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23

Looks like it's related to image stabilization as Tetsujin suggested. Managed to replicate the issue. Switched off the IS and the Ghosting went away. It is a new IS lens (Latest Sigma 105mm macro IS). Guess I just need to remember to switch it off in these circumstances. For those who are interested, here is the final shot


22

Sigma's product manual says: Please do not use Optical Stabilization in the following situations. When the lens is mounted on a tripod Bulb (long time exposure) As I understand it, the problem is as follows. Stabilization works by having some lens elements move around to correct for the the movement of the whole assembly. As Isaac Newton ...


21

What makes it stop working after a while? Educated guess: Error. An image stabilization system is like navigation by dead reckoning, in which you figure out where you are based on what you know about where you were, your speed, and changes in direction. If you're in a car traveling at 60mph for 5 minutes, you know you're going to be about 5 miles from ...


17

If you're shooting with a tripod ­— a good, solid one, not a sub-$100 deal — image stabilization isn't very important. If you're shooting in a controlled environment with strobes, it's not very important either. Or, if you're shooting in very bright light where you can get good depth of field and a fast shutter speed (to today's standards of pickiness, much ...


15

I suspect that one main problem is accumulated error. No measurement is perfect. There's always an error. The image stabilisation has to measure the relative movement of the camera and counteract it. During the exposure, many measurements occur. Each one builds on the result of the previous one. This means that the error also builds up. At some point the ...


15

There's only one way I could image IBIS to work without resolution reduction: if the sensor area was significantly bigger than the area exposed to light, so that there's still sensor available when it currently moves out of its initial position. It's actually exactly the opposite. The image circle — the result of that cone of light hitting the imaging ...


14

Strictly speaking, image stabilization (IS) is not a necessary feature for any lens. For the vast majority of the history of photography IS as we refer to it did not exist. Plenty of remarkable photos were taken in spite of the lack of IS. The ultimate method for camera/lens stabilization will always be a stable tripod with a quality head attached and a way ...


13

Image Stabilizations only compensates for camera movements. IS has no effect on subject movements. None. Zero. Nada. If your subject is moving, only a shorter exposure time ("faster shutter speed") will reduce the amount of blur caused by the subject's movement. Some related questions here at Photography SE for further reading: What is more important, f-...


11

I have found these lens Nikon AF 70-300mm f/4-5.6G in a very good price. I am planning to use them mainly to take pictures of the moon. I am aware that this lens does not have image stabilisation. Is this a major drawback ? If you plan on shooting a full moon on a clear night, handheld, it shouldn't be, because you can easily get shutter speeds faster than ...


11

You are correct that if the motion were cyclical and never exceeded the limits of the stabilization systems maximum travel then it should be able to last indefinitely. But if motion is in the same direction along an axis eventually the system reaches the limit of its travel. The main limit is with regard to the extent of the range of motion that can be ...


11

Hugin has a tutorial on their website, which made for a good starting point. Tools needed: Hugin ImageMagick Bash shell Create a Hugin project Start Hugin and be sure to select Interface > Advanced (Expert will do, too). Go to the Panorama Stitcher window. Set the Field of View (50° worked well for my smartphone camera), lens parameters and projection ...


10

All tripods are not equal. Even with follow focus types of levers, you still need a more substantial tripod to shoot video when operating the camera with physical inputs than you need to shoot stills using a wired or wireless remote. The legs themselves need to be heavier to resist vibrations. Forget any tripod that requires raising a center column to get ...


10

The monopod removes three degrees of liberty: distance from ground is fixed, and roll and pitch are linked to position in space. But you are overlooking that you are no longer lifting the (potentially heavy) lens, so its shaking is no longer caused by your muscular control, itself affected by muscular fatigue(*). Of course the 55-250mm is a rather light ...


9

The multi-exposure suggestion of @junkyardsparkle is best for a sudden transition, but for a smooth one, add a handle to the ring so that you can apply only tangential force. For example, apply a hose-clamp with a bit of cardboard or wire, bent at a right angle, to the ring and tighten very gently. Then just apply slow and gentle pressure to the end of the "...


8

If there is any impact, not having image stabilization will improve the lens performance on a tripod. When using image stabilization, there has to be some room for parts of the lens to move freely. Without image stabilization they can use more of a solid mount. When using a tripod, you normally turn image stabilization off even if the lens has it, ...


