35

The answer you found on Yahoo is mostly wrong. The basic statement (same as dpollitt's answer here) is correct — theoretically, image quality shouldn't degrade but a number of factors might make it worse. And the list of things that might go wrong is sound enough. But the mapping of symptoms to problems is very inaccurate. Point by point: One would be ...


33

Unlike a mirrored camera, there is little likelihood of the sensing system in a mirrorless camera suffering a catastrophic failure so it is really up to your "taste" to determine when a sensor is too old. The primary causes of degradation to a CMOS sensor array are heat, dye neutralization and cosmic rays. Thermal Degradation Normally thermal damage is so ...


18

An auto-focus motor is just what it sounds like: a small electric or piezoelectric ("ultrasonic") motor which moves the lens elements to facilitate autofocus. In some camera systems, this motor is in the camera body, and the lens moved by a physical coupling. However, you actually read some misinformation. Canon EOS cameras do not have a motor in the body, ...


16

Practically speaking, digital cameras do not lose quality over time. Some factors can come into play such as: Equipment can wear causing it to be out of spec Environmental factors such as dirt, sand, dust, moisture can degrade quality Heat or excessive use(causing heat) can cause all electronic devices to experience wear Other regular use issues from ...


16

I have an L lens that is 30 years old and still works fine. It's a fully manual lens however. Basically the glass and metal will not age, the only concern is the electronics. Whilst ICs don't really wear out, capacitors do age, I believe caps failing is one of the common causes for old electronics to stop working. I recently dug out my 1989 Nintendo gameboy,...


10

Hopefully you have wiped the stuff before turning the camera off, otherwise there is probably some of it inside it. There is nothing self-cleaning here and neither is this camera sealed against dust and particles from entering. It's a great camera you have, so I would bring it to Canon for a cleaning. They will take the camera apart and clean it. Here this ...


10

The residue left behind when your fingers touch the glass of your lens contains several organic and chemical compounds. Normal skin oil has a pH level of around 4 to 5.5, which is mildly acidic. The longer it is allowed to be in contact with materials reactive with acids, the more reaction will take place. And yes, acid will eat through the coatings on ...


9

When it is dirty, no more or less often than that. If you can't see any obvious dirt or fingerprints then don't touch the lens surface at all with anything. Every time you touch a lens element it's an opportunity for damage so it's not really worth it unless the dirt is visible in your output.


8

So, the common idea is that the UV filter helps to protect the lens element from damage. Stores love to push that concept, a lot, and I think it stems from trying to actually get rid of them in the digital age when it didn't really need them. They've now managed to create a sustained market for UV filters despite the fact the UV part of it is meaningless. ...


7

I would suggest taking your camera into a professional for camera cleaning. Who knows how serious the issue is - plus, I mean....termites...are you sure it isn't some other bug? Either way, I definitely wouldn't use any harsh chemicals or substances on my camera - I would rather spend a little money not to ruin such an expensive device...hence the advice to ...


6

Assuming you're just talking about the front element - I use these disposable Zeiss wipes. They do better than a lens pen (which handles dust ok, but doesn't do smudges nearly as well) and a box of 200 will last a long, long time with hobby level use. My local Walmart sells the box of 200 for under 4 dollars in the camera and the optometrist section. They ...


6

Spots like this are due to something on or very, very near the sensor. See Dust-like speck visible every few pictures — is it dust, or worse? for another example. Dust in or on the lens can't cause this problem, because, like lens scratches, they'll be so far out of focus that the effect is undetectable (in the same way a window screen becomes invisible when ...


6

Nikon cameras and lenses are covered by a 1 year warranty. Lenses have a 4 year extension of that warranty. If you have an issue under warranty it doesn't matter if it's in the 1st year or the 5th, the coverage will be the same. If a lens is repaired under warranty, there will be no charge for the repair - you will have to cover the cost of shipping the ...


5

I always leave the ball head attached to my Manfrotto tripod. It does have three little retaining screws holding it in place but even if it didn't I wouldn't be inclined to remove it unless I had a particular reason for doing so. My tripod mostly lives under the cargo net in the back of my car fully assembled and ready to go as and when I need it. This ...


5

Accidents! I would guess the average lifetime of handheld camera lenses is affected mostly by accidental damage that renders them unusable and beyond economic repair. Decades! For lenses that haven't been dropped, crushed burned or drowned, the average lifetime (in which they can be used to take photographs) is certainly measured in decades. I just tried ...


5

I am quite positive the AF/MF switch is broken. This has happened to a few friends of mine as well and can be fixed easily. If your lens is still under warranty, take it to a Canon service center. Though the other similar cases I have heard were mostly third party lenses (2 Tamrons and one Tokina) and it's a bit unusual for a Canon L glass, but, as I said, ...


5

The Lens Pen is my favorite first line of lens cleaning. This is a pen-shaped tool with a very light non-abrasive brush on one side and a powdered cleaning agent on the other. Always brush first to remove an particles from the lens surface. If there are marks stuck to the lens then I use the cleaning side to remove it. This is very effective and minimizes ...


5

It's not really a big deal for two reasons on both sides of the equation. On the one hand, dust on the lens is positioned at a place where it will have negligible impact on the final image. That's because they'll be completely out of focus, and are so tiny to begin with Generally, it's not worth worrying about. On the other hand, lens glass is very hard, ...


5

It sounds like keeping this printer alive is a burden that you don't even want to put on the shoulders of somebody else. Instead, use the situation to your advantage and the person taking care of your printer. print 1 test page per week Why would you want to print a test page? I will travel for half a year I'm sure there's somebody in your family or ...


4

Firstly, you should never 'clean' a lens with your finger! Try not to touch it at all if you can help it by using a rocket blower instead to expel dust and dirt flecks, but if you must physically touch it, use a non-scratch micro fibre lens cleaning cloth. These are quite cheap, available at any photographic retailer, and will not scratch your lens. That ...


4

Here are answers for your questions based on my YN-465 and all the research I did before getting it: What are most common issues that would require repair of a speedlite? The number one cause of speedlight damage is dropping it - if you drop it and you are unlucky it will break. The "professional" series (models 5xx) are supposedly much better at ...


4

About two years ago I bought a set of three YN460II flashes (only manual, no TTL) to use alongisde a Canon 430EXII, mostly for taking portraits. I bought them for about $40 each considering them pretty much disposable. To my surprise, all of them are still going strong. I have dropped them many times (by accident of course, not for fun!) and so far none of ...


4

If well maintained, I'd say 10+ years easy. Consumer lenses last until you drop them. L lenses are more expensive, so you have them repaired in that case. - Andy_T Lenses tend to become outdated before they actually wear out, and this is one of the reasons that people often recommend focusing on good lenses over a good body. Also, mountings change,...


4

Zooms wear a lot faster than fixe-focal length lenses (though internal focusing/floating element fixed focal length designs are more like zooms). Most of the lenses I use regularly are between 20 and 30 years old, and work just as well as when I bought them. One is probably due (or maybe even overdue) to be cleaned and lubed, but most of the others don't ...


4

Ensure that the padding is still in good condition and positioned to stop the camera / lens from moving around to much. To clean the outside of the bag a soft brush and some water should do the trick. As for the inside depending on the material type, a damp cloth or a can of compressed air should clear out any dust. If you have a small attachment you ...


4

Clean your lens when it needs it. Not any more complicated than that. The goal is to eliminate the chance that something on the lens will impact your photo. Due to how close the dust is to the lens, and the fact that you are focusing far from the dust, you will be surprised at how much dust makes very little to no impact. If you are concerned about ...


4

Since neck straps are more or less disposable most people don't mind if they break. Knock-offs can be had on ebay for a few dollars. The stock cannon ones last ages (I've had one for more than 5 years now and no issue aside from cosmetics). If you want to go the way of a 3rd party neck strap i reccomend the unfortunately named 'R-strap' from black-rapid. ...


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