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12

Portra is a low-contrast, low-saturation film made primarily for wedding and portrait photographers (it's the successor to Vericolor III Professional). It's designed to capture the details in both the white wedding dress and the black tuxedo at the same time, while rendering pleasing, blemish-minimized skin tones. There's nothing special about its grain ...


9

Six-20, also known as 620, is the film size that fits your camera. The film itself was the same as the more standard 120 film. The only difference is the size of the spool upon which it is wound. A 120 spool will not fit in most 620 cameras. Unfortunately, no one currently produces 620 film. If you have two 620 sized spools you can wind 120 film onto 620 ...


9

The overlap in ASA/ISO is because that's definitely not the main distinguishing factor. The most obvious differences are in the color/tone curves and grain characteristics. There are two color choices in Kodak's "professional" line: Portra is, as the name kind of implies, intended for portraits. It features subtle colors and is not very saturated. ...


8

You have two problems. The one you've noticed is water spots remaining on the negatives when the film has been hung to dry. Re-washing and drying may help. It may not remedy the problem if the emulsion side of the film is affected. After the fixer bath, wash longer than you have been to get rid of ALL the fixer that has been absorbed by the emulsion. ...


8

There are a couple of considerations here... When Kodak Vision3 500T is used for stills photography, very often it has been pre-treated to remove the RemJet anti-halation layer, to make it compatible with the standard C-41 process. This process effectively increases the sensitivity of the film to ISO 800. CineStill 800T is Vision3 500T with the RemJet layer ...


7

A short final wash in distilled water with a wetting agent is always a good practice. Consider Ilford Ilfotol or Tetenal Mirasol or something of the like. Distilled water in development and fixing is not as crucial as in the final wash - unless your tap water is especially hard it should have little effect. The D76 by Kodak is a tolerant soup (if you mix ...


6

Unfortunately 126 film is no longer made, and even the stocks that were held on to after production ended have for the most part dried up. The good news is that you have another option, and that is to reload the 126 film cartridges with 35mm film. The 126 film was after all, just 35mm film in a more convenient roll that didn't require film leaders or ...


6

At least the later Easyshare cameras had a feature called "spot color": it would allow you to select a color, and the rest of the picture is converted to black and white. I was able to find this feature described for an Easyshare camera introduced in 2011 (it says: "[...] or add in effects like background blur and spot color easily from the touch screen."). ...


6

A library might be a better option. People are always trying to give their old computers and whatnot to schools, when what schools need is up-to-date equipment. Teachers these days probably don't have a lot of 35mm slides to show, but they do a lot with PowerPoint presentations on digital displays. A community library is more likely to have resources on ...


6

You should double check the specs on the point and shoot to see if 1) it has the technology to read the ISO from the canister's barcode and 2) use that ISO even if it is outside of the user-adjustable settings. But, let's assume it can't and the highest you can set it is to 400 and let's also assume you use 800 speed film. In this case, your camera will be ...


5

While officially the last roll was developed 7years ago, as of a few months ago, there appears to be one guy who sort of figured out how develop Kodachrome. He might do it for you with no guarantees. Check out the following and the best of luck with where they lead: https://www.facebook.com/groups/119931904758842/permalink/1226654574086564/ https://www....


5

At the moment I don't believe there is any way to develop your Kodachrome, either yourself or commercially. It's a complicated process that never AFAIK was able to be done at home. There were rumors that Kodak Alaris would consider restarting manufacturing of Kodachrome, but Kodak later said that that would be expensive and environmentally problematic, so ...


5

Disposable cameras usually work in a completely fixed mode of operation (lens focus, aperture and shutter speed). The flash can be turned on or off but power output is fixed . Exposure variations are handled during developing (since nobody expects the absolute highest quality from disposable cameras the effects of pushing or pulling the film go unnoticed). ...


5

Based on the following evidence: Both pictures are underexposed or simply have dark zones on it's borders (black zones are more sensitive to parasitic light inside the camera) Looking at the interframe, the affected zones of both images point to the same interframe. Looking at the interframe, the affected zone extends beyond the pictures, onto the film ...


5

All four of the sample images were shot under four different lighting scenarios. Even the two shot under daylight will be different due to the influence of all of the green vegetation in the first shot. The fact that you used a very different film for the first two shot with the Contax than you used to shoot the second two with your Yashica makes it even ...