8

I have experimented with this and found that I got blobs instead of sharp Stars with IS on. I had a Canon 7D with an EF 35mm f/2 IS Lens, mounted on top of an Equatorial Mount on top of the actual Telescope. Both the “Right Ascension” and the “Declination” Axis’ were each driven with their own Motorised Clock drives in sync with the motion of the sky. The ...


8

The correct answer totally depends upon the specific lens and also upon the manner in which you desire to use it. Even when using a lens on a tripod, some lenses require you to turn IS off, some do it automatically for you, and others actually have IS modes specifically created for tripod use. The last category includes Canon's Super Telephoto series that ...


8

All in all for the shutter time and subject matter you did very well to get a photo as clean as you did. Here are the causes of the imperfections you notice in your photo: The people in the photo are moving too fast for the shutter time of 1/80 second. Don't be afraid to push the ISO up to 400 or even 800 so that you can use a shutter time of 1/320 or 1/...


8

... I thought it could have been caused by either poor lens quality, bad auto-focus, or motion blur, or is it perhaps something else? If the problem is motion blur, you typically see a slight double-image or slight translucent "ghosting" around moving parts. You'll also notice more blur where there's motion vs. where there isn't any. There may be some ...


7

There is a technical reason for not incorporating image stabilisation in a typical high speed Gauss type lens. Optical IS requires a moving lens component that displaces the image laterally without defocusing. This can be done in most multi-component asymmetric constructions, by moving some component controlled by a stabilising sensor. However the heavier ...


7

Your camera is an interchangeable lens camera. You can buy other lenses with the Nikon mount and use any of them. That includes lenses with VR — vibration reduction — even if the lens which came with the camera does not have that feature. Note that entry-level Nikon cameras like yours do not have focus motors built into the body, so assuming you want auto-...


7

According to Olympus themselves, the rotation of the earth is stopping them going beyond 6.5 stops (and then something to do with the gyroscope). I read this on an article today on PetaPixel, who themselves lifted it from Amateur Photographic where they had an interview with Olympus Deputy Division Manager Setsuya Kataoka: The in-body stabilization ...


7

Assuming there's nothing going on in the scene, you could shoot it as a time-lapse: take one frame of the initial focus, take number of intermediate focus steps that you want (duration of change in seconds x 30, probably) and a final frame. If shooting this way still creates jitter, you can align the shots in software before creating the video. The first and ...


7

Garbage-In, Garbage-Out A big problem with using DSLR photos as "ground truth" for the improvement of cell-phone photos is the assumption that DSLR photos are necessarily better than cell phone photos. It is possible to make a DSLR photo that closely matches a phone photo by closely matching the FOV and DOF. The lenses you will be using have relatively ...


7

The general rule of thumb is that, for a non-vr lens, a photographer of average skill can take a stable image at a shutter speed of 1/{focal length}. So at full zoom, 1/300 of a second shutter speed is the slowest you can go unless your hands are uncommonly stead. Depending on the model year, the VR version of that lens compensates for 4-4.5 stops of camera ...


7

It's instructive to look where monopods are most often used: sporting events, and shooting wildlife. In all of these cases, it's not a matter of "how many stops" a monopod can provide. It's simply a matter of increasing the keeper rate of shots. Competitive Sports (football, soccer, etc.) Monopod are ubiquitous along the sidelines of professional football (...


6

It is very popular. Most brands have adopted it. The only hold outs are Nikon and Canon. Pentax, Sony and Olympus use in-body stabilization on their latest lineup of DSLRs and mirrorless cameras. Panasonic has 2 high-end models with stabilization and the rest without. There is a tremendous advantage in having stabilization in the body. Not only do you incur ...


6

This is generally not true. The image stabilization should be helping in that range. However, you can't expect miracles. Olympus claims 5 stops of stabilization on that model, and, taking that down to a realistic real-world three stops, that means 1/5th second has the blur from camera shake you might otherwise expect at 1/40th of a second. Maybe a little ...


6

Do the benefits of a gimbal combine with in-body or optical image stabilization? Yes it does, a gimbal counters macro movements while IS counter micro movements. They do work combined, although a gimbal would not reduce the need for IS, since the movement countered are not really the same. A gimbal won't do as a tripod replacement in long exposures, and ...


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