22

Most DSLR cameras have a sign on the top (Plimsoll mark) which looks sort of like The line indicates the position of the sensor plane. I googled for pictures of the 600D. It also has this indicator on the left side of the camera top.


13

Canon lists the body-only mass of the 60D at 675 grams and the 600D at 515 grams. These numbers are without batteries. Include the batteries and the 60D is the 755g you quote in your question, but the 600D is only 540g. The 60D chassis is polycarbonate resin (plastic) with glass fiber on an aluminum chassis and moderately weather sealed. The 600D chassis is ...


11

The T4i camera body is basically identical to the T5i, the T4i is discontinued because there's no reason to build both. Older models are usually discontinued, there's no issue in getting one, the T4i is still a relatively new camera and is fully supported (and the pictures it takes are just as good as they were before it was discontinued).


11

I live in Sweden and I own a Canon EOS 450D. So far I've never had any problems with it in temperatures down to -20 °C (apart from a somewhat reduced battery life). I wouldn't really worry about your camera not working at sub zero. Every swede I know uses his/her camera in the winter (as well as their cell phones and other electric toys) and to the best of ...


11

As far as I know there are two possible solutions. I will explain both of them below. EOS utility This software is supplied with your camera. It can be downloaded from the internet, but it's a hassle. It's better if you install it from the CD and update it. When you have it on your computer do the following: Connect your camera through USB. Start EOS ...


10

This is kind of a tough question, as there are various different aspects of Canon DPP and Lightroom/ACR that offer both pros and cons for each tool. Both DPP and LR/ACR will produce better results than Picasa, which while it does support RAW conversion, is not a top of the line tool explicitly designed for converting RAW files (it's more of a photo ...


10

You'll never regret buying the focus confirm adapter once you forget how much you had to pay for it :-). "Auto confirm" is akin to "poor man's AF", and allows you to achieve, in many cases, close to AF results with far less effort or thought or concentration than pure MF takes in extreme conditions. With auto-confirm you have to "think" a lot less and can ...


9

I know the answers are quite complete, but I still have something to add. The main reason I went for the 600D was the flip LCD, because I'm quite small and it makes it easier to take shots of things higher up, I otherwise wouldn't reach (and a wannabe-periscope on urban explorations). It's although useful for taking close ups of things close to the ground ...


9

Here is a simple how-to guide for attaching your DSLR to a telescope. With photos, and links to external information on related topics. tl;dr: You need a T-ring (or T-mount) to adapt your DSLR to the T-adapter, which slides into the telescope in place of the regular eyepiece. As you are going to be taking photos of vary distant objects with long exposures,...


9

Just set a black and white picture style but keep the file type set to raw. See this post for more information: Do different "Picture styles" affect RAW output?


8

This can be accomplished pretty easily just using an Eye-Fi SD card (a standard SD card with a built in wi-fi transmitter) and the corresponding Eye-Fi app on your iPhone. The app connects to the card via an ad-hoc network allowing the photos to be transferred. Eye-Fi cards start around €20 and the app is free on the App Store. More information on the ...


8

In order to use the rear LCD to compose pictures (as opposed to using the optical viewfinder), you must put your camera into "Live View" mode. On the 600D (and all other recent Canon SLRs), this is done by pressing the button marked with a camera icon and a red dot which is just to the right of the viewfinder: It is worth noting that using the rear LCD ...


7

The bigger the pixels, the less noise there is. This is a matter of physics. More light gets accumulated in each pixel and so it take more noise to appear significant. The 600D and 7D have APS-C sensors which are small and have a high megapixels count. This makes their pixels comparatively smaller than the 5D Mark II which has a larger sensor and hence ...


7

The Live View screen will by default try to 'mimic' the exposure you're likely to get with the settings you have dialled in. So in dim light with ISO 100, a fast shutter speed, and a small aperture, you will likely just see a black screen. When you half press the shutter the camera brightens it up while it meters the scene and so you can see what you're ...


7

The camera will automatically record this information in the JPEG file, but not as a picture of numbers superimposed on the image. Some cameras have a feature to do this, but I don't think yours does. That's not necessarily bad, because doing it that way means you have part of the image covered by numbers and you can't get a clean image if you change your ...


