6

Just so this isn't an 'answer in a comment' Before you give up, try VueScan - specifically reverse-engineered older drivers to run on Big Sur. I haven't used it myself, but a lot of people have been talking about it this past year - https://www.hamrick.com


6

I get reasonably good results photographing negatives with a slide copier attachment and a macro lens (vs using a flatbed scanner). However, if you plan to scan many frames of film, you should consider a dedicated film scanner with batch feeder. Depending on your lens and camera, image quality from a film scanner may or may not be better, but it would be ...


5

Without being able to see the negatives in question, there are three things you should check: Monitor calibration: This can be ruled out somewhat if you can make two identical scans with the same parameters (curve, white/mid/black points, etc.). Backlight on your scanner: I have had issues with my own scanner where sometimes the backlight is set very bright ...


4

I got the idea to delete the scanner from "Printers and Scanners" and re-add it. It reloaded the driver and I think it was a newer version of the driver. Anyway, it allowed the "Transparency Unit" option to show.


4

In the case of a film scanner, an IT-8 target is a slide of known colours that you scan, and then you use software to analyse the scanned image to compare with those known colours. This characterises the colour-reading ability of your particular device, and allows a customised colour profile to be generated that can be applied to subsequent scans of positive ...


4

but I'm wondering if I will see either a difference in quality if I were to use something like a Lecia Sofort, or one of the (newish?) Fujifilm instax? There's actually quite a bit of difference between instant cameras and those that shoot film. Film, the negative, is designed to be an intermediary process. It's designed knowing full well that someone will ...


4

The Nikon scanners do not require regular maintenance. They are however quite prone to dirt and dust. Your best bet keeping the scanner running problem free for a long time is to store it in a clean place (wrapped in a cover) when not in use. Some units are also starting to show signs of age and may e.g. have problems with the lubrication drying out. They ...


4

Flatbed scanners with film scanning capability have not completely disappeared from the market. You are correct, scanning film requires the film to be backlit. So scanners with the capability have an illumination source on both sides of the scanner platen. It is (sometimes?) called a "Transparency Unit". "Back in the day", that's how it ...


3

Not a task I've ever needed to do, but why not kill two birds with one stone & just outsource the job to a decent photo lab? They could provide full-scale images & thumbs [contact sheet quality] all in one pass. You could then reference one to the other by filename & keep/discard in pairs. Snapping each one with a phone just sounds like masochism ...


3

In case you are interested. I have created a workflow and code to create ICC profiles for color negatives. It is intended to be used with digital cameras but could be adapted to scanners as well. See code here: https://github.com/arufahc/negicc


3

This is what I would start with. You'll likely have to tweak settings to fit your specific needs. The main setting to disable is Digital ICE. The silver in B&W film interferes with its function. Original: Document Type and Film Type – These probably just set some reasonable defaults. What you've selected seems appropriate (Film, B&W Negative). Scan ...


3

Simply put: No. You don't really need to worry about dynamic range if you are planning to scan ordinary color negatives. A scanner's Dmax becomes a limiting factor only when scanning high-density transparency material like color-reversal films. In order to tell you why I have to clarify a couple of concepts. Film Density As you expose and develop a film, ...


2

A possible algorithm for better isolate the dust and scratches is explained in Comprehensive Solutions for Removal of Dust and Scratches from Images and in Manual Dirt/Scratch Removal Using Infrared Channel (archived version, text-only). The idea is to remove the shadow of the color information from the infrared image by using the red channel (the one with ...


2

FWIW, there is wider sleeving that will hold four strips of 3 6x7s, such as this sleeving material. If the scanner only detects the first two frames, then after you've scanned the first two frames, maybe you can insert the film upside-down to get the scanner to detect the last frame, then rotate that scan afterward.


2

Wasting a sleeve is the right way to go unfortunately. If you're extremely careful yes they will barely fit in as 3s, but I've found that they'll slip out one edge and damage your film if you breath wrong. Definitely do not go with an internegative (rephotographing your negatives) process, I'm not sure where that came from.


