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6

Oh my. Why on earth would you need to scan something at 4800 ppi? That would give you a file of 39840x56160 or a 2,237 Megapixels... a really pro normal digital shoot has rougly 80 to 100 Megapixels (not two thousand). The restrictions are likely for people do not freeze its computer or fill their hard drive with just 50 scans. A normal photo can be ...


6

Scanning handles removing the overall orange mask in color negative film. Scanning as positive, and then postprocessing invert does not remove it, inversion simply turns that orange mask to a deep blue overall. NOT Bluish, but very strongly deep blue. Then additional work to try to remove it. This is a difficult job to do in digital postprocessing (not ...


4

The major quality-determining components of film scanners are similar to those of camera systems – lenses and sensors. Better components are more expensive. Keep in mind that the "scanners" you're considering are the low-end point-and-shoots of the film scanning world. If that is all you need and expect, you may find them to be more than "passably good". ...


4

I got the idea to delete the scanner from "Printers and Scanners" and re-add it. It reloaded the driver and I think it was a newer version of the driver. Anyway, it allowed the "Transparency Unit" option to show.


4

I would suggest a book or two that are bigger than the sheet of paper. You won't be able to close the lid, but that shouldn't be an issue - the scanner will still scan. Obviously the glass is fragile to a point - you don't want to put 50 lb of stuff on it - but it should be plenty strong to handle a book or two. The important bit is making sure that at least ...


4

Flatbed scanners with film scanning capability have not completely disappeared from the market. You are correct, scanning film requires the film to be backlit. So scanners with the capability have an illumination source on both sides of the scanner platen. It is (sometimes?) called a "Transparency Unit". "Back in the day", that's how it ...


3

Is this normal? It might be "normal" in the sense that your hardware isn't broken, but you'll very likely get a better result with better equipment. Am I overthinking this and these "defects" are actually unimportant? That depends on how much the photos and the scans mean to you. If the photos are fairly stable now and you feel like you'll be able to ...


3

I scan negatives and slides to create RAW files. It is largely a matter of scanner resolution limits and software. I use an Epson V700 which has a transparency scanner, film holders and a selection of software. It also can scan natively to 6400 pixels per inch. The software I use is Silverfast and Vuescan. Scanning film at sufficient resolution can be a ...


3

You will be much happier if scanning slides with it than if scanning color negatives. This inexpensive type will have a tiny compact-camera style sensor and an inexpensive lens (whereas a DSLR camera will have a much larger sensor and maybe a $600 macro lens, which will of course be better). Hopefully the lens is adequate, but even this inexpensive camera ...


2

When I started in graphic design back in the mid 90s, epson was my printer and scanner of choice. Outstanding results up to 13 x 19. Related to this series of Q&A, I purchased at considerable cost and epson 10000Xl scanner. 48 bit color depth and the ability to scan up flat and sometimes not very flat objects. It would capture up to .25 inches depth of ...


2

You are correct that older scanners are more likely to have a larger DoF, this is because many "old" scanners you can find secondhand are going to have CCD scanning technology which has been phased out in favor of cheaper (and in many use cases better) CIS. Nowadays, CCD technology is mainly found in higher-end "photo scanners" and large-format scanners ...


2

I've successfully scanned batches of postcards, photos, and even entire thick old photo album pages with a 600dpi Canon P-208ii document scanner. It scans both sides at once, outputs to a range of formats including JPG and PDF, can do automatic image corrections and alignment on the fly, and works pretty fast. Pricewise, it's currently available from online ...


2

A DSLR is not required for 3D scanning. With simple, low-poly scans, you're better off with a multi-sensor array like a Kinect or Leap-Motion. However, for ultra-high quality, high-poly scans, a camera like a DSLR would be advantageous. a Nikon L20 Coolpix is not a DSLR, but it will serve the purpose with its 10.34MP sensor.


2

So I got myself a Reflecta RPS 10M and made a comparison with my now old Epson V350. I scanned a color negativ, a cross processed and a black & white image, uploaded them as jpg. For converting the color negativ to a positive I used the PS plug-in "ColorPerfect" with the settings it suggested but without film-presets. Converting the cross ...


2

This is known as a moire pattern, and it is a result of the source image being composed of a regular dot pattern in a grid - called "halftoning". The grid of the dots in the original image is misaligning with the pixels the scanner sees, so you see a beat pattern forming signalling this difference. The way to overcome (or at least minimise) this is to scan ...


