36

In lens stabilisation contains a servo activated rear element which acts to move the image projected by the lens in order to cancel out the camera shake. In body stabilisation moves the sensor in order to counter camera shake. No method is clearly better, and discussion tends to turn into a brand war as Canon and Nikon don't offer (and are not likely to ...


30

As of today there are 38 prime lenses with image stabilization. Almost half (16) of them are from Canon and 2 are Canon-mount Sigma (data from these search results at NeoCamera). What you will notice is this is less common in the wide focal-length, with the only wide-angle stabilized lenses being Canon's 24mm, 28mm and 35mm, (all others below 100mm are ...


23

Looks like it's related to image stabilization as Tetsujin suggested. Managed to replicate the issue. Switched off the IS and the Ghosting went away. It is a new IS lens (Latest Sigma 105mm macro IS). Guess I just need to remember to switch it off in these circumstances. For those who are interested, here is the final shot


22

Sigma's product manual says: Please do not use Optical Stabilization in the following situations. When the lens is mounted on a tripod Bulb (long time exposure) As I understand it, the problem is as follows. Stabilization works by having some lens elements move around to correct for the the movement of the whole assembly. As Isaac Newton ...


20

What makes it stop working after a while? Educated guess: Error. An image stabilization system is like navigation by dead reckoning, in which you figure out where you are based on what you know about where you were, your speed, and changes in direction. If you're in a car traveling at 60mph for 5 minutes, you know you're going to be about 5 miles from ...


17

Prime lenses with image stabilization do exist, and I believe they will become more popular with time. One great example of the implementation is the Canon EF 100mm f/2.8L IS USM. It provides 4 stop hybrid image stabilization, great for angular as well as shift movement. A 50mm prime will not benefit nearly as much as a 50mm, especially when you start ...


17

If you're shooting with a tripod ­— a good, solid one, not a sub-$100 deal — image stabilization isn't very important. If you're shooting in a controlled environment with strobes, it's not very important either. Or, if you're shooting in very bright light where you can get good depth of field and a fast shutter speed (to today's standards of pickiness, much ...


15

The rule of thumb is you can hand hold a 50mm lens at 1/50th second, or a 100mm at 1/100th second and have reasonable lack of camera shake. VR extends that a few stops. So it depends on the amount of light. In bright sunlight, at f/16 and a 35mm lens, you wouldn't need a tripod or VR. In low light, VR won't be enough, you'll need a tripod In between ...


14

It is indeed a rule that comes from film cameras. On point 4 the answer is simple: Multiply the focal length with the crop factor of your sensor. Because the sensor is smaller than a full frame sensor, it will not cover the full image circle, cropping out a smaller image. This has the effect of looking like a longer focal length. E.g. on Canon, a 50mm ...


14

Strictly speaking, image stabilization (IS) is not a necessary feature for any lens. For the vast majority of the history of photography IS as we refer to it did not exist. Plenty of remarkable photos were taken in spite of the lack of IS. The ultimate method for camera/lens stabilization will always be a stable tripod with a quality head attached and a way ...


14

I suspect that one main problem is accumulated error. No measurement is perfect. There's always an error. The image stabilisation has to measure the relative movement of the camera and counteract it. During the exposure, many measurements occur. Each one builds on the result of the previous one. This means that the error also builds up. At some point the ...


14

There's only one way I could image IBIS to work without resolution reduction: if the sensor area was significantly bigger than the area exposed to light, so that there's still sensor available when it currently moves out of its initial position. It's actually exactly the opposite. The image circle — the result of that cone of light hitting the imaging ...


13

Image Stabilizations only compensates for camera movements. IS has no effect on subject movements. None. Zero. Nada. If your subject is moving, only a shorter exposure time ("faster shutter speed") will reduce the amount of blur caused by the subject's movement. Some related questions here at Photography SE for further reading: What is more important, f-...


12

Well if you're just talking about motion blur from your handheld shakiness - pretty much all the modern IS/VR/OS designs handle 1-stop differences pretty well. 1/30th at 105mm might be pushing it, but most current IS designs handle a two stop difference well, especially if you're a somewhat steady person. At the claims of 3-4 stops is really where things ...


12

In addition to MikeW's answer, I would suggest a few other benefits that tripods provide for landscape photography. Often with landscape photography there is the desire to compose an image exactly and then wait for the light to be "right". With a tripod it's possible to set up in advance, and then wait for the sun to rise or set or for that shaft of light ...


12

I did some quick Google Books searches, and while I can't pinpoint the origin, there are a number of references to it as a rule of thumb or general guideline in the early 1970s, and none that I can find before that. There are plenty of earlier references to the idea that a longer focal length requires a faster shutter but they're all general advice. The ...


12

No. Tripod sensing is based on vibration measurements. While it might seem logical that a camera could sense if something is attached to the tripod socket, they do not do that. The reason you state is enough since quick release plates often stay attached. Other accessories attach to the tripod socket such as flash brackets, camera slings, etc and would ...


11

No Canon dSLR has built in image stabilization. Canon offers it in select lenses, known as 'IS' lenses. So, no, neither offer image stabilization. All Canon cameras also offer noise reduction, and of course, it can be applied (or not in the case of RAW) on the computer after the fact as well. Does it matter? Noise reduction matters, because all cameras ...


11

I have found these lens Nikon AF 70-300mm f/4-5.6G in a very good price. I am planning to use them mainly to take pictures of the moon. I am aware that this lens does not have image stabilisation. Is this a major drawback ? If you plan on shooting a full moon on a clear night, handheld, it shouldn't be, because you can easily get shutter speeds faster than ...


11

You are correct that if the motion were cyclical and never exceeded the limits of the stabilization systems maximum travel then it should be able to last indefinitely. But if motion is in the same direction along an axis eventually the system reaches the limit of its travel. The main limit is with regard to the extent of the range of motion that can be ...


10

Reverting to some empirical data, the 70-200 f/2.8L II lens has a supposed 4 stops of IS at all focal length. DPreview tested it at 70mm and at 200mm and revealed it had just under 4 stops and 70mm and over 4 stops at 200mm! http://www.dpreview.com/lensreviews/canon_70-200_2p8_is_usm_ii_c16/page5.asp From the review: We're used to seeing Canon's latest ...


10

All tripods are not equal. Even with follow focus types of levers, you still need a more substantial tripod to shoot video when operating the camera with physical inputs than you need to shoot stills using a wired or wireless remote. The legs themselves need to be heavier to resist vibrations. Forget any tripod that requires raising a center column to get ...


9

I can back up rfusca's advice with a practical example. I went through a similar dilemma, looking for a short telephoto to shoot people at events where flash is not an option. My choice was between the newly released Canon 100 f/2.8L macro with a four stop stabiliser and the 'king of low light' Canon 85 f/1.2L. The 100 offers four stops of stabilization. ...


9

In the DSLR world, different brands handle this differently. Nikon, Canon and Panasonic camera bodies do not have any stabilization, rather some of their compatible lenses do implement image stabilization (the hardware is in the lens.) Other brands, like Sony, Olympus, and Pentax, implement vibration reduction in the camera body, so that any lens used is ...


9

The common explanation is that the VR circuitry in the camera has a tendency to 'dither' when it doesn't have any vibration error to correct and so introduce its own errors. As D. Lambert says, some cameras have a tripod detect mode and can shut down VR or compensate when it senses that you're using a tripod. Some high end telephoto lenses have a VR tripod ...


9

Hugin has a tutorial on their website, which made for a good starting point. Tools needed: Hugin ImageMagick Bash shell Create a Hugin project Start Hugin and be sure to select Interface > Advanced (Expert will do, too). Go to the Panorama Stitcher window. Set the Field of View (50° worked well for my smartphone camera), lens parameters and projection ...


9

The multi-exposure suggestion of @junkyardsparkle is best for a sudden transition, but for a smooth one, add a handle to the ring so that you can apply only tangential force. For example, apply a hose-clamp with a bit of cardboard or wire, bent at a right angle, to the ring and tighten very gently. Then just apply slow and gentle pressure to the end of the "...


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