2

In a comment to the video linked in the question, I wrote down my fix, but here it is. For those who have an issue with the transparency option, I just fixed it for myself. I have installed the Epson Scan 2 again, and turn off the scanner. When it was installed, I opened the program and turned on the scanner again, (also disconnected from electricity) ...


2

Another reason for this to happen, as I found out today, could be the connector that goes from the cover to the base unit getting loose. If the scanner cannot sense the connected cover, which contains the moving backlight for slide scanning, it acts as a simple flatbed scanner. Pull the connector out, blow some compressed air into the socket, then securely ...


2

Since I don’t own a scanner and don’t run a Mac, this is a little out of left field...why not just keep the old computer and scanner as dedicated hardware for scanning film? It works now. It will continue to work if you buy another computer. It’s not terribly hard to network a couple of computers together so files can be shared. The analogy I would use is to ...


2

Photographing negatives with a digital camera is an alternative to a flatbed scanner. For on screen use, a even a modern smart device camera may be good enough. Because negatives and slides modulate light by transmission rather than reflection, capturing their information effectively requires a light source behind the negative. Bespoke products are available ...


1

Sorry, not an answer to the exact question, but it is a possible workaround to keep using your old scanner, software and reduce you impact on the environment as no new scanner is bought. Mac's can boot from an external harddrive. By following these (rough) steps you can create an environment where you can keep using your old scanner: Set-up an external ...


1

My (fairly old) Epson V200 scanner, as set up to scan negative/slides: Specs says it can scan at 4800DPI, so you can get a 30Mpix image out of a 35mm slide/negative (personally never went that far). Epson still has photo-capable scanners in its line-up.


1

In case you have a sufficiently large amount of pictures, I recommend buying specialized hardware with an automated feeder. 16 bits per channel is an absolute necessity! Depending on your use case, you may want to rent one rather than buy one. I used a https://reflecta.de/en/computer-required/23-reflecta-digitdia-7000-magazinscanner.html (I am not affiliated ...


1

I decided to do a test to see if Vuescan does indeed allow one to set different focus points, for the different slides in a batch (a load of 5 slides in the Nikon LS-8000 mounted-slide film holder), and use those distinct focus points when doing a batch scan. I fabricated a test slide that's split, with two different "heights": on the left side, ...


1

There's usually a trade-off between image quality and time. Equipment capable of higher bit depths and resolution take longer to scan. However, your resolution requirements are modest, so you could set a lower resolution to scan more quickly. Batch scanning saves your time, so even if the scan speed is slower, it would be more convenient, unless you're ...


1

The other end of the line would be scan raw, invert and edit myself. But this seems as a bad starting point for editing, because at first i have to get rid of film tint and apply my own subjective color grading. You mention the Photoshop plug-in ColorPerfect. They accept linear scan data as one of their input modes, which deals with the inversion and color ...


1

I had to reload Scan 2 software, restart the computer (macOS 10.15.6), add the scanner to Mac preferences, unplug the scanner, etc - at least two times, and in various sequences, then magically "transparency unit" appeared.


1

It looks like your scanner is scanning with a limited spectrum when you ask to scan BW begative images, hence the flattening when luminance details come from blue and green channels, and little from red channel. When I take the red channel from the color scan you published, I get (with few adjustements with 'curves') a very close result as your BW scans, ...


1

Putting this in answer form only because it claimed my comment was too long.... You would have better luck with this question in Ubuntu's SE: http://askubuntu.com/ Your options will probably be limited but I wouldn't be surprised if there are a few open source solutions available outside of Ubuntu's Software Center. I've never dealt with the scanning of ...


1

There is a lot to be gained and a lot to be lost by passing via a scanner rather than an enlarger. If you have really to use a scanner (maybe you don't have a darkroom) you should make sure that you are doing your best to preserve information. This includes avoiding clipping and imposing a curve (that is, scanning directly to jpg) and making sure that you ...


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