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6

Exif has two fields to store an image description: XPTitle and ImageDescription. What field your scanner use? The below command line (via ExifTool) will erase all of your Exif:Description and Exif:XPTitle fields of the images in the specified directory: exiftool.exe -exif:ImageDescription= -exif:XPTitle= "YOURDIR" Although any decent photo management ...


6

Scanning handles removing the overall orange mask in color negative film. Scanning as positive, and then postprocessing invert does not remove it, inversion simply turns that orange mask to a deep blue overall. NOT Bluish, but very strongly deep blue. Then additional work to try to remove it. This is a difficult job to do in digital postprocessing (not ...


5

Fast scanning + Accurate Colour Reproduction without having to post process + Even lighting of the image + $500 USD = :-) ...you must be dreaming, :-) depending of course on what you mean by 'speed' (the main problem) and 'accuracy'. The real option here is Imacon. You have some cheaper solutions in Ken Rockwell's How to Scan Your 3,000 Slide Archive . ...


4

I use jhead for simple things like this. jhead -dc file.jpg will delete the comment field, or you can use jhead -cl "new comment" file.jpg to replace it. It also has a number of options for setting time and date, including taking the new EXIF date from the file's timestamp, or else setting it from the command line. It's open-source software and comes with ...


4

This totally depends on the bundled software. My old scanner had really horrible software that required me to follow something like 7 configuration steps in order to scan negative film - and repeat those steps for every single scan, even if I scan several pieces of negative film in a row. On the other side, some high-end scanners come bundled with ...


4

Sometimes, outsourcing this particular job is best, especially if it involves a large volume of material. I'm pretty sure there are lots of them offering these services in your area.


4

Since you're open to a negative scanner consider the Nikon Super Coolscan 5000ED, it can scan whole rolls of negatives, individual 6-photo strips of negatives or up to 50 slides (in a slide hopper) at a time. I use the 6-photo strip adapter and slide hopper. The 50 slide hopper and negative roll adapter are extra attachments you need to purchase but the ...


4

Using a scanner as a camera is no abuse at all, Scanography is certainly photography and arguably an art form. In order to achieve the necessary DoF, you will need a scanner with a CCD sensor. The newer (and thinner) ones use a CIS sensor and thus have a very shallow DoF. Just keep in mind that most CCD scanners are going to be more expensive. You may want ...


4

The major quality-determining components of film scanners are similar to those of camera systems – lenses and sensors. Better components are more expensive. Keep in mind that the "scanners" you're considering are the low-end point-and-shoots of the film scanning world. If that is all you need and expect, you may find them to be more than "passably good". ...


3

I'm aware of at least one 3D scanner manufactured by HP called "Top Shot". It uses an array CCD instead of a linescan CCD + scanning mechanism, so it should also capture images faster, although the effective resolution is likely not quite as high as a traditional flat-bed scanner. The downside/upside (depending on your needs) is that the scanner is part of ...


3

I doubt most people owning such a scanner are willing to part with the parts, as they haven't been in production for a long time and supplier stocks will have depleted years ago (if they could still be found after all the Minolta/Konica/Sony mergers). Your best bet may be to look for someone trying to sell a scanner complete with the parts, either on eBay, ...


3

I scan negatives and slides to create RAW files. It is largely a matter of scanner resolution limits and software. I use an Epson V700 which has a transparency scanner, film holders and a selection of software. It also can scan natively to 6400 pixels per inch. The software I use is Silverfast and Vuescan. Scanning film at sufficient resolution can be a ...


3

This is a partial solution in that it only works for the Epson V850. In the case of the V850, I've put together a program in C++ on github tailored to the Epson V850 which models the neighboring, reflected light and subtracts it from the image. However, this uses a model specific to the Epson V850. It corrects most of the large area spatial crosstalk as you ...


3

Is this normal? It might be "normal" in the sense that your hardware isn't broken, but you'll very likely get a better result with better equipment. Am I overthinking this and these "defects" are actually unimportant? That depends on how much the photos and the scans mean to you. If the photos are fairly stable now and you feel like you'll be able to ...


