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100

Rockwell presents his opinion as fact even when it is actually a contested opinion. Yes, professionals use 24-70 lenses. They aren't for every situation, but there are plenty where they are great go to lenses. The Canon 24-70 f/2.8 II, for example, is one of the most popular zoom lenses ever. I do wedding photography and during the reception, the 24-70 ...


16

I am on the edge of investing in the Sony a6000 ... Ok, fallacy #1. :) You never invest in a camera unless you're a pro and can write it off on your taxes. Cameras depreciate. Even while new. Your "investment" will never give you any monetary returns. This is an expense, pure and simple. (If anybody has other suggestions in that price range - I am ...


12

Addendum: After seeing the example photos that were not available when this answer was originally written, there are a few qualifications that should be made regarding the original answer that appears below the line following the newer answer immediately below this explanation. It contains accurate information with regard to how the AF system of the 7D and ...


12

Sports photography usually require two things: a long focal length and a wide aperture. The long lens is required to shoot action a long way away. The wide aperture is used for two purposes: Letting in enough light (it won't always be bright sunshine; weather, being indoors and daylight will affect the amount of natural light available to you) so you can ...


12

Selecting an appropriate aperture When shooting sports in low light you're not going to be able to shoot at f/11. Most of us use f/2.8 lenses and shoot wide open. We do this not only because it helps isolate our subject(s) from backgrounds that are often cluttered but also because we need the "speed" of the wide aperture to allow a fast enough shutter speed....


12

There's a reason no one makes a 24-200mm FF lens. Several, in fact. The main one is that not many photographers who know what they are doing would ever consider buying such a lens for a 20MP FF camera such as your EOS 6D. To get anywhere approaching a constant, usable aperture the lens would be very heavy and large. Such a lens would be very expensive to ...


10

Annie Leibovitz used a Canon 24-70 2.8L for her photoshoot of the Queen Elizabeth of England. So the statement that professionals don't use that lens isn't true. I have shot professionally for 6 years and my 2 go to lenses are the Canon 24-70 2.8L and Canon 70-200 2.8L IS depending on the circumstances.


9

Which professionals? Different photographers obviously have different needs. As a rule, be suspect of any statement that treats the needs of such a large class of people the same. The Canon EF 24-70 f/4L is a very popular lens, but at $1000, it's not exactly targeted at consumers.


7

Two of the lenses I would consider would be either the EF-S 15-85mm f/3.5-5.6 IS or the EF 24-105mm f/4L IS. The 15-85 is lighter and covers a wide range of focal lengths. The 24-105 is built like a tank and covers a range of longer focal lengths. If you intend on taking mostly long range pictures, the EF 70-200mm f/4L IS is the way to go, but it is a ...


7

The 200-400 gives you a lot more flexibility. But it might not be short enough depending on what you want to do and how far away you're going to be. When shooting airshows I usually use a 70-200 f/2.8 with 2x teleconverter, and a second camera with a 28-70 f/2.8. For takeoff/landing shots, depending on aircraft and location, even 140mm can be too long (...


7

Here's a little context for comparing the various versions of the Canon 70-200mm "L" lens series: EF 70-200mm f/2.8L was introduced in March 1995. This design is almost 25 years old! EF 70-200mm f/4L was introduced in September 1999. The design is almost 20 years old. EF 70-200mm f/2.8L IS was introduced in September 2001, over 17 years ago. EF 70-200mm f/...


7

If the issues with your current setup are low constrast and looking washed out, then a new lens isn't going to help. A polarizer will help in some cases when there is some blue sky in the picture or a rainbow, but otherwise it won't make much difference either. What will matter is post processing. Clouds are all quite bright, even the "dark" ones. The ...


7

@mattdm nailed it: I've been shooting long guns for a decade. The single most important factor is light. For a catalog-quality shot you need lots of good diffuse light, which you can get by bouncing a speedlight off a white ceiling or wall, or by shooting in daylight with reflectors. For black guns you need to go between +1 and +2 EV to bring out detail. ...


6

Get both. You will definitely need the 18-55mm lens for shooting indoors and general all around photography as it covers wide-angle to short telephoto. The 55-250mm is a great lens for wildlife or sporting events, but it is much too long for shooting indoors.


6

Most professional setups start with a 24-70/2.8 and 70-200/2.8 two-lens combo on full frame and work outwards from there. These are the two general-purpose bread'and'butter lenses for a lot of pros simply because they're versatile being both fast (f/2.8) and zooms in the most common focal length ranges. Whether or not they'll be ideal for you, however, is ...


