Podcast #128: We chat with Kent C Dodds about why he loves React and discuss what life was like in the dark days before Git. Listen now.

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You'll want to take it to a professional retoucher or risk going through several students to achieve a finished product. They would likely use digital means, such as scanning the photo then using software like Photoshop to do the actual correction, because while physically retouching the photo is possible it's usually not preferred because of cost, time, and ...


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On Windows 7 have used free batch converter Converseen to convert HEIC to JPG. Retains EXIF. http://converseen.fasterland.net/


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Looks like it was left out bent or something. It's been exposed to uv and it has lost a lot of info - a lot of the black ink. The problem is that the main defect is a gradient. I made a copy of the top half and used a gradient on the bottom so it blends. Then added contrast and darkened the top and removed a little contrast and lightened the bottom. Did a ...


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A professional retoucher/restorer might be able to do it. I've got to admit it's probably beyond my abilities. The sky isn't too difficult to clean up, & getting rid of the small dings & scratches is time-consuming but not difficult [so I didn't do much of that except for the big one in the sky], but that stripe across the middle is tough. Maybe if ...


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Tried running the image processor/action with a SAVE AS PNG as final step of action and it does not work. Despite save as png, final files are JPG with white background...when I want transparency. Bridge must override/default to JPEG as final batch processing. Frustrating. Why only three options? I prefer the transparent background of a PNG.


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I've just come across this (now almost) 9 year-old question. There is some good information in these answers, but many are quite old now, and none really answer the OP's original question: Can software auto-detect image focus? After reviewing the posts here, I found an application called Fast Raw Viewer that has at least a partial solution.


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Depending on what you're focusing on (how close the subjects are from the cameras), you're experiencing the unavoidable effects of parallax due to capturing images from two different perspectives. In photography, perspective is the conceptual point of view of the camera — the actual position of the entrance pupil (apparent location of the iris or aperture) ...


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I will try to explain with the simplest math terms possible. If you want to skip the math, jump to part II, if you want to get the short answer skip to Part III Part I Frequency of a signal means the number of occurrences of a repeating event per unit of time. So if the unit of time is seconds then frequency is measured with Herz: 1Hz = 1/s. So a signal ...


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