13

Canon lists the body-only mass of the 60D at 675 grams and the 600D at 515 grams. These numbers are without batteries. Include the batteries and the 60D is the 755g you quote in your question, but the 600D is only 540g. The 60D chassis is polycarbonate resin (plastic) with glass fiber on an aluminum chassis and moderately weather sealed. The 600D chassis is ...


12

There is a little microswitch in the hotshoe that detects an external flash -- this may have become stuck, or got a piece of grit blocking it. If you cannot see anything under the rails, you may have to take it to your local friendly Canon authorised repair centre, but if you can see some grit, you may be able to carefully remove it with a cocktail stick or ...


11

Aperture: Use the maximum aperture (F1.8 if possible) Shutter Speed: Use the 600/(focal length * crop Factor)rule so as to not see star trails (Refer here in section 3. Camera settings). ISO: Highest possible for your camera that you find acceptable. Milky Way? You can use the application: Stellarium to find out if you are in the right time / place to view ...


9

I haven't used it, but I know that battery drain with aftermarket grips is a common complaint on photography forums. And people with genuine Canon and Nikon units always reply that they have no such issues. I would say it's a defect with that particular unit. You could try a 2nd Vello grip and you may find it works well. It shouldn't drain the batteries ...


9

Most cameras are more weatherproof than their manufacturers let on. The problem is that most users expect that "weatherproof" means it'll be ok if left out in a rainstorm like a forgotten toy, which is very much not true. In my experience, any camera will easily survive a light snowstorm or light misting rain while slung over your shoulder or around the ...


9

Basically no. Canon offers varying degrees of weather sealing on their cameras and the 60D has some sealing, but I would not use it in rain, beyond a light mist. They do make bags you can put around your camera and lens if absolutely necessary. You can get an idea of where the 60D is sealed in this review (callout near the bottom) http://www.imaging-...


9

There is no official successor anywhere, people deduce it based on model numbers. For the 50D, the 60D is the numeric successor and it does supersede it in most features. A few were lost which is why some people say that 60D is not the right successor. This does happen from time-to-time. The 7D is a much higher-end camera and is really for a different-...


9

It is "lens flare" in the first, but in the second, it is the reflection of the black internal parts of the front of your lens which are illuminated by the direct sun reflecting off the inside of your UV filter.


9

Because of the 60Da's modification to increase IR sensitivity for astrophotography, if you plan on using the camera for regular visible-light photography, you probably should get an IR cut filter, otherwise you may experience color shifts when the sensor gathers both visible and non-visible light together (magenta cast with synthetic fabrics, and foliage ...


8

Generally speaking I think the concept of "lenses that don't focus well on body X" is a misconception. All mechanical and electronic gear is manufactured to certain tolerances...and usually, the more expensive, the tighter the tolerances. If you get two pieces of equipment that are at opposing ends of their range of tolerance, you might end up having to ...


8

You don't tend to get telescopes designed for a particular camera, what you need to look for is a telescope camera mount for your 60D. This is a device which replaces the eye piece on the telescope with an EF mount which the camera is connected to instead of a normal lens. The adapter usually consists of two parts. A 'T' adapter which fits directly onto the ...


8

Both the Canon 60D and the 700D/T5i are built around the same basic sensor: Canon's 18MP APS-C sensor with 4.3µm pixel pitch. It has also appeared in the T2i/550D, T3i/600D, T4i/650D,SL1/100D, EOS M, and 7D. When shooting RAW and editing on a computer any of these cameras can use the latest updates to Canon's demosaicing algorithms and image processing that ...


7

You can use Magic Lantern for Canon 60D to set the bulb timer for very long exposures (up to 8h). I've personally done this for upto a minute in this photo. Here is the link to Magic Lantern


7

I believe this is one of the modes you enable by pressing the INFO button. If you repeatedly press INFO to cycle through all the display modes you will eventually arrive back to the default mode which turns the LCD off.


7

It's because of your shooting mode. You will need to be in P, Tv, Av, M or A-DEP modes. Source: http://learn.usa.canon.com/app/pdfs/quickguides/CDLC_EOS-Integrated-Speedlite-Transmitter_QuickGuide.pdf


7

This is just me, but use what you've got until you know what you need. Your inexperience and lack of knowledge are likely to be far bigger stumbling blocks to getting the image quality you want than the gear. Things like megapixels and frame rates, etc. all make less difference than messageboard discussions make it out to be. Lower-end gear tends to look ...


