13

Canon lists the body-only mass of the 60D at 675 grams and the 600D at 515 grams. These numbers are without batteries. Include the batteries and the 60D is the 755g you quote in your question, but the 600D is only 540g. The 60D chassis is polycarbonate resin (plastic) with glass fiber on an aluminum chassis and moderately weather sealed. The 600D chassis is ...


10

It is "lens flare" in the first, but in the second, it is the reflection of the black internal parts of the front of your lens which are illuminated by the direct sun reflecting off the inside of your UV filter.


9

There is no official successor anywhere, people deduce it based on model numbers. For the 50D, the 60D is the numeric successor and it does supersede it in most features. A few were lost which is why some people say that 60D is not the right successor. This does happen from time-to-time. The 7D is a much higher-end camera and is really for a different-...


9

Because of the 60Da's modification to increase IR sensitivity for astrophotography, if you plan on using the camera for regular visible-light photography, you probably should get an IR cut filter, otherwise you may experience color shifts when the sensor gathers both visible and non-visible light together (magenta cast with synthetic fabrics, and foliage ...


8

Both the Canon 60D and the 700D/T5i are built around the same basic sensor: Canon's 18MP APS-C sensor with 4.3µm pixel pitch. It has also appeared in the T2i/550D, T3i/600D, T4i/650D,SL1/100D, EOS M, and 7D. When shooting RAW and editing on a computer any of these cameras can use the latest updates to Canon's demosaicing algorithms and image processing that ...


7

This is just me, but use what you've got until you know what you need. Your inexperience and lack of knowledge are likely to be far bigger stumbling blocks to getting the image quality you want than the gear. Things like megapixels and frame rates, etc. all make less difference than messageboard discussions make it out to be. Lower-end gear tends to look ...


5

The 430EXII supports Canon's now older method of remote flash triggering, which uses flash pulses from the commanding unit to trigger the remote unit (430EX in this case). The newer system, based on radio, is supported by the 600EX-RT, and ST-E3-RT units. Your system uses flash pulses, which fire BEFORE the shutter opens. So, even though you are seeing the ...


5

If you have Magic Lantern installed you can check the shutter count on your 60D. All you need to do is install Magic Lantern on your EOS, press MENU and then DISP. The shutter count will appear at the bottom of the screen. Another way to find the shutter count on many EOS models, including the 60D, is to use ShutterCount. You can download it from the ...


5

It sounds like your control wheel is "locked" - press the button underneath it called "unlock" This should now let you control the aperture.


4

It is called Lens Flare. This is caused by strong light sources, such as the Sun in your two examples, that are either just outside the Angle of View of the camera lens or in the framing of your scene. Some of the light from the source of the flare is bouncing around inside your lens and reflecting off the surfaces of the lens elements. If the light source ...


4

The flash will not automatically activate in all camera modes as some leave the decision up to the user when you are exercising a degree of manual control. If you are in manual for example it will only fire when you specifically turn it on by popping it up. More specifically for the 60D, on page 129 of your manual it indicates In Creative Zone modes, ...


4

This is how Canon DSLRs work, in Av and Tv modes the camera exposes for the ambient light and only uses the flash for fill. To use the flash as the main light source you have to use full auto or P mode. or - the best options is to do what you did and use M mode, in manual mode with the built in flash or an external flash in TTL mode you can use the shutter ...


4

I believe that the "obvious" change here should not be underestimated. After my recent switch from APS-C (Canon) to full frame (Nikon) even with the brand change and the different user interface my biggest challenge are implications of DOF and the fact that because of that the focusing needs to be much more exact.


3

As already pointed out none of them would be considered more "pro" than the other by working photographers. There are differencies though and I list some of the advantages of the 60D below: 60D has a pentaprism (instead of a pentamirror in the 700D) which is a lot better (it's brighter) albeit heavier. 60D has a larger viewfinder which makes omposing and ...


3

This behavior is perfectly normal for a Canon 60D, and most other Canon EOS bodies. When you select Av Mode with E-TTL in lower light environments, the camera assumes you want to expose the entire scene correctly for the ambient light and then use the flash to illuminate your subject in the foreground. If you wish to disable this slow sync feature, use ...