5

ISO (derived from ASA), can be approximated as the reciprocal of the shutter speed which, at f/16, produces a satisfactory exposure in bright sunlight. E.G. old Kodachrome, ASA 10, required 1/10 second exposure at f/16 in bright sunlight. Portra 160, at f/16 and 1/160 s in bright sun, should produce as dense an image as Portra 400, at f/16 and 1/400 s in ...


5

6011 is the product number. This designates it as Vericolor Internegative Film, which is also printed out on the label. It was made to be processed by conventional C-41 chemistry. ECN-2 chemistry could also be used to develop it. 36-54 appears to be a batch number. Kodak introduced 6011 in 1978. The expiration date was around 20 months after manufacture, so ...


4

According to Kodak, Supra was discontinued over 10 years ago : http://www.kodak.com/global/en/professional/support/techPubs/e2519/e2519.pdf So if your store is still carrying Supra, check the expiration dates on the boxes. For Kodak, you now have the choice of Portra 160, 400, or 800 or Ektar 100. For Fuji, it looks likes the only choice you have is ...


4

Kodachrome is very much developable in just about any B&W developer. I've had luck with 64ISO Kodachrome in D-76 (1+1) and in Caffenol. I'm trying some Kodachrome II which is 25ISO in D-76. Dev time for the 64ISO Kodachrome in 1+1 D-76 was 6:30 at 20* Celsius, fix time was 7:15 (because you can't over-fix) and I finished the rinse with a little bit of ...


4

Speed and contrast is determined mainly by the recipe used to make the film. The chief ingredient is crystals of silver salts (there are three). These are called silver halides (Swedish for salt maker). The crystals are grown in a gelatin solution. The size and shape of the crystal are carefully controlled. Fast films have a tendency to have larger crystals ...


4

You can, but you will be overexposing the film unless you make some sort of adjustment. Colour negative film can take overexposure like that, but you'd be better to shoot actual ISO 400 colour film instead. Here are your options: if your camera has an exposure compensation mode, you can dial in -1 compensation. This will give you an effective ISO of 800. ...


4

It all depends on how, and even if, the camera calculates exposure. The other answers cover cameras with built-in automatic exposure controls, so we'll talk about more rudimentary cameras here. The simplest film cameras have no exposure meter and very little or no adjustment of shutter time or aperture. Many of the old instamatics were such cameras. They ...


4

The emulsion side of Kodachrome was coated with a clear protective lacquer. Perhaps it has oxidized. Additionally, this coat may attract dust and such as it can gain an electrostatic charge. Lacquer is used to protect the Kodachrome emulsion. Lacquer is made from “guncotton”. Ordinary cotton is treated with nitric acid and solvents to make lacquer. As time ...


4

This will be a personal artistic decision - it is not like one of the developers would work and the other would not. Both are fine, and both are different. Having said that: the typical use case for Rodinal are classical grain films (in Ilford lineup this would mean FP4/HP5+). It is a high acutance developer, producing unmistakably grainy (not unpleasingly ...


3

It's either unexposed or partially exposed. From tmtv.net's page on old movie film processing, if the roll was completely exposed, you'd see this: "EXPOSED" meaning the film has been shot and ready for processing (developing). DO NOT REMOVE OR ATTEMPT TO OPEN THE CARTRIDGE. If it does not say "exposed" it was either removed from the Super 8 camera ...


3

I cannot help you directly, but I can give you directions. I also think it is possible to automate the procedure, especially if the color chart has the same shape everywhere, but it requires some programming. An idea would be to load the X-Rite Passport plugin in Photoshop and try to use it to "calibrate" the image itself. However, you have fewer patches (...


3

Katrin Eismann wrote an excellent book called Photoshop Restauration and Retouching. It is full of excellent advice targeted to your problem. There is also short discussion of using reference color charts. Highly recommended.


3

The Kodak Star 500 camera uses 35mm film, technically known as 135 format.


3

If you're looking for the size, it's 35mm. If you're looking for specific brands, it depends on your skill level. If you're just starting out, or don't want to spend a lot of money on the film I suggest you go with Fujicolor, as they are relatively cheap and are good quality.


3

Portra 400 is a portrait film and being so it's contrast is not as high as a typical general purpose film. The skin tones will also be more natural, too. Based on the image, especially the one with man sitting, I would argue that the problem is not with the film but with the way the image was scanned or printed. Specifically the contrast is way too high ...


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