2

Normally, the idea is that to print double size, you scan at 600 dpi and print at 300 dpi (for 2x). Or to print triple size, you scan at 900 dpi, and print at 300 dpi (for 3x). Anyway, that is the idea for printing enlarged copies. However, prints really don't enlarge very well. One, prints are already enlarged, and two, print paper is simply only designed ...


2

UPDATED The program has been updated to work with a range of scanner geometries and is no longer limited to the Epson V850. This is accomplished by creating a custom scanner reflection matrix calculated from a specially printed page. A tif image of this calibration page is provided for printing and then scanned which is used to create a scanner specific ...


2

I also suspect that there is something inside your scanner interfering with scans. Since the defect follows the direction of the scan, the problem is probably located on the scanning unit (not the glass). For scanners that use CIS (contact image sensor), it could be located on the "light conductor" that is in near contact with the scanning surface. For ...


2

The results you will get are simply very bad. Pro-am scanners don’t go below $900 and lately you will have to shell another $200 to get the license that allows the full functionality of the software. The cheapest used pro scanners, if you find them because they are not manufactured anymore, will set you back a minimum of $5000 and another $1000 for one ...


2

In a comment to the video linked in the question, I wrote down my fix, but here it is. For those who have an issue with the transparency option, I just fixed it for myself. I have installed the Epson Scan 2 again, and turn off the scanner. When it was installed, I opened the program and turned on the scanner again, (also disconnected from electricity) ...


2

Another reason for this to happen, as I found out today, could be the connector that goes from the cover to the base unit getting loose. If the scanner cannot sense the connected cover, which contains the moving backlight for slide scanning, it acts as a simple flatbed scanner. Pull the connector out, blow some compressed air into the socket, then securely ...


2

There will be minimal benefit from scanning prints at 2400dpi, as opposed to 1200dpi. Most prints do not benefit from being scanned at resolutions higher than about 200-300 dpi. Reasons to use higher resolutions include being able to make enlargements. There is more to scan quality than resolution, like color depth, noise, and dynamic range. However, these ...


2

Photographing negatives with a digital camera is an alternative to a flatbed scanner. For on screen use, a even a modern smart device camera may be good enough. Because negatives and slides modulate light by transmission rather than reflection, capturing their information effectively requires a light source behind the negative. Bespoke products are available ...


1

Many scanners have a white calibration strip to calibrate the sensor before scanning. Dirt on the strip results in vertical lines. Usually, the dirt got there during maintenance or transport. See also: Fixing Vertical Lines on a Scanner.


1

There have been some years since I used a scanner. But I would probably buy one 3mm glass, sand the edges to smooth them round and use it if I am scanning rocks. When scanning other objects and need sharper look, remove it. Just be careful that the "protective layer" does not become "the weapon of doom" for your scanner. I have the feeling that this extra ...


1

You've too many questions to answer easily, but generally speaking, I'd have to say YES to all of them. I think Caleb had the best approach. I have been scanning for many different types of jobs, and they all needed something "special" - the client needed it special! Go to Ebay, and find a new or used scanner that has high specs (scan ratios, variable output,...


1

I can not recommend any scanner. It has been some time since I use one. But one thing to keep an eye on would be dynamic range. This will give you the ability to see details on the shadows and avoid blowing the light areas. https://www.google.com/search?q=dynamic+range+on+a+scanner


1

Whenever an illuminant is not specified, assume it's D50 as that is the standard the ICC adapts its profiles to even if the device illuminant differs. For instance a Lab reading in a Photoshop image is relative to D50 whether the image is sRGB or ProPhoto. Scanner profile reference data sets in Lab use D50 even though the scanner's light is rarely close to ...


1

My IT8 that came with the Epson V850 is made on Kodak Endura paper. It doesn't have OBAs but it does have a fluorescent substrate and produces significant shift under uV as demonstrated with these I1Pro 2 white patch readings using M1(including D50 levels of uV) and M2 (uV cut): L*a*b* M1: 90.5 0.9 -3.7 L*a*b* M2: 90.4 -0.3 0.4 This is a similar shift as ...


1

Ink is not opaque, it is translucent. You are correct. IT8 targets are printed on paper without optical brighteners. The nature and variety of paper surface optical brighteners makes their involvement problematic.


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