36

Short answer: you can obtain some very good results, but only under certain conditions and absolutely not even close to what is shown in the linked video clip. My company, Amped Software, develops image and video processing software for forensic and intelligence applications, so basically we are the real world counterpart of the CSI software. With ...


31

You are not required to purchase any lenses at all. It all depends on your photography needs and what you're willing to spend your money on. Regarding range, the superzoom 18-200 mm covers the same range as the other four lenses you mentioned. All of the other lenses focal ranges are parts of the large range of the 18-200 mm lens. The 18-200 can surely ...


19

Image quality. The wider the range of focal lengths on one lens, the more design compromises are made and the more correction must be applied deal with things like geometric distortion, chromatic aberration, and light fall off in the corners. Aperture. Even though the EF-S 18-200mm f/3.5-5.6 has the same maximum aperture of f/5.6 as the EF-S 55-250mm f/4-5.6 ...


15

The main reason we don't have "super zooms" with a large constant aperture is size/weight/costs. Roger at LensRentals recently blogged about this in the post: About That 25-300mm f/2.8 You Wanted About How Big is that? The lens is in a video housing, so that makes it a bit larger than an SLR designed lens of the same specifications would be. But it'...


14

Stop listening to him. You can compare anything you want. A DSLR and a superzoom? Sure. A DSLR and a cellphone? Yes. A camera and a fishing rod? Why not! You will see many people compare things which are quite different, even here on this site. Think about the questions when someone asks if they should get a new lens or a new camera. What they are doing is ...


14

I just try to see if there's any stable surface available nearby and try to use it That's the basic idea. Be careful to watch for slight slippage. Also note that vibrations can also affects the stability, including when you trigger the shot - make sure you use a timer so that the vibrations of your touching the camera can subside. I'd use the 10 seconds ...


13

Comparing feature-by-feature is meaningless, a DLSR (even entry level) and a superzoom point and shoot are systems that choose almost opposite tradeoffs at every important design decision. It's a bit like comparing a sports car and a mini van - while both are cars they are different systems designed for different purposes. If the words small, light or ...


13

A smaller zoom range means fewer compromises in the optical design and usually better quality. It's better to have a boat and a car and use them where appropriate than to have some sort of boatcar that doesn't do either job as well.


13

The 1200mm lens you cite is something of an aberration, since it's built-to-order, not a general-market lens — see Why are some big telephoto lenses so expensive compared to telescopes? and Why are some lenses so expensive?. But the general rule holds true: lenses for DSLRs and most mirrorless cameras are gigantic compared to those in superzoom cameras. ...


12

On a tight budget or when you can't use a tripod, bean bags are the way to go. Find a stable surface, place the bag and wiggle the camera around until you are happy with the framing. FYI ordinary shop bought bags of sunflower seeds or lentils or surprise surprise beans work pretty well as a bean bag. Sand is also pretty good but heavy. Stick your choice of ...


11

You can't make something out of nothing, you have to have (or guess) some information in order to be able to enhance an image in any way. For example if you know the properties of the blurring function (and there is no image noise) then you can actually unblur a photo. However you rarely know the blur function and noise is always present so that severely ...


10

You're comparing ultra-wide versus "simply-" wide. It's as if you'd compare a 200mm tele to a 600mm one. Those 8mm do in fact have a great significance, for example: http://www.flickr.com/photos/brynolf/754640788/ I do think this illustration is a tad exaggerated, but you get the feeling.


10

Atmospheric effects aren't caused by using a particular focal length. They are caused by how much air is between the camera and the subject, by the uniformity or lack of uniformity of the temperature and density of that air, the stillness or turbulence of the air, and the amount and types of particulates suspended in that air. We notice atmospheric effects ...


10

Assuming that the quoted 1365mm focal length is in 35mm full frame equivalent terms (because otherwise, it would be huge), then the actual focal length of the lens assembly is around 1365 / 5.6 ~= 244mm. To accomplish an equivalent 1365mm focal length with a 1.6 crop factor, you would need about an 854mm actual focal length lens. I'm not aware of anything ...


9

A (simplified) Look at Camera Sensors The sensor on your camera is 14 megapixels and 6.17x4.55 mm in size. By comparison, a Nikon D3100 (an entry-level DSLR) has a sensor that is also 14 megapixels, but its physical size is 23.1 x 15.4 mm. Even more expensive DSLRs, known as "Full frame," have a sensor that is roughly the size of 35mm film (about 36 x 24 ...


