74

Technique is typically at fault with "fuzzy" images 99% of the time with someone new to interchangeable lens cameras (ILC) with only a low-cost kit lens. The lens is not the problem. Low end kit lenses are limited, and they are cheap, and there are much nicer lenses around, but how you use one is more likely to be the fault than what glass is in the lens. ...


20

There are so many variables here, it would be impossible to give you a precise answer. It depends entirely what you are wanting to do... The kit lens can, in many cases, give a satisfactory photograph, however there are two main areas in which the kit lens suffers in competition against a pro lens: Aperture. Kit lenses are slow. They are usually about ...


20

In general, yes, since 55mm focal length is 55mm focal length. In particular, no, since no two lens designs are exactly the same. Can you tell me what difference will I get? It depends on the specific designs of the two lenses in question. What are their maximum apertures? How many aperture blades? How much light fall-off is there between the center and ...


16

I believe this is for the simple reason that many people buying "pro" bodies will have been DSLR/SLR customers previously and will thus have an existing lens collection so are unlikely to need as many different options in terms of bundled lenses. The digital rebel end of the market is still capturing new DSLR customers who are upgrading from non-...


16

I am on the edge of investing in the Sony a6000 ... Ok, fallacy #1. :) You never invest in a camera unless you're a pro and can write it off on your taxes. Cameras depreciate. Even while new. Your "investment" will never give you any monetary returns. This is an expense, pure and simple. (If anybody has other suggestions in that price range - I am ...


15

Background blur, as an intrinsic element of a lens, is related to the physical diameter of the aperture as observed through the front of the lens. This is often called the "physical aperture", however it is more appropriately termed the entrance pupil. The size of the entrance pupil is really what determines how blurry OOF content will be, as it is the ...


15

No, the lens does not zoom automatically. Almost all SLR zoom lenses are zoomed using the zoom ring, very few have a motorized zoom mechanism.


13

They will be very similar, as the focal length are the same. However because of lens design the image quality might be massively different, as distortion, chromatic aberration and the available maximum aperture might mean you get better results using one lens over the other. Generally for cheaper kit lenses it is usual that they do not have a constant ...


12

Why are lenses included in kits so bad? Kit lenses aren't bad -- they're just optimized for different parameters. A kit lens is meant to be a decent general purpose lens that'll get you started with your camera and at the same time keep the price of the total package down to a point where you'll still buy it. If you compare the EF-S 18-135 IS to lenses that ...


10

The Tamron is known to be optically very good and sharp wide open across the frame. I know semi pro Nikon users who use that one on a crop camera for e.g. wedding shots. The F number on your kit number is only F3.5 on the widest and if you go into Av and keep an eye on it, you see it drops very quickly to F5-5.6. The range 2.8 - 4 is a stop (double the ...


9

Small sensors can be better for macro images, the standard definition of macro means a 1:1 size ratio between subject and film, so you could project an image of a 35mm object onto a single piece of 35mm film. Because compacts (usually) have smaller sensors a true 1:1 macro lens on a compact would be capable of filling the frame with smaller objects. A DSLR ...


9

DSLRs are designed to allow you to change the lens. They are offered as "body-only" for people that already have compatible lenses, or know exactly what they want. Most folks who are new to DSLR want to buy a complete camera, body and lens. So all the manufacturers offer a combination of the body with a cheap lens. This is the "kit lens" For entry level ...


9

I guess that the kit lens is a 18-55 mm f/3,5-5,6 and together with a D90 there is no reason to buy a full-frame camera. It wont solve any of your problems and you'll be able to take this photo with the gear you have without any problems at all. Firstly, you would want to stay away from shooting at f/22. It will not give you sharp images nor the light that ...


9

It's mostly because the standard zoom kit lens for film cameras would start at 28mm. This is the widest you can typically go before hitting the more expensive exotic glass. The APS-C field-of-view equivalent for what 28mm on full frame looks like is 18mm. So that's what most kit lenses for APS-C sensor cameras use. You'll note further down that list that ...


8

A kit lens is a lens included with a camera. The Wikipedia article for kit lens begins with: generally an inexpensive lens priced at the lowest end of the manufacturer's range so as to not add much to a camera kit's price. The tag wiki excerpt for kit-lens: A "kit" lens is a lens included with a camera body at time of purchase.


8

One factor is the lens' maximum resolution. The less sharp a lens is at its peak resolution, the easier I think it is to label it parfocal. If a lens is razor sharp when focused properly, even a little movement one way or the other will be quite noticeable. Not quite so much if the lens is a little soft to begin with. Another factor that may make it easier ...


