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16

You appear to be using your lens (100-400/5-6.3) with the aperture wide open. I would expect the glow in your photos to be significantly reduced or absent stopped down to about F8. Many lenses "glow" when used wide open, especially in bright light with high contrast. It is likely associated with spherical aberration and is typically reduced or completely ...


12

The D7100 body that this lens works with has a focus motor built into the body that connects to a mechanical coupling on Nikkor AF lenses and third party equivalents to move the focus elements in the lens. Your D3300 does not have a focus motor in the body. To use autofocus your D3300 requires that you use Nikon AF-S or AF-I lenses or the equivalent third ...


11

The fact you're seeing this with two very different bodies suggests to me it's in the lens. Long zooms tend to have a bunch of elements (anywhere from a dozen to twenty, in my experience). No lens coating is perfect, and no lens surface is perfect. Every time light passes through an air-glass or glass-glass interface at an element surface, there's a small ...


10

The Tamron is known to be optically very good and sharp wide open across the frame. I know semi pro Nikon users who use that one on a crop camera for e.g. wedding shots. The F number on your kit number is only F3.5 on the widest and if you go into Av and keep an eye on it, you see it drops very quickly to F5-5.6. The range 2.8 - 4 is a stop (double the ...


8

A Tamron lens is my preferred option as I used to have one for my old Minolta when I used 35mm film. That's all well and good; I'm sure Tamron appreciates your brand loyalty. That being said, there are a plethora of good lenses made by Tamron, Canon, Sigma, etc., and a plethora of absolute garbage lenses. Do your homework on a specific lens - the brand ...


7

Is there a reason why Canon and Nikon allow third party makers to make lens that provide similar specs to first-party lens such are AF, IS and aperture control when they sell for less? Controlling a product line that has the support of many third parties is much more profitable than trying to build and sell every product yourself. Canon and Nikon don't just ...


6

Comparing two very similar lenses like the Sigma 18-50mm f/2.8 EX DC Macro and the Tamron 17-50mm f2.8 SP XR Di II LD VC Lens in terms of sharpness can be difficult. Often one lens will perform better at a particular focal length and aperture, while the other will perform better at other focal length and aperture combinations. Even at the same focal length ...


6

Neither of those lenses are really what most macro specialists would consider a macro lens. For a lens to be considered a true macro lens it should be able to project a life sized image of the subject onto the image sensor or film. If you're taking a picture of a 20mm long bug, a macro lens should be able to focus close enough to project an image of the bug ...


6

The Tamron SP 85mm f/1.8 Di VC was introduced in 2016. The Nikon 85mm f/1.8G was introduced in 2012. Most lenses settle into a lower street price a few months after their introduction than the price they command when first introduced. It's still very early to see where the long term price of the Tamron will settle. The most obvious difference is the ...


6

I seem have found the culprit, my single coated 67mm Hama UV filter. I put it on as some point between these two pictures and didn't think it could be the cause because I have never had issues with filters before with any lens. Here are before and after pictures with and without the filter, both at 400mm f/6.3 1/400 ISO250 on my 70D. And 100% crop ...


5

They're red LEDs under the cover. I removed the cover from my 430 EX and whilst it works better (with all lenses, on account of producing a brighter, sharper grid pattern) the light is still red. Here's what it looks like without the cover: It's worth noting that you can in theory remove and replace the cover as necessary but I snapped one off the clips ...


5

With an adapter (The Nikon FT1), yes. As a native lens, no. (There are no third party lenses for the Nikon 1 system yet.) Assuming you have the newer version of that lens with a built-in focus motor, it should autofocus and everything. It's my understanding that there is an older version of the same lens that relies on the camera body to have an AF motor; ...


5

TL/DR: You want to look for "for Canon" in the description; and stick with Di and Di II lenses and stay away from Di III. The easiest way to make sure a Sigma/Tamron/Tokina or other 3rd-party lens works with your 60D is to make sure they're in the Canon mount, and that they're new/current versions, or firmware upgradeable to be current. The one big issue ...


5

As you have found out, filters can cause issues. Every time light hits a reflective/transparent surface some light is refracted through the surface and some light is reflected off of the surface. The coatings on lenses and filters are meant to suppress those reflections. Single-coated is better than uncoated, and multi-coated is better than single. The light ...


4

When taking pictures babies have two annoying tendencies: They move a lot, and they run at the camera. Fast shutter speeds and the ability to change framing gives a preference for a f2.8 zoom. I don't know how fast the Tamron focuses, but if you are going to use it at f2.8, I sure hope it focuses fast. Children move a lot in unexpected directions. I really ...


