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15

These are known as Chromatic Aberrations or Colour Fringing. These predominantly occur around areas with high contrast such as sharp edges in photographs or around the white water bottle and dark background in your case. A wider apeture can affect the lenses sensitivity to aberrations although certain lenses can see this "effect" vary depending on focal ...


10

The Tamron is known to be optically very good and sharp wide open across the frame. I know semi pro Nikon users who use that one on a crop camera for e.g. wedding shots. The F number on your kit number is only F3.5 on the widest and if you go into Av and keep an eye on it, you see it drops very quickly to F5-5.6. The range 2.8 - 4 is a stop (double the ...


9

That is the price because that is how much enough customers are willing to pay for it. While they are complex lenses, they are not high quality ones (the Nikon is sharper with more distortions) and both are quite dim on the long end. The price is for convenience of changing lenses less often, or not all all. After all, comfort and convenience are very ...


8

A Tamron lens is my preferred option as I used to have one for my old Minolta when I used 35mm film. That's all well and good; I'm sure Tamron appreciates your brand loyalty. That being said, there are a plethora of good lenses made by Tamron, Canon, Sigma, etc., and a plethora of absolute garbage lenses. Do your homework on a specific lens - the brand ...


7

It is hard to make a zoom lens that is sharp and open enough the entire focal range without tunnel vision and lens distortion. So the larger the range span is the more difficult it is to keep the quality equal. That's why the fixed focal length lenses still exist. You can get amazing quality compared to your zoom lenses for a small price, at the cost of ...


7

Is there a reason why Canon and Nikon allow third party makers to make lens that provide similar specs to first-party lens such are AF, IS and aperture control when they sell for less? Controlling a product line that has the support of many third parties is much more profitable than trying to build and sell every product yourself. Canon and Nikon don't just ...


6

The lens has a maximum magnification of 1:3.7, or 0.27 (augh, editing! The decimal number is created by dividing the first number by the last, and I got it super wrong) so it's really not that good a macro lens. By comparison, your current lens's maximum magnification is either 0.28 or 0.34 depending on whether it's the IS one or not, so it's actually higher....


6

There are repair shops that will give you an estimate of repair cost, or even better a no obligation quote. Then it's a simple case of comparing the repair cost with the used value of the equipment (trawling ebay is a good avenue for this), giving a slight bias toward repair to make up for the risk of buying used.


6

Cheap isn't good and good isn't cheap. Good can be reasonably priced though, for events basically you never want your lowest aperture to be above f4 if you can avoid it, otherwise you'll be looking to use flash, which if you're trying to remain stealthy and go for candids will draw the attention to you. I'd recommend looking at something like the Sigma 50-...


6

Tamron 17-50 f/2.8 VC/Non-VC comes in mind. Both are cheap and have okay image quality. f/2.8 allows you to shoot indoor while keeping your ISO to a reasonable range. This is a good lens. The Non-VC (VC = Vibration Compensation, similar to IS) version has slightly better sharpness and contrast comparing to the VC version, but Tamrons VC is a good thing to ...


6

Comparing two very similar lenses like the Sigma 18-50mm f/2.8 EX DC Macro and the Tamron 17-50mm f2.8 SP XR Di II LD VC Lens in terms of sharpness can be difficult. Often one lens will perform better at a particular focal length and aperture, while the other will perform better at other focal length and aperture combinations. Even at the same focal length ...


6

Neither of those lenses are really what most macro specialists would consider a macro lens. For a lens to be considered a true macro lens it should be able to project a life sized image of the subject onto the image sensor or film. If you're taking a picture of a 20mm long bug, a macro lens should be able to focus close enough to project an image of the bug ...


6

The Tamron SP 85mm f/1.8 Di VC was introduced in 2016. The Nikon 85mm f/1.8G was introduced in 2012. Most lenses settle into a lower street price a few months after their introduction than the price they command when first introduced. It's still very early to see where the long term price of the Tamron will settle. The most obvious difference is the ...


5

For 'fast action photography' - I'd imagine you'd want something with the 'ultra sonic' focus - its much faster than the old motors in lenses. If you're stuck to Canon, that means 'USM' lens. For 3rd party lenses, it means 'HSM' for Sigma and 'USD' for Tamron. Unless you need that extreme 28-300mm range, I'd also consider something with a faster ...


5

With an adapter (The Nikon FT1), yes. As a native lens, no. (There are no third party lenses for the Nikon 1 system yet.) Assuming you have the newer version of that lens with a built-in focus motor, it should autofocus and everything. It's my understanding that there is an older version of the same lens that relies on the camera body to have an AF motor; ...


