enough pieces that the images would be useless. There's a standard for that, called DIN 66399, that defines source materials, levels of security ...


7

Any decent camera with some degree of macro capabilities will be a feasible slide/negative scanner, but, tthere are some other factors that incide a lot in the results. The first is an adequate backlighting device. Can be as complicated or as simple as you wish, as long as it allows you to get good exposure. I have tried different combinations of flash and ...


6

Yes, this was very popular in the 90s when lots of labs did PowerPoint to slide services. Have a look at the Wikipedia article on Film Recorders. A commercial operation still offering this service in the uk can be found at digitalslides. Polaroid used to manufacture a desktop slide (The ProPalette range) writer which was essentially a CRT and camera in a ...


6

If possible: move to digital My first thought is to move to digital: make digital scans or photos of your slides and use a digital projector and a laptop. One of the risks of a projector running 24x7 is overheating, with the possibility of a fire breaking out. Please be aware of that. Also take into account that you'll need to frequently change the light ...


5

Colour negative film has a wider dynamic range than transparency film. Depending on the quality of the scanning at your chosen developers, you may be able to get more detail in the highlights and shadows using negative film, and you will also have greater latitude to correct over- or underexposed photos. Slide film, on the other hand, (especially Velvia as ...


5

Fast scanning + Accurate Colour Reproduction without having to post process + Even lighting of the image + $500 USD = :-) ...you must be dreaming, :-) depending of course on what you mean by 'speed' (the main problem) and 'accuracy'. The real option here is Imacon. You have some cheaper solutions in Ken Rockwell's How to Scan Your 3,000 Slide Archive . ...


4

Aside from the recommendations from @Itai, do take your time to browse several related questions and answers here at photo.SE. Or just go ahead and browse the slides tag. There's tons of great advice all around this place.


4

There are plenty of alternatives for this: Have it done for you. Most photo labs offer this service. The advantage is that professionals do it and they may even clean up dust and spots for you. There is nothing for you to learn or buy, just spend the money for each slide. This is probably the way to go for small quantities in the low hundreds. Buy a slide ...


4

A few things can cause this issue: Reversed slides: the image is on the emulsion side, and due to the thickness of the backing, will not be in the focal plane of the lens. Different slide mounts: some processors may use mounts of different thickness from others, so you may need to remount all in a uniform thickness, e.g. B&H slide mounts. Thermal ...


4

Inkjet printing is not an option due to the real-world resolution that could be achieved being very low (<300dpi) added to other optical and ink based fuzz/bleed/dirt etc. Pigment inks are also opaque. Laser printing is also not an option as the toner is opaque and suffers similar resolution limits. You have only 2 options that I can think of: 1 - Make ...


4

A kitchen blender or food processor would do a pretty good job at converting the film to dust. You might add a slice of bread, some dry beans, or some other dry material to keep things moving inside the container. Used blenders are available in thrift stores for just a dollar or two if you think you wouldn't want to use the appliance for food after blending ...


4

I don't think I've ever seen anything handheld that would work with a carousel; the whole affair would be kind of unwieldy. Kodak used to make a couple of Ektagraphic models, the 270 and 570, that do exactly what you're after. Both are cube-shaped (about a foot in each dimension) and are completely self-contained. I'd be very surprised if you couldn't ...


4

Standard 35mm full frame size was 24 x 36, which gives you the normal 3:2 format. If the 5:4 ish ones are a larger area than the normal 36x24mm slides, they may be transparencies from 127 film, which allowed images up to 40x40mm to be fitted in 2" x 2" slide mounts (the same size as 35mm film slides). These larger slides were known as "superslides" (see ...


4

The emulsion side of Kodachrome was coated with a clear protective lacquer. Perhaps it has oxidized. Additionally, this coat may attract dust and such as it can gain an electrostatic charge. Lacquer is used to protect the Kodachrome emulsion. Lacquer is made from “guncotton”. Ordinary cotton is treated with nitric acid and solvents to make lacquer. As time ...


3

All film expires. Unfortunately, film expiry dates are printed on the box (which has obviously been discarded in this case), not on the 135 film cartridge itself. Fujifilm Sensia was discontinued in 2010. Expiry dates would be in the range of 2-3 years after manufacture. Film should really be cold stored over longer periods, but it's entirely possible that ...


3

You can find dedicated slide scannera for sale for less than the price of a lens. Then sell it after doing the project. Which means someone else thought of that first and you can find a gently used scanner on eBay discounted. If you recover most of the cost after the project, you can afford a very good one and end up being out $200 when you resell it.


3

If I understand your question correctly you place 4 slides in a transparency adapter, enable Multi Crop and then Vuescan recognizes (erroneously) that you want to scan 8 slides. Subsequently it starts scanning all 8 regions where it thinks slides are present. To only scan the four slides follow these steps: Enable Batch Scan in the Input tab. Choose All in ...


3

The answer will be highly dependent on the specifics of the situation, such as how much heat and humidity, and over what period of time. It's unlikely that anyone will be able to provide an accurate answer for your situation because you very likely haven't recorded the temperature and humidity levels over the storage period, but "incredibly hot" can't be ...


3

Well you can't shoot macro with the iPhone very well, so in a pinch you could of course take an image and crop to get a bit closer, but you are losing resolution. I wouldn't advise doing this unless it is your one and only option to capture the slide.


3

The safest, simplest, and cheapest way of destroying the images is to drop the slide film into boiling water. The gelatine-bearing image layers will quickly melt, slide off the film base into a black gelatinous mass which you discard into normal household waste. The plastic (PET) can be put into solid industrial waste although it is recyclable. Without ...


3

Google search led me to the following expired service: http://www.domainvanhorn.com/viewer/ As written in the page information, there is a regular slide film in the contraption, which consists of a matte white screen and a single simple lens. This is a setup comparable of the most simple slide viewers which, for example, can be found here: https://www....


3

I scan negatives and slides to create RAW files. It is largely a matter of scanner resolution limits and software. I use an Epson V700 which has a transparency scanner, film holders and a selection of software. It also can scan natively to 6400 pixels per inch. The software I use is Silverfast and Vuescan. Scanning film at sufficient resolution can be a ...


3

Googling around, it looks like you might be thinking of a Sawyer Bi-Lens 35mm slide viewer. Some were stereoscopes, some weren't, and apparently, some came with a built-in light and some didn't. It looks like there are a number for sale on eBay and the like (mostly with the built-in light and not the diffusion panel on the back), but as these are '50s / '...


3

Put a gel filter over your flash. Golden or orange (especially the CTO) will be best. These filters are available from various manufacturers and holders are also available,if you desire one. There is a product from Rosco that includes variety of pre-cut filters for this purpose that includes various effect colors, but also balancing ones. It is called The ...


3

Katrin Eismann wrote an excellent book called Photoshop Restauration and Retouching. It is full of excellent advice targeted to your problem. There is also short discussion of using reference color charts. Highly recommended.


3

I cannot help you directly, but I can give you directions. I also think it is possible to automate the procedure, especially if the color chart has the same shape everywhere, but it requires some programming. An idea would be to load the X-Rite Passport plugin in Photoshop and try to use it to "calibrate" the image itself. However, you have fewer patches (...


3

You might have some success with using a lithographic material such as Kodalith-ortho, Type 3. It was used for photomechanical reproductions and special effects for light shows back in the day. It is high contrast and high density material. Density of 4.0 is normal. It can be screened for half-tone renditions. It has an ISO around 6. The sheets are ...


3

i need to make images from a roll of 35 mm positive film? The path of least resistance here is surely to just have the film scanned, or do it yourself, and print the images digitally.


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible