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37

Your DSLR can do it in about 5 seconds each. You need a tripod, a piece of glass and a decent light. Try to come up with a way to work at table height. Aim the camera straight down. Put a flat board down, and make a right angle of masking tape. You can apply the tape directly to the table if you are absolutely sure it won't pull off the finish. Not a ...


30

For large collections (in the 1000s) outside services can be very expensive. Especially if you: A) want decent quality, B) don't want them shipped to another country for cheaper processing, and/or C) want to preserve the backs. Setting up a camera like in Sherwood Botsford's answer is rather labor intensive and has drawbacks of getting lighting perfectly ...


16

An alternative... If you have considered Sherwood Botsford's answer and it seems like a lot of work...well, you are not wrong, especially for larger archives. Consider finding a service to do this tedious, time-consuming, laborious, boring work for you. ScanCafe (for example) have a "Value Kit" option where they ship you a box, you fill it full of "Paper ...


8

The originals were that. The originals. Obviously you tried to keep the negatives in a safe manner because the nitrates and films were very flammable, could being eaten by fungus, decolor, or all kind of things. Even in remastering on movies like Star Wars they went for the original negatives, which were in bad shape. In feature films after the original ...


7

Processed film does deteriorate, but not at such a rate that surviving 10-15 years would be remarkable! It also depends on the type of film; black & white film lasts longer than colour film for example. (Indeed, when film studios want to store an old colour movie, they separate the colour film into its R, G and B channels, and record each channel ...


7

'Photography files' are no different to any other kind of file. Use NTFS (because it allows for larger files and is generally the newer, better system) and the default allocation unit size - a larger size will make virtually no noticeable performance difference in a modern hard drive.


6

Simple: so that when looking at the front of the print file sheet, the image appears correctly. The emulsion side of the film was the side facing the lens, the side receiving the image to expose. By inserting the emulsion side down, you are looking at the back of the image, just as you saw it through the lens, in the same orientation it was in the camera. ...


4

Use NTFS unless you plan on connecting this drive to a system which only supports FAT. Also, set the Allocation Unit Size as high as possible per http://www.howtogeek.com/136078/what-should-i-set-the-allocation-unit-size-to-when-formatting/ For a media disk where you photos, music and videos are stored, every file is at least 1MB I use the biggest AUS. ...


3

Is this normal? It might be "normal" in the sense that your hardware isn't broken, but you'll very likely get a better result with better equipment. Am I overthinking this and these "defects" are actually unimportant? That depends on how much the photos and the scans mean to you. If the photos are fairly stable now and you feel like you'll be able to ...


3

May I suggest HEIF? HEIF is the replacement for both JPEG and JPEG2000. It is effectively a single H.265 frame. Don't store single-frame H.265 movies! Instead, use the proper file format that has been designed to use the same algorithms that H.265 uses.


3

Any moderate-level compact camera should do just fine. In fact, since you note that you don't need very high quality, they should be more than fine. For the two issues you raise: Make sure you are using Macro mode and focus should be no problem. Most compact cameras use a focus technology which is somewhat slow but very accurate. They also all include ...


2

There is some useful info on this from Kodak here: Storage and Care of KODAK Photographic Materials Quoting from this Kodak publication: "Glass mounts do not have any significant effect on the useful life of slides except to help protect them from dirt and scratches. (Before you mount slides in glass mounts, be sure that the glass surfaces are clean.) ...


2

Most of the smartphones cameras can do the job. In conjunction with amazing apps like Evernote or Google Drive you can achieve the same goal that you are looking for and save a few steps in the process. I recommend create a nice place with good light and firm board in order to avoid those distortions. Again the smartphone camera is a good tool for that. I ...


2

It certainly depends on quality of processing, film brand, gasses in the storage area and other factors, but in general, 10-15 years should not be a big deal. There may be some color shifts but it should be possible to fix them during or after scanning. Humidity may be a problem. Check the films for spots, stains etc.


2

If you want long archivability characteristics then you should stick to regular B&W film. XP2 is chromogenic film which uses dyes during development to produce the image. These dyes do fade out with time. There was a research that I read once about color negative films life and I believe (not sure though) it was red dye who start fading first, I can't ...


2

I would like to send them to scan by a professional laboratory but I would rather not hire the service should they not be still good. The results will be a function of both the quality of the negatives and the quality of the service. A sensible approach would be to start with a small test batch and see how they do. Even if they negatives have deteriorated ...


2

Archive requirements for film generally err on the cautious side. A couple of years ago I had all my colour negatives scanned. These spanned the period 1971-2003, and had been stored in a variety of places and conditions, many of them far from ideal. While I had a small percentage of failures, these tended to be physical damage to the frames, rather than ...


2

You could get a hosting with mysql (costs about 50 $/year) and install a good php gallery. A good one could be for example coppermine gallery. But there are manymore. Supports multiple uploads, usually you dont have space limits with those hostings, easy to use, supports galleries, user, rights, hidden galleries and a Whole lot more. Personally I would go ...


2

You can convert images to DNG in Lightroom using Library > Convert Photo to DNG. It has the option to use lossy compression and delete RAW files after conversion. Much quicker than exporting as JPG and importing. (Apparently Lightroom is also faster in working with images in the DNG format). It produces DNGs of about 8-12 MB (from my camera's 25-30MB ...


2

Put them the safest place you can, but even the safest place is never "safe." Remember the Jacques Lowe case? Had extended exclusive access behind the scenes of the Kennedy administration. Put his treasure trove of negs in the toughest vault he could find. In the basement of the World Trade Center.


2

Extended FAT is now one of the most adopted format for external disks that have to deal with different operating systems as Mac and Linux


2

I'm not really sure what you need as an answer here. To answer exactly what you asked, Yes to scanning, sorting would be a premium. Probably better to do that yourself. You would probably be far better at this than a 3rd party, as you will know Aunt Edna is younger than Granny Weatherwax but older than Cousin Itt, & be able to timeline based on those ...


1

I think there are a lot of solutions, but I can't say I know the best one. As you use Apple devices mostly I'll describe the full Apple solution below. You indicate that this seems like a bad idea. But given that you use Apple devices mainly I think it's the path of least resistance (neglecting cost). Please note that I don't have mobile Apple devices, nor ...


1

Specifically with reference to JPEG2000, this page lists several other alternatives. I've used jasper some, but haven't played with the rest, so I can't specifically recommend any particular one.


1

You've too many questions to answer easily, but generally speaking, I'd have to say YES to all of them. I think Caleb had the best approach. I have been scanning for many different types of jobs, and they all needed something "special" - the client needed it special! Go to Ebay, and find a new or used scanner that has high specs (scan ratios, variable output,...


1

I can not recommend any scanner. It has been some time since I use one. But one thing to keep an eye on would be dynamic range. This will give you the ability to see details on the shadows and avoid blowing the light areas. https://www.google.com/search?q=dynamic+range+on+a+scanner


1

While I'm sure a proper photo scanner like the ones bucknljake suggests are significantly better in terms of quality, I've archived a bunch of old photos just by putting them in the feeder of one of the big scanner / printer things at my office (the one I used was Konica Minolta C554, FWIW!) Whilst the quality probably wasn't the greatest and there were ...


1

Format the drive using any file system that can be read and written by the operating systems you intend to use to access it. Consider using exFAT. It has widespread support across devices since it was adopted as the default file system for SDXC cards by the SD Card Association. Other file systems that can be used across operating systems include FAT32 and ...


1

Any scanner will do provided it can scan transparencies as well as photographs. I have not run Linux since the days of the very early Red Hat distributions. I cannot help with scanning software. In the non-Linux world I would suggest something professional in the way of scanning software such as Silverfast. Vuescan is also an excellent piece of software and ...


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