77

Technique is typically at fault with "fuzzy" images 99% of the time with someone new to interchangeable lens cameras (ILC) with only a low-cost kit lens. The lens is not the problem. Low end kit lenses are limited, and they are cheap, and there are much nicer lenses around, but how you use one is more likely to be the fault than what glass is in the lens. ...


20

In general, yes, since 55mm focal length is 55mm focal length. In particular, no, since no two lens designs are exactly the same. Can you tell me what difference will I get? It depends on the specific designs of the two lenses in question. What are their maximum apertures? How many aperture blades? How much light fall-off is there between the center and ...


16

I am on the edge of investing in the Sony a6000 ... Ok, fallacy #1. :) You never invest in a camera unless you're a pro and can write it off on your taxes. Cameras depreciate. Even while new. Your "investment" will never give you any monetary returns. This is an expense, pure and simple. (If anybody has other suggestions in that price range - I am ...


13

They will be very similar, as the focal length are the same. However because of lens design the image quality might be massively different, as distortion, chromatic aberration and the available maximum aperture might mean you get better results using one lens over the other. Generally for cheaper kit lenses it is usual that they do not have a constant ...


12

I was told it’s not good to use auto ISO If unqualified, whoever told you that is a fool. Auto ISO is a tool, and as with any other tool it can be used well and it can be used badly. Instead try to learn when auto ISO will do as well (or better) than setting it manually, and when you need to override the camera's decision.


11

It’s getting me the shot even though there is some noise This is the point. If your priority is getting the shot, why not. But if your priority is getting a printable photo (which is what many people are after) then you have to make sure that you won't be using an ISO setting that makes your camera produce more noise that you can post-process (given your ...


9

I guess that the kit lens is a 18-55 mm f/3,5-5,6 and together with a D90 there is no reason to buy a full-frame camera. It wont solve any of your problems and you'll be able to take this photo with the gear you have without any problems at all. Firstly, you would want to stay away from shooting at f/22. It will not give you sharp images nor the light that ...


9

It's mostly because the standard zoom kit lens for film cameras would start at 28mm. This is the widest you can typically go before hitting the more expensive exotic glass. The APS-C field-of-view equivalent for what 28mm on full frame looks like is 18mm. So that's what most kit lenses for APS-C sensor cameras use. You'll note further down that list that ...


6

With the exception of the alley photo, which is either a focusing error, motion blur, or there was a lot of condensation on your lens (had you just moved from a cool dry place to hot, humid area?), most of the photos on your flickr stream are reasonably sharp and about what I would expect for the T3i with that lens. The photo of the person in the sunglasses ...


6

For a beginner photographer, a typical kit lens will provide a versatile range of focal lengths in a relatively compact and affordable lens. The raw optical quality of most kit lenses is not spectacular, but for a beginner to photography, the raw optical quality of the lens is unlikely to be to the limiting factor in the quality of images produced. The kit ...


6

The aperture changes because of focal length not focus. Your lens has a widest aperture of f/3.5 at 18mm but to due physical properties of lens design, the widest aperture becomes f/5.6 at 105mm. Because the lens aperture was at f/4.5 it means you were at a focal length of about 35mm when you took the photo. It is possible to buy lenses that have a ...


6

Question asks for opinions, but the answer can be subjective and still be on spot. The first thing to consider when taking photos is your skill, not the camera. And unless it comes to professionals or experts, the kit lens is the first thing that 90% of users will come in contact with (and often the only one); do you really think that Sony couples its ...


6

Although your composition will likely be the same, there may be differences in falloff (vignetting), barrel distortion and chromatic aberration. You may also reach limits of the lenses' apertures. In both cases, you're operating the zoom at an extreme, and you can't expect the results to be as good as, say, a 24-105 at 55m, and certainly not as good as a ...


6

Using the smallest aperture is not optimal for sharpness, as that causes Diffraction. Go with f/8 or f/11 for best results (it depends on the lens, and some Pentax cameras have a special "MTF" setting in the P mode for that, to always prefer the best aperture. It could be that your "phase detection" focus measuring system is maladjusted. Therefore, try to ...


5

You may need a different lens if the kit doesn't fit the subject matter you're most interested in shooting, but given that you're relying on Auto mode even after a year, perhaps it's more a matter of knowledge/practice [see WTD174], or possibly just that photography is not for you. There's no shame in this. The vast majority of people don't use cameras to ...