9

That is the price because that is how much enough customers are willing to pay for it. While they are complex lenses, they are not high quality ones (the Nikon is sharper with more distortions) and both are quite dim on the long end. The price is for convenience of changing lenses less often, or not all all. After all, comfort and convenience are very ...


9

I believe F1.4 is the best you can do on a compact so far: http://www.dpreview.com/news/2012/7/18/Panasonic-announces-Lumix-DMC-LX7-with-F1-4-2-3-24-90mm-lens You know from 35mm format lenses that it is hard to find those that are sharp wide open. it is hard to get all those rays of light to hit a single small dot. On a compact sensor, those dots are even ...


8

There is no difference. There is only one SX40 and its official name is Canon Powershot SX40 HS. HS stands for High-Speed because it uses a CMOS sensor so it is capable of shooting at 10 FPS. Other manufacturers do not use the same naming scheme but this is quite common lately. Almost all cameras which can shoot video at 1080p use CMOS sensors and are ...


8

It is more about ratios than addition/subtraction. 70-200mm is less than 3x from the shortest to longest focal length. That makes it possible to place all of the moving elements that enable the lens to change focal length in front of the aperture diaphragm. 18-135mm is 7.5x. Placing all of the zooming elements in such a lens in front of the diaphragm would ...


8

The biggest factor that I can think of is cost and complexity around the lens design. Lens focal lengths that are shorter than the distance from the lens mount to the sensor (flange-focal distance) need to be designed with what amounts to reverse telephoto (retrofocus) lens at the end in order to make up the distance and the complexity level of that gets ...


8

If inexpensive tripods are too expensive, I suggest making your own stable platform. The tripod socket on cameras is 1/4" × 20 thread-per-inch UNC, a.k.a. 1/4-20. (Do not try to use metric, such as M6-1. They are not compatible). Depending on your skills and creativity, you can make something that is entirely suited to how and where you tend to shoot. Maybe ...


7

This kind of question comes up very often with different combination of subjects and, no matter how often it is asked, the answer is still NO. If needed such a range in a single, you should have bought an ultra-zoom instead of a DSLR. One of the beauties of a DSLR is the ability to change lens, so I suggest you make friends with it. Birds are extremely ...


7

It is hard to make a zoom lens that is sharp and open enough the entire focal range without tunnel vision and lens distortion. So the larger the range span is the more difficult it is to keep the quality equal. That's why the fixed focal length lenses still exist. You can get amazing quality compared to your zoom lenses for a small price, at the cost of ...


7

Do some simple math: Assume the plane is 20000 feet away, and 200 feet long. Let's also assume you want to fill half the frame width (in a full-frame camera), which is 1/2 of 36 mm = 18 mm. With B/G*d = f (where B is the size in the picture, G the size of the object, and d its distance), you get: f = 18mm/200ft*20000ft = 1800 mm An easier to remember way (...


7

Here are the advantages of the 50X zoom compact camera: ZOOM Here are the advantages of a DSLR: Larger sensor = Better low light performance Larger sensor = Longer exposure times without unacceptable noise from the sensor heating up Larger sensor = more background blur when desired Interchangeable lenses = better lens quality at the only focal length you'...


7

This is probably because some cameras disable autofocus at slow apertures. The camera manufacturers think that performance won't be good enough, and so they disable it. The third-party lens is reporting inaccurate information to the camera so that it will work anyway — slow and sometimes incorrect, perhaps, but at least the camera will try. Exposure might ...


7

In photography, what is interesting is mostly the angle of view (AOV). The AOV is the angle that a lens offers on a sensor - it can be specified horizontally, diagonally, or vertically. AOV [°] = 2 * arctan ( sensor_height|width|diagonale [mm] / (2 * focal_length [mm]) ) The formula to get from a specified focal length (FL) on a non-full-frame sensor to ...


6

The larger the maximum aperture, the larger the lens. Therefore fitting an ultra-bright lens works against making the camera small. The size also increases in proportion to the focal-length, so the more zoom you fit in, the harder it becomes to make an ultra-bright lens can keep it compact. There are a number of F/1.8 lenses in compact cameras but you will ...


6

Two points: On "On the other hand, camcorders routinely have f0.95-f1.2 lenses", I simply dispute this finding. Take a skim at PL lenses available, there aren't any lens close to f1 that's economically reachable, which brings me to point 2. I refer to Erwin Puts, lens expert. In his Leica Lens Compendium, he mentioned many technical difficulties in ...


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