6

You have pretty much done your homework, 50mm f/1.4 and 17-50 f/2.8 makes a good combination for indoor usage, one giving you better range for group shots, and another better portraits with shallow DOF and neither one breaking your bank balance! However, for portraits, instead of the 50mm you could try a 85mm f/1.8 (price range almost same) which is a very ...


6

SD vs SDHC vs SDXC has only to do with capacity with respective maximums of 2 GB, 32 GB and 2 TB. This impacts the file-system used on those cards (FAT, FAT32 and exFAT, respecitvely) and which devices are compatible with them. Performance is governed by the transfer rate of each card. These are either represented by MB/s or by class. For performance of the ...


5

I'm very much in favor of the prime-lens-only approach to photography. I don't have anything in general against zooms; I just think a small set of prime lenses makes a nice way of working. (See this question and answer for more behind that way of thinking.) But, on an 1.6x-crop APS-C DSLR like the Canon 60D, 50mm does not provide an ideal single lens. It's ...


5

I think there is an 18-135mm kit option - that would be good for a starter zoom. But if money allows, then I'd recommend the EF-S 17-55mm f/2.8 IS USM. This is not new to market - but I am putting it out there as an option. It's a stonking good lens. Almost the same focal range as the standard kit 18-55, but with L series optics (though Canon will never ...


5

I'm going to step around the discussion of the 17-55 EF-S lens and its comparison to an L lens as thats a loaded question that has lots of heated debate surrounding it. To address the meat of your question which I take as 'I want to upgrade to an L lens, which one?' that depends on what you're looking for in a lens. Unfortunately there isn't a single L ...


5

The EF-S 17-55 f/2.8 isn't an "L" lens -- that's absolutely true. Before dismissing it, though, I think it's important to remember that Canon won't label any EF-S lens an "L" since it wouldn't work on their pro bodies. The performance of the lens, though, is considered to be excellent -- definitely competitive with "L" offerings, and very possibly even ...


5

The flash will not automatically activate in all camera modes as some leave the decision up to the user when you are exercising a degree of manual control. If you are in manual for example it will only fire when you specifically turn it on by popping it up. More specifically for the 60D, on page 129 of your manual it indicates In Creative Zone modes, ...


5

The 430EXII supports Canon's now older method of remote flash triggering, which uses flash pulses from the commanding unit to trigger the remote unit (430EX in this case). The newer system, based on radio, is supported by the 600EX-RT, and ST-E3-RT units. Your system uses flash pulses, which fire BEFORE the shutter opens. So, even though you are seeing the ...


5

If you have Magic Lantern installed you can check the shutter count on your 60D. All you need to do is install Magic Lantern on your EOS, press MENU and then DISP. The shutter count will appear at the bottom of the screen. Another way to find the shutter count on many EOS models, including the 60D, is to use ShutterCount. You can download it from the ...


5

It sounds like your control wheel is "locked" - press the button underneath it called "unlock" This should now let you control the aperture.


4

Short answer.....NO. Not at that price point. A better option is this astrophotography bundle from Orion: http://www.telescope.com/Astrophotography/Astrophotography-Solutions/Orion-Adventures-in-Astrophotography-Bundle/pc/-1/c/4/sc/59/p/27154.uts It includes an equatorial mount and tripod, and a motor drive, for around $160. Attach your camera and get ...


4

I own two Canon EOS bodies, a 450D and a 7D. I did quite a bit of research on battery grips for the 450D some time ago, and settles on a Zeikos brand one. I was extremely happy with it. The build quality was superb, the grip rubber was nice and grippy, and very similar to the native grip of the camera body, and it offered all of the features of a Canon brand ...


4

No. On the 430EX product page it says: Compatible Cameras: All Canon EOS cameras... Compatibility between Speedlites and bodies is very good within the Canon world. You don't always get 100% of all features, but the reason for this is generally obvious. For example, older bodies cannot program the radio trigger in the new 600EX-RT from within the camera'...


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