3

You will be much happier if scanning slides with it than if scanning color negatives. This inexpensive type will have a tiny compact-camera style sensor and an inexpensive lens (whereas a DSLR camera will have a much larger sensor and maybe a $600 macro lens, which will of course be better). Hopefully the lens is adequate, but even this inexpensive camera ...


2

I've successfully scanned batches of postcards, photos, and even entire thick old photo album pages with a 600dpi Canon P-208ii document scanner. It scans both sides at once, outputs to a range of formats including JPG and PDF, can do automatic image corrections and alignment on the fly, and works pretty fast. Pricewise, it's currently available from online ...


2

A DSLR is not required for 3D scanning. With simple, low-poly scans, you're better off with a multi-sensor array like a Kinect or Leap-Motion. However, for ultra-high quality, high-poly scans, a camera like a DSLR would be advantageous. a Nikon L20 Coolpix is not a DSLR, but it will serve the purpose with its 10.34MP sensor.


2

I like the broad hardware and OS support, nice license, and rapid update cycle, of VueScan - it runs on all the desktop machines in my home, and talks to all the scanners.


2

This behaviour is not normal. Aperture should write the assosiated source file(s) to the directory you specify in the export dialog, depending on the options probably in a subfolder named by the project. So something goes severly wrong. For troubleshooting I suggest you check the following things: Does this happen to all photos or only to one/some? Is the ...


2

This is known as a moire pattern, and it is a result of the source image being composed of a regular dot pattern in a grid - called "halftoning". The grid of the dots in the original image is misaligning with the pixels the scanner sees, so you see a beat pattern forming signalling this difference. The way to overcome (or at least minimise) this is to scan ...


2

Normally, the idea is that to print double size, you scan at 600 dpi and print at 300 dpi (for 2x). Or to print triple size, you scan at 900 dpi, and print at 300 dpi (for 3x). Anyway, that is the idea for printing enlarged copies. However, prints really don't enlarge very well. One, prints are already enlarged, and two, print paper is simply only designed ...


2

Oh my. Why on earth would you need to scan something at 4800 ppi? That would give you a file of 39840x56160 or a 2,237 Megapixels... a really pro normal digital shoot has rougly 80 to 100 Megapixels (not two thousand). The restrictions are likely for people do not freeze its computer or fill their hard drive with just 50 scans. A normal photo can be ...


2

I also suspect that there is something inside your scanner interfering with scans. Since the defect follows the direction of the scan, the problem is probably located on the scanning unit (not the glass). For scanners that use CIS (contact image sensor), it could be located on the "light conductor" that is in near contact with the scanning surface. For ...


2

The results you will get are simply very bad. Pro-am scanners don’t go below $900 and lately you will have to shell another $200 to get the license that allows the full functionality of the software. The cheapest used pro scanners, if you find them because they are not manufactured anymore, will set you back a minimum of $5000 and another $1000 for one ...


1

To be clear, the Q-60 (a.k.a. IT8) is used to create a color profile of your scanner, not to calibrate the scanner. The scanner should calibrate itself on startup. Also, this will only provide a "close enough" process, since your archival scanning may include prints on various materials (matte, glossy, magazine, newspaper, etc.). In order for this to work ...


1

There are photo service bureaus that will scan your film for you, and there are many scanners available that can support scanning transparencies or film. For example the Epson Perfection V600 http://amzn.to/2avk6wY . You'd need to make sure it can mount your film size. It is best to scan at the native resolution of the scanner. Many times scanners have ...


1

It's tricky to compare RAW file formats from digital cameras and film scanners. They're quite different. A raw file from a digital camera contains the 'unprocessed' sensor data along with a set of metadata. These allow proper decoding of the raw data. Typical example is information on how to perform demosaicing of the raw sensor data (most digital photo ...


1

Any scanner will do provided it can scan transparencies as well as photographs. I have not run Linux since the days of the very early Red Hat distributions. I cannot help with scanning software. In the non-Linux world I would suggest something professional in the way of scanning software such as Silverfast. Vuescan is also an excellent piece of software and ...


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