11

Make a film straightening solution -- ½ ounce glycerin to 16 ounces of water. Soak the curled film in plain water, in time the film will become limp. Transfer the film to the straighten solution, soak for 1 hour. Rinse in running water for 5 minutes. Soak for 30 seconds in PhotoFlow (wetting agent). Hand out to air dry.


8

There are a number of important details missing from your question: What resolution do you require? Color or black and white? Does the scanner have to be able to handle a mix of sizes simultaneously, or can you sort them ahead of time so that all the photos in a given stack are the same? (Sheet feeders typically work best when the sheets are about the same ...


7

Processed film does deteriorate, but not at such a rate that surviving 10-15 years would be remarkable! It also depends on the type of film; black & white film lasts longer than colour film for example. (Indeed, when film studios want to store an old colour movie, they separate the colour film into its R, G and B channels, and record each channel ...


7

'Photography files' are no different to any other kind of file. Use NTFS (because it allows for larger files and is generally the newer, better system) and the default allocation unit size - a larger size will make virtually no noticeable performance difference in a modern hard drive.


5

...what kind of print do you do so that it can be kept for longer time without any damage? I generally don't worry too much about archival quality or longevity of my prints; I'm cheap and use a dye-based inkjet printer, rather than a pigment-based one. But since I do the prints on my own printer on photo paper that I can easily purchase, I figure I can ...


4

The emulsion side of Kodachrome was coated with a clear protective lacquer. Perhaps it has oxidized. Additionally, this coat may attract dust and such as it can gain an electrostatic charge. Lacquer is used to protect the Kodachrome emulsion. Lacquer is made from “guncotton”. Ordinary cotton is treated with nitric acid and solvents to make lacquer. As time ...


4

Use NTFS unless you plan on connecting this drive to a system which only supports FAT. Also, set the Allocation Unit Size as high as possible per http://www.howtogeek.com/136078/what-should-i-set-the-allocation-unit-size-to-when-formatting/ For a media disk where you photos, music and videos are stored, every file is at least 1MB I use the biggest AUS. ...


4

Let me answer your direct question first: The document imaging folks have been doing this for ages. They typically are used for huge image scanning projects, like the US Census form processing. I've never seen one for photos, but that is really just a difference in pixel density -- everything else would be the same. These are insanely expensive to buy, and ...


3

Keep your current date-based organizational scheme for files Add XMP metadata to the files, including keywords, titles, and descriptions Use a database to collect this centrally, and allow search and presentation based on the metadata This has all of the organizational advantages you cite, with few disadvantages. XMP is XML-based, so not quite human-...


3

I have done some tests. I made some business card sized images and printed them on Xerox paper, matt coated one side, 95 gm/square metre. To form a two sided image I printed, using an ink-jet printer. The front and back were adjacent so that I could fold the result. I used Staples (the office supplier) glossy 125 micron (each side, 250 micron total) thick ...


2

I'm not sure exactly what you mean by "mimics their collections," but I do something similar to what you're describing in my Dropbox and Aperture exports. (Dropbox for off-site backup, Aperture for intelligent iDevice sharing. Yes, I bought Aperture just to make iTunes happy. You're welcome, Apple.) I use Jeffrey Friedl's Folder Publisher plugin, rather ...


2

There is optical media specifically designed for archival purposes. It's available for CD and DVD, but I'm not sure about Blu-ray. This article has some good information. Personally I go with SATA HDDs. Hard disks have known longevity characteristics, they're quite cheap for reasonable sizes (certainly cheaper per GB than any archival optical media). I ...


2

This doesn't speak to your exact question, but if you are backing up a lot of files, I would highly recommend creating PArchive parity files for the data you back up. Basically PArchive files (generally *.par, *.par2 or *.par3) are checksum and parity files. As such, they allow the detection and recovery of files from limited bit-rot, using a mechanism ...


2

I would like to send them to scan by a professional laboratory but I would rather not hire the service should they not be still good. The results will be a function of both the quality of the negatives and the quality of the service. A sensible approach would be to start with a small test batch and see how they do. Even if they negatives have deteriorated ...