5

They're red LEDs under the cover. I removed the cover from my 430 EX and whilst it works better (with all lenses, on account of producing a brighter, sharper grid pattern) the light is still red. Here's what it looks like without the cover: http://mattgrum.com/photo_se/430EXII_leds.jpg It's worth noting that you can in theory remove and replace the cover ...


5

TL/DR: You want to look for "for Canon" in the description; and stick with Di and Di II lenses and stay away from Di III. The easiest way to make sure a Sigma/Tamron/Tokina or other 3rd-party lens works with your 60D is to make sure they're in the Canon mount, and that they're new/current versions, or firmware upgradeable to be current. The one big issue ...


4

The lenses are a fairly straight forward an economic decision. The camera perhaps less so as various things wear out and fixing one thing MAY leave another fail soon afdter. Or not. If the glass is good and the lens is not physically beaten to death then you can get a quote for repair and see how the cost compares to a new or equivalent lens. I had a ...


4

Go with the Canon 70-200mm F/4L, its image quality is vastly superior. That is the lens I still use for professional sport photography. Stabilization does nothing for moving subjects, in order to freeze action in sports even 1/200s is too slow, you often need to shoot around 1/1000s which is fast enough to give your a perfectly sharp image without ...


4

When taking pictures babies have two annoying tendencies: They move a lot, and they run at the camera. Fast shutter speeds and the ability to change framing gives a preference for a f2.8 zoom. I don't know how fast the Tamron focuses, but if you are going to use it at f2.8, I sure hope it focuses fast. Children move a lot in unexpected directions. I really ...


4

Any of those lenses will be fairly comparable. They all have their positives and negatives... I have the Nikkor lens which I picked up as my first zoom in that range to use on film and it is what it is, it's built to a price and that shows. It's not the sharpest at 300mm but (although that also makes it light if you plan to carry it around). Because of ...


4

I'm not party to any engineering details and haven't yet used the lens so this is purely speculation, however... The Canon 100-400 (a first party competitor) was originally released in 1998, it's likely that since then manufacturing methods and designs have improved considerably allowing Tamron to produce a lens of good quality for a lower price. Obviously ...


4

Canon filed their patent on the EF mount in 1987, so it expired in 2007. Additionally, clean room reverse engineering to adapt to an interface is not protected by patent. Canikon could block sigma or related just with firmware updates They could, but this would also break compatibility with older Canon lenses. Many 3rd party lenses and adapters mimic an ...


4

Does this make the lens better than an L Lens? It all depends on what way you mean when you use the word "better": Sharper at common apertures and focal lengths? At the center of the frame or over the entire field of view? Less chromatic aberration at a particular focal length and aperture? Less light falloff at a particular focal length and aperture? ...


4

You are asking two questions: Is the Tamron 17-50mm f/2.8 a wide angle lens? Does a specific wide angle lens have a benefit over the Tamron 17-50mm f/2.8? I have two answers: The Tamron 17-50mm f/2.8 lens is a zoom lens and covers the range of a wide angle lens as well as a normal lens and depending on the definition you have, can also be considered a ...


4

Yes, assuming: The third party lens is an autofocus lens. The third party lens is compatible with the Canon EF mount. The third party lens is compatible with the 80D with regards to any type of autofocus. Older third party lenses sometimes have firmware issues that make them less than fully compatible with newer bodies. From the lens side of things, there'...


4

The only really answerable question in the format we have here is, "How do I compare similar lenses to decide which is best for me? Let's look at the three lenses in question: The Canon EF 70-200mm f/2.8 L USM was introduced in 1995 when 35mm film was still the standard and most of us never dreamed we'd be shooting digital cameras for anything other than ...


3

You haven't said which body you want to use it on. If its crop sensor, you really need to look at the EFS 17-55 F2.8. It adds image stabilization and a full stop more speed. It has good bokeh when wide open.


3

Well I would say that based on this link, performance at f/4 is similar for both as far as sharpness goes. Distortion can be compared at this link. I'm not sure what you mean by blur, if you are talking about bokeh, neither of these are going to be great. You really need a prime, and even for that a lens this wide isn't going to produce much out of focus. ...


3

The Canon model has image stabilization which can come quite in handy when handholding and not using a tripod. It also has a UD element which may improve the chromatic aberration on that lens. The Canon has 50mm longer reach, which is a benefit. The Tamron has full time manual focus which is nice to have. One thing to point out, is that the Tamron is not ...


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