5

What you are seeing is called motion blur. Simply stated, it is blur caused by motion during exposure. Horses obviously move and their legs will show even more motion. The solution to this is to use a faster shutter-speed. You can control the shutter-speed in Shutter-Priority mode or in Manual mode. For the former you will get a metered exposure which will ...


5

Don't be fooled by what others say about the kit lens. Sony has a reputation to live up too. The kit lens specifications has been chosen to provide a good entry level lens. Your best choice is to start with the kit lens and then build your inventory of lenses after you learn how to use your new camera.


5

My gut says to me that this is one of those questions where if you have to ask, it isn't a gear problem. When you need a wider and lens you will start to feel it. For example this shot It was a tight space, with a Nikon D7100 and a 18-55mm lens, shot at 18mm. There are certainly technical problems with the image, but I would have loved to have been able to ...


5

So I need to decide between body + kit lense or body + 70-200 f2.8. which is the best choice ? Of the two, the EF 24-105 f/4L is the better choice, considering that you say you're interested in wedding photography. Presumably, that means that you'll be taking photos of people at close and medium distances, and a 70-200mm lens is just too long for that kind ...


4

Type the name of your lens in a Google or Flickr searchbox to see what others can do with it. Then pick a picture you like and try to recreate it. Learn what you need to know about settings along the way. You can use this site for the specific problems you encounter.


4

Here's the basic sequence of Canon's 18-55mm kit lenses from the list at the Canon Camera Museum. 2004/09 EF-S 18-55mm f/3.5-5.6 2004/09 EF-S 18-55mm f/3.5-5.6 USM Optics the same, but with micro-USM focus motor (Sold only in a few initial kits with the 300D). 2005/03 EF-S 18-55mm f/3.5-5.6 II Optically identical to the original. Cosmetic differences ...


4

Depends on your definition of "upgrade". To me, there are three paths you can take when you're starting out on purchasing your first lenses. But there is a "chicken-and-the-egg" problem, here. To know what lens you want, you have to have experience with a variety of lenses. Shotgun coverage with "training wheels" lenses The 18-55/55-250 IS "twin kit" ...


4

Are you using single capture focusing mode? (S)? (This is usually a physical switch on the camera, switching between S/C/A, in the case of the D5000 specifically it's an item on the Info screen). If you are using continuous focusing or auto, the camera will allow you to take a shot even if you do not have focus confirmation. Also, if your VR is faulty, it ...


4

Most of them seem ok. Pixel peeping is always going to end up revealing that some pixels aren't perfectly sharp, even on professional level cameras with professional optics. The only real focus issues I see is that the focus point on the flag shot was the sky rather than the flag, so the flag is out of focus, but the sky is well focused. On the shot with ...


4

It appears your test chart and camera may not be properly aligned with each other. Until that is corrected your results will not be valid. If, as appears to be the case, the left side of the chart is farther from the camera than the right side, then it is possible that the portion of the chart displaying -10mm is the same distance from the camera as the ...


4

Yes, of course you can take pictures with them. Will the pictures be as good as a professional would get more expensive lenses? No - but then a beginner won't get as good photos even if they're given the best lenses in the world. If you don't know what settings to use, your best bet is almost certainly to use either full auto or program mode and let the ...


4

It’s very subjective, if the kit lens is good or not. Most people can't tell the difference between a photos taken with a high quality lens and a fair one, only the really bad lenses stands out for the non photographer. Also using primes vs. zooms is very much based on price/quality vs flexibility. Some will choose primes based on low price, very high ...


4

The X-T20 is just a camera body and doesn't necessarily come with a lens at all. What you're probably thinking of is that interchangable lens cameras are often sold in a package with a "kit lens", but you would need to check the details of the package rather than just the camera.


4

It obviously depends on the lenses being compared. Looking at this comparison of the EF-S 18-135mm f/3.5-5.6 IS STM and the EF 50mm f/1.8 STM, both at f/5.6 for example, the prime is sharper, even in the center of the image. In this comparison with the EF-S 35mm f/2.8 Macro IS STM, both at f/8.0, I see more purple fringing, less sharpness and more ...


4

Exact same lens. Generally, the bundled price is lower than buying separately. Reasons to buy the camera body only include: You already have a lens collection and don't need that one. You're planning to buy different lenses (maybe higher quality, maybe just a different type, like primes instead of the big-range zoom)


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