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2

I will attempt to explain how the grain you are seeing is a product of the settings of your shot, and try to keep it simple without photography jargon or math. Your photo has the settings f6.3, 1/1000, ISO 1600, 210mm. And I think those are decent settings for the image you took. A bee moves fast so 1/1000 is fast enough to get a crisp enough image of its ...


14

why is it grainy in the background You chose to limit the amount of light collected by the sensor to the point Poisson distribution noise has a noticeable effect. Instead of shooting at ISO 1600, f/6.3, and 1/1000 you could probably have used something like ISO 400, f/4.5 , and 1/500. Your image would have been the same brightness, but you would have ...


14

It's called "photon shot noise." For a given intensity of light there is also a given amount of noise; and the noise component is equal to √(photons/time/area). So, with more light intensity/availability there is also more noise; but also a better SNR (signal to noise ratio), which results in a less noisy image (because the noise is buried under ...


5

Using ISO1600 tells the camera to aim for 1/16th of the exposure it would need for a full quality image. If you want to get better results, you need more light (and then can lower the ISO). More light can be gotten by a wider aperture (at this scale and a good autofocus, you should certainly be able to go wider one or two stops while still having at least ...


3

I'll leave it to people smarter than me for exactly why it happens, but fixing it in post is often not too difficult. In Photoshop, there are noise reduction routines, this from CameraRAW… turning into Or from OnOne NoNoise AI, just at default settings click for larger


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