6

Question asks for opinions, but the answer can be subjective and still be on spot. The first thing to consider when taking photos is your skill, not the camera. And unless it comes to professionals or experts, the kit lens is the first thing that 90% of users will come in contact with (and often the only one); do you really think that Sony couples its ...


6

35mm is not wide enough for many types of general photography. With any group shots, (especially indoors) or any large outdor landscape scenes, you will need something like 16mm to 18mm to get everything in the frame. The easiest way to accomplish this is by going with the 18-55mm kit lens. I don't know what you read but todays kit lenses are much better ...


6

Yes. There is no reason I'm aware of that makes the 85mm f/1.4D a bad choice for a D750. According to reviews, it is a very good lens, both in terms of optical quality and mechanical stability, as is mentioned for example here. (In fact, the author of this blog specifically mentions that the lens works well on the D800). Autofocus and electronics of the ...


6

The most obvious thing is that you chose to use f/11 for your photos. At least according to the EXIF data on this image, your lens had a maximum aperture value of f/5.1 at this focal length. By using that kind of aperture, you get two stops worth of exposure and therefore you could drop your ISO by two stops. You say in a comment that you wanted more depth ...


6

The two main choices you'll find from Canon are that you can get an 18-55mm f/3.5-5.6 with either the newer "STM" (stepper motor) design, or the non-STM version "II" design (which uses micro-motors). The STM motors are significantly quieter ... but they are also faster to focus. So even if you aren't interested in the "quiet" feature (great for video ...


5

The 75-300 III is an older lens with a design that goes back to the '80s. It typically comes in a variety of flavors (with and without USM, with and without IS), but the cheapie one you can find new these days typically sports neither USM nor IS. And the optics are relatively old. That's not to say it's a bad lens, but it's more limited than nearly any ...


5

I personally think a flash with bounce and more power offers a lot more flexibility than an additional lens. In many situations you can make up for lack of reach by just moving your body, or fast glass by doing long exposures, but there are just a lot of scenes you can't shoot at all without a diffuse light source (e.g. when fill flash is needed, or an ...


5

The EF-S 17-55 f/2.8 isn't an "L" lens -- that's absolutely true. Before dismissing it, though, I think it's important to remember that Canon won't label any EF-S lens an "L" since it wouldn't work on their pro bodies. The performance of the lens, though, is considered to be excellent -- definitely competitive with "L" offerings, and very possibly even ...


5

I'm going to step around the discussion of the 17-55 EF-S lens and its comparison to an L lens as thats a loaded question that has lots of heated debate surrounding it. To address the meat of your question which I take as 'I want to upgrade to an L lens, which one?' that depends on what you're looking for in a lens. Unfortunately there isn't a single L ...


5

here's some hints from someone who's been photographing orchestral performance for 12 years. Know the music beforehand. Don't let the pauses, or quiet moments take you by surprise. Tripod well get in the way. Maybe a monopod. Don't shoot below 125th/sec. NEVER use flash. It will momentarily blind musicians who are reading music. Always wear stage black. ...


5

Taken the crop factor into account, a good and also cheap "normal" lens is the Nikon AF-S DX Nikkor 35mm f/1.8G


5

@AJ said all that I would have said and more about kenrockwell.com; but I would like to expand more on your specific requirement (and on AJ's recommendation) as this is also the kind of photography that I do the most. For your situation of shooting mostly buildings where you can set the shot up, you are probably best served by following his advice ...


5

What lens would work for a canon 6D to take up close photos of birds far away in the trees? It comes down to three questions: How up close do you want to get? How far away are the trees? How big are the birds? In landscape orientation, your 400mm lens takes in 3.4 degrees over the height of the sensor and 5.2 degrees across the width. That means that a ...


5

None of these lenses are going to approach L series lenses in terms of build quality and the ability to take punishment and just keep working as they should. There are reasons they offer near the same optical quality at 1/5 to 1/15 the price of an "L" prime lens. I've had an EF 50mm f/1.8 II "nifty fifty" since 1997 or so and it still works fine for what it ...


5

Don't be fooled by what others say about the kit lens. Sony has a reputation to live up too. The kit lens specifications has been chosen to provide a good entry level lens. Your best choice is to start with the kit lens and then build your inventory of lenses after you learn how to use your new camera.


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