8

Using the dpReview lens widget it appears the AF-S DX Nikkor 18-55mm f/3.5-5.6G VR is sharpest at f/8 for most focal lengths. There are some points in the zoom range that center sharpness is better at f/5.6 but usually at a much greater expense to edge sharpness. At DxO Mark, the results for the AF-S DX Nikkor 18-55mm f/3.5-5.6G VR are similar to those at ...


8

It is mainly about the cost/benefit ratio of making cheap lenses. It doesn't cost a lot more to make a lens f/3.5 than f/8 at an 18mm focal length since the entrance pupil (sometimes referred to as the effective or apparent aperture) is still well within the diameter of the mounting flange used by most interchangeable lens camera systems. As the lens is ...


7

To maximize background blur with a kit lens (Canon EF-S 18-55mm f/3.5 for example), you will need to zoom in as much as possible and use the widest aperture possible at that zoom. This will increase the physical size of the discs that are projected on to the sensor, but will not increase the size of them relative to other things in the scene. This is because ...


7

The focal length values on a lens give you a better indication of how it magnifies you view than the "x times optical zoom" attribute. So instead of saying the kit lens is a 3x zoom, it is described as a 18-55 zoom. This is to distinguish it from a 70-210 lens, which is also a 3x zoom but would give you a more magnified view, better at photographing far away ...


7

Given this is your first time with a DSLR, and given what you want to do, these 2 lenses will be plenty enough. Now, when you will have experience with this setup, you may feel limited by your lenses, but this will greatly depend on how you will use them and what you want to do. So wait for when you will feel limited, this time will come and you'll know ...


7

The first and third photos exhibit barrel distortion which is normally to be expected at 18mm when using an 18-55mm zoom lens. Software correction can help, but for best results you need software that includes a custom profile of that particular lens on that particular camera. There are also some perspective issues in shots #1 and 3, which are related to the ...


6

You can certainly improve an image significantly with post processing, however sharpening can introduce artifacts (halos) that would not be present in a truly sharp image so the result will never quite be as nice. There are many other attributes of a high quality lens that are difficult to make up for, corner sharpness (when lenses get really sift in the ...


6

If I am able to take a relatively sharp picture with a kit lens, and boost the vibrance and or saturation during post processing, will that picture be comparable to ones taken from an expensive "professional" lens? No. not consistently. You would have been surprised if somebody suggested otherwise :-) You can get some results that are similar some of the ...


6

Note: This answer was originally written for a different question that was later merged with this one. For only $50 difference getting the EF 18-55mm f/3.5-5.6 IS II with your T3i is a no-brainer. If you don't need it, you can sell it for a quick profit. The going rate for that lens used is about $80-100. But if you are, as you say, new to the scene you ...


6

Using prime lenses indirectly make you think a lot more about composition. This is fantastic to learn and find a style, yet comes with challenges. My favorite setup is a 50mm f1.4 and a 5D (which would have a comparable FOV to the 35mm on the D5100) Using only primes for event photography. I will never forget one of my first paid events. I tend to have a ...


6

The 18-55mm lens in the first (cheapest) kit is a "standard zoom", an equivalent to the classic 28-80mm zoom for film SLRs. It's versatile range being wide enough at 18mm for most landscape and interior shots, and long enough at 55mm to shoot tight portraits (head and shoulders) whilst being a comfortable distance from your subject (which also avoids any ...


6

Well, some actually do: Canon EOS 5D Mark III 22.3 MP Full Frame CMOS Digital SLR Camera with EF 24-105mm f/4 L IS USM Lens For example. But, I think the primary reason is that people who buy pro cameras probably have specific needs and desires and predicting that they'll all want "this lens" is certainly wrong. Not only that, most people that buy pro ...


6

For a beginner photographer, a typical kit lens will provide a versatile range of focal lengths in a relatively compact and affordable lens. The raw optical quality of most kit lenses is not spectacular, but for a beginner to photography, the raw optical quality of the lens is unlikely to be to the limiting factor in the quality of images produced. The kit ...


6

The aperture changes because of focal length not focus. Your lens has a widest aperture of f/3.5 at 18mm but to due physical properties of lens design, the widest aperture becomes f/5.6 at 105mm. Because the lens aperture was at f/4.5 it means you were at a focal length of about 35mm when you took the photo. It is possible to buy lenses that have a ...


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