4

Any of those lenses will be fairly comparable. They all have their positives and negatives... I have the Nikkor lens which I picked up as my first zoom in that range to use on film and it is what it is, it's built to a price and that shows. It's not the sharpest at 300mm but (although that also makes it light if you plan to carry it around). Because of ...


4

I'm not party to any engineering details and haven't yet used the lens so this is purely speculation, however... The Canon 100-400 (a first party competitor) was originally released in 1998, it's likely that since then manufacturing methods and designs have improved considerably allowing Tamron to produce a lens of good quality for a lower price. Obviously ...


4

Canon filed their patent on the EF mount in 1987, so it expired in 2007. Additionally, clean room reverse engineering to adapt to an interface is not protected by patent. Canikon could block sigma or related just with firmware updates They could, but this would also break compatibility with older Canon lenses. Many 3rd party lenses and adapters mimic an ...


4

Does this make the lens better than an L Lens? It all depends on what way you mean when you use the word "better": Sharper at common apertures and focal lengths? At the center of the frame or over the entire field of view? Less chromatic aberration at a particular focal length and aperture? Less light falloff at a particular focal length and ...


4

You are asking two questions: Is the Tamron 17-50mm f/2.8 a wide angle lens? Does a specific wide angle lens have a benefit over the Tamron 17-50mm f/2.8? I have two answers: The Tamron 17-50mm f/2.8 lens is a zoom lens and covers the range of a wide angle lens as well as a normal lens and depending on the definition you have, can also be considered a ...


4

Yes, assuming: The third party lens is an autofocus lens. The third party lens is compatible with the Canon EF mount. The third party lens is compatible with the 80D with regards to any type of autofocus. Older third party lenses sometimes have firmware issues that make them less than fully compatible with newer bodies. From the lens side of things, there'...


4

Well, shoot. It's stamped right on the zoom ring, in line with the focal length index, very tiny.


4

The only really answerable question in the format we have here is, "How do I compare similar lenses to decide which is best for me? Let's look at the three lenses in question: The Canon EF 70-200mm f/2.8 L USM was introduced in 1995 when 35mm film was still the standard and most of us never dreamed we'd be shooting digital cameras for anything other than ...


3

The short answer is yes, they are trustworthy but your question seems to be more orientated towards the 'should you go for the cheaper version' kind of area. In some cases, people would consider the Tamron/Sigma equivalent to be better, but that's subjective and can take into account many things such as build quality, features, price and of course picture ...


3

I have been able to try the Canon 2x III extender and Sigma 70-200/2.8OS combination and they do mount and autofocus on the Canon 70D and T5i. The resulting image quality, unfortunately, is beyond the scope of what I can test.


3

I have the Sigma 18-50 f2.8 (non-HSM, non-MACRO) Made in Japan and the Tamron 17-50 f2.8 (non-VC) Made in China, both copies are for Pentax K-mount. I would have to warn you about Tamron. The QC is very inconsistent and it really depends on whether you're lucky and get a sharp copy, or like me, who has a back-focusing copy with inconsistent edge distortion....


3

The Tamron 17-50mm f/2.8 XR Di II is probably a better fit for your Rebel T3i than the Tamron 28-75mm f/2.8 XR Di. With the 1.6x crop factor the equivalent field of view (FoV) is for a 27-80mm and 45-120mm lens respectively on a full frame body. The 17-50 is also a newer design that is optimized for cropped sensors. I own one and it is quite a sharp lens for ...


3

1-stop is twice, or half, the light depending on the direction of change. So from F/4 to F/2.8 you could shoot with a shutter speed that is twice as fast and get the same exposure. To achieve the same exposure with the same shutter speed you would have to adjust the ISO from, for example, 100 to 200. So, your real world calculation would be almost twice as ...


3

Most close-up lenses are basically toys, they tend to have really bad optics and as such produce low quality images. If you want to do cheap macro photography there are other better options: Extension tubes - those are tubes that move your lens away from the sensor, this let the lens focus closer and achieve higher magnification, extension tubes don't have ...


3

VR The Nikkon 18-200 has VR, the Tamron 18-200 does not. VR can give you an advantage worth two or three stops on the aperture. Nikon claim up to four stops There are some relatively cheap Nikon lenses that include VR. For example 18-55mm f/3.5-5.6G AF-S VR DX NIKKOR $197 55-200mm f/4-5.6G AF-S DX Nikkor VR - $247 18-200mm f/3.5-5.6G AF-S DX Nikkor ED VR ...


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