7

The good news is that cameras rarely get damaged by cold, even considerably below their operating limit which is 0C for nearly all DSLRs except some from Pentax. The bad news is that they stop working quickly. How quickly depends on the ambient temperature and particular camera. What fails first is the batter which looses it ability to supply current while ...


7

No The 600D uses the built in pop-up flash for the focus assist light, the pop-up flash pops up too close the the external flash if one is connected - there are many external flashes and accessories that would be hit by the popup flash if it tried to open when they are connected. So, as a safeguard the camera will not open the popup flash if there is ...


7

Yes, it can - the option you're after is "auto exposure bracketing" (AEB), which can most easily be configured from the quick menu - select the meter (the -3 to +3 scale), press "SET", then turn the control wheel. At this point, the little indicator marker should split into three, which will mean that the next three shots the camera takes will have normal ...


7

It seems like you have mirror lockup enabled. The first full press of the shutter button will cause the mirror to move up (just as it does before taking a normal photo using the viewfinder) but the shutter will not be opened. A second full press of the shutter button will activate the shutter to take the photo. If the shutter is not pressed again for 30 ...


7

If I were you, I'd go ahead and buy another battery on Amazon. If a new battery fixes it, dispose of your old one, and you're good for $15. If not, it might be an internal problem and you'd probably have to send it to Canon. Edit Per OP's comment, the problem seems to have been narrowed down to whether the memory card is inserted or not. Try it with a new ...


6

Pretty sure you only have one choice for that price. Luckily, it's a good and reputable one for portraits and general low-light usage. They call it the nifty fifty: Canon EF 50mm F/1.8 II. The bright F/1.8 aperture lets it shoot in low light and also gives a shallow depth-of-field which is often used in portraits. Plus, the 50mm focal-length, equivalent to ...


6

The 18-55mm lens in the first (cheapest) kit is a "standard zoom", an equivalent to the classic 28-80mm zoom for film SLRs. It's versatile range being wide enough at 18mm for most landscape and interior shots, and long enough at 55mm to shoot tight portraits (head and shoulders) whilst being a comfortable distance from your subject (which also avoids any ...


6

You are almost certainly seeing a JPEG preview file. Even if you only save RAW files, the vast majority of cameras generate a preview or thumbnail JPEG and that is what you see on the LCD on the back of your camera. RAW files contain monochromatic luminance values for each photosite. Since the sensor is masked with a pattern of filters that allow different ...


6

Yes, you may use the MP-E 65mm lens on a Canon T3. No, you do not need any adapters. Just realize that the MP-E 65 is a different type of lens than what you are probably used to. Not only is it a manual focus only lens, but at each magnification setting there is only a single distance the lens is capable of focusing. The way most users focus is to set the ...


6

You expected it to be better because people tend to think, bigger = better. People talk about how great full frame is without understanding what is really different, and your expectations are too great. Sensitivity and Noise Full-frame sensors have larger sensels than crop sensors that produce the same number of megapixels. For sensors of the same ...


5

MapAPic is an iPhone app that lets you geotag your locations, and create a searchable list of locations, along with multiple pictures, tags, etc. I think it does exactly what you need. Disclaimer: I am the author of the app :)


5

I don't know about you but my smartphone just doesn't have the battery life to make this work. I therefore use a standalone GPS device made by Holux. It's Bluetooth-capable and transmits the GPS coordinates to a Foolography Unleashed device attached to my camera. The Holux device runs the whole day on a single charge, and with this setup all my images ...


5

Is it worth is a difficult question to answer as it depends greatly on what you would be using it for. There are a few primary areas of differences to review: AF The AF system has been upgraded to a 9-point cross-type. This means that you can accurately focus using any of the 9 AF points and they will work together to determine a solid focus. On the T3i, ...


5

FD lenses are designed to sit closer to the film/sensor than EF lenses - so there is no adapter that can just place the lens in the correct location (because the correct location is inside the camera where the mirror is). This leaves us with to options: Adapter that places the lens farther than it's supposed to be - this has the same effect as placing the ...


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