3

It probably makes a bit more sense to think about Canon's product line as branching and merging over time, rather than maintaining a static relationship from top to bottom. The x0D line used to sit neatly between Canon's consumer-oriented Rebel (in the US) line and their 1D line for pros. Just as the Rebels branched into lesser Rebels and greater Rebels (...


3

No sadly it isn't. I had a 40D and sold it when I upgraded it to the 60D. Strange how it still doesn't feel like an upgrade lol :)


3

Image sharpness is more a function of the lens than the body. The Canon 60d and the 24-105L F/4L are both capable of shooting stock-acceptable imagery. I used the 24-105 as my wide angle lens for a while and I really like it a lot. In the case of the pelican image, the focus seems to be on the wall between the two pelicans on the right, not on the pelicans,...


3

If pulling the cord of the RS60-E3 out of the camera jack solves the problem then the problem is not in the camera, it is with the RS60-E3. What happens if you immediately plug the cord back in? Does the shutter open back up for another exposure? It sounds like the shutter button is just getting stuck and takes a while to fully release. If you only recently ...


3

The lens you are currently using looks to be doing fine. Adding "oomph" to your photos is all about the size and direction of the light as well as using a more appropriate background, and not about buying a more expensive lens. Since I couldn't say it any better myself, I'll include this quote from mattdm he posted in the comments below: I would put it ...


2

The EF-S 15-85mm f/3.5-5.6 IS lens is a perfect example of a lens that attempts to be too much of too many different things and as a result doesn't do much of anything as well as a more limited lens can. For a detailed look at the lens, please see: What's wrong with the Canon EF-S 15-85mm? That being the case, it's not likely anyone will come up with ...


2

Well you could always install "Magic Lantern". Using ML you could set a time for ur "Bulb" mode like 5min 10min etc. Then press shutter and go drink coffee, eat something, hang out etc and come back to have photo taken for you. I did a 5 min exposure without a problem with my old 7D I'd assume it'd be no problem for 60D. With ML you also get a lot of ...


2

In your current position I would trade the two lenses you have for the EF 70-200mm f/4 L telephoto lens and then buy a Tamron AF 17-50mm f/2.8 Di II to cover the wide-to-normal zoom range. Looking at the link to your sample photos, I see a lot of photos that appear to be taken at wider angles of view than you can get at 24mm on an APS-C body. If you give up ...


2

To the best of my knowledge there is no way to take multiple images with a single press of the button using any of Canon's IR remote shutter releases such as the RC-6. This is because a constant signal from the remote would deplete the battery supplying the energy for the remote very quickly. On the other hand, almost every wired remote I've ever seen ...


2

The 60D is probably still below the pro-sumer level, but it is closer due to the larger and clearer pentaprism OVF, the better weather sealing, the much longer battery life, the higher bit depth, and the faster max shutter speed. The image sensors themselves may be relatively close, but a sensor isn't all that makes a camera. The usability and durability ...


2

Your flash is probably set as slave. Check the switch for master/slave/off next to the flash shoe. It should be set to off, when it is mounted to a camera or to master when it actually masters other ETTL slaves. But unless it really is a slave, mastered by another ETTL master, then it should not be set to slave.


2

Go into the Live View Settings menu (red tab no.4) and turn Silent Shooting off. Then the flash will fire. For some reason silent shooting is not compatible with 3rd party speedlites.


2

No, the pop-up flash on your camera has to fire to be a wireless master for the off-camera 430EXII. The camera body and the flash communicate with light pulses ("pre-flashes"), so there will always be some firing of visible light pulses from the master. You can set the pop-up flash not to contribute light to the image. But light pulses are needed to set ...


2

Focusing screens for cameras with autofocus tend to be - almost per definition - optimized for use with autofocus lenses, which tend to be relatively "slow" with an aperture in the f/3.5-5.6 range. In olden days, focusing screens were optimized for fast, manual-focus screens, but those screens had the downside that they grew unusably dark when used with such ...


2

I have used camera info v1.2 writen by Magic_h200. The utility is great to retrieve some info. The more interesting was the shutter count. My utility is based on, with a access to edit owner, artist and copyright text. You can also synchronise the date/time of the canera within the local time on pc. I am Mourad Mkhakh the author of this tool. This is the new ...


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