2

Archive requirements for film generally err on the cautious side. A couple of years ago I had all my colour negatives scanned. These spanned the period 1971-2003, and had been stored in a variety of places and conditions, many of them far from ideal. While I had a small percentage of failures, these tended to be physical damage to the frames, rather than ...


2

It certainly depends on quality of processing, film brand, gasses in the storage area and other factors, but in general, 10-15 years should not be a big deal. There may be some color shifts but it should be possible to fix them during or after scanning. Humidity may be a problem. Check the films for spots, stains etc.


2

I can't find anything on long-term archival properties of Instax film, either, but this phoblographer article on current instant film and cameras mentions that the B&W Instax will turn sepia (but also states the prints don't fade), so I would assume that the B&W version isn't any more archival than the color. Polaroids are known to fade. Instant ...


2

Extended FAT is now one of the most adopted format for external disks that have to deal with different operating systems as Mac and Linux


1

I think you maybe asking two separate sets of questions: 1) What are recommended settings and conditions for the best photo and 2) What is the best format to ensure longevity of the digital file? For 1) it depends on your subject, but otherwise I suggest reading on product shot information or better yet, hire a professional photographer that shoots similar ...


1

One method for somewhat organized transfer with large cards, no special software needed (not recommendable with cameras that are known buggy with regards to filesystem handling. Works great with Sony.): Label all the cards you have in use As soon as you are near a computer, insert SD card, rename the current DCIM folder meaningfully (with the card label ...


1

I find it hard to believe that an art store or craft store has noting that will do this trick. In the old days we used a scrap book and just pasted pictures using photo corners. You can make these with strips of paper. You can find photo double stick mounting tape. You can find spray adhesives that are labeled photo safe. Now most material warnings are for ...


1

To be clear, the Q-60 (a.k.a. IT8) is used to create a color profile of your scanner, not to calibrate the scanner. The scanner should calibrate itself on startup. Also, this will only provide a "close enough" process, since your archival scanning may include prints on various materials (matte, glossy, magazine, newspaper, etc.). In order for this to work ...


1

Format the drive using any file system that can be read and written by the operating systems you intend to use to access it. Consider using exFAT. It has widespread support across devices since it was adopted as the default file system for SDXC cards by the SD Card Association. Other file systems that can be used across operating systems include FAT32 and ...


1

You should consult a conservator. The print sounds like it is attached to a non-archival material, which is destroying the photograph. Start by asking at an art frame shop. The non-archival material must be removed from the photograph to prevent further deterioration. Simply sealing the photograph and offending cardboard in a bag together will not preserve ...


1

Epson P600 is getting very good reviews. I have a P800 which uses the same inks (in larger more cost effective cartridges, which was my reason for selecting the P800 over the P600 almost as much as print size) and I can attest to excellent color saturation and black levels which will surely produce satisfactory results. Archival stability for the Epson ...


1

I frequently use 3M Spray mount or similar for mounting photos. There is also a photo specific version that is slightly more friendly to the dies and such in theory. If you are laminating the result, really even something that is minimally tacky should work and might give a smoother result since it would be a thinner coat and only needs to hold it in ...


1

Wait, are you saying your images are already digital but only in the wrong resolution? In that case you should really skip the printing-to-rescan part and directly use e.g. ImageMagick's convert which can easily batch-convert all images to your desired resolution. Assuming you're using Linux and all images reside in a directory original (including ...


1

First, note that any Export in Lightroom is a RAW conversion***. So, attempting to get organization data from an export will result in getting that data into the JPG, but losing it in the RAW. A better solution is to use Smart Collections, and have them be generated on metadata that can be associated with both RAW and JPEG. Collections are convenient to ...


1

I would not trust any media that starts with a flat plastic disk and burns bits into it. CD, DVD, Blue-Ray, whatever is next. The track record for CDs and DVDs is bad, they go bad in as few as five years. I don't want to start using a media and finding out that it is as obsolete as a 8 inch floppy. Plastic disks are also dog slow. Hundreds or thousands of ...


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