New answers tagged

1

IMHO copying colors from one to the other isn't going to work. What you want is a smooth transition, if the layers overlap you just add a layer mask to the top one with a black to white gradient along the edge to make it fade: If you want to tweak the colors you try this. But I agree with the comments that a panorama stitching app such as Hugin is likely to ...


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Oh yeah a quick and easy way that is kind of a cheat way is to go to Colors, Colorize then try to match it with the others layer's colour


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With scanning, the DPI of the scan becomes the PPI of the digital image at a 1:1 reproduction. And 300PPI is about the limit of human vision for someone young with better than 20/20 vision (for most people/viewing conditions it's more like 200PPI). So the general recommendation was to scan at 300DPI and print at 300PPI... and that still continues today (...


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The thing is… you don't really calibrate to something specific, unless that's your only ever input and output type. Calibrating to sRGB would mean you could never see outside that gamut - a bit of a waste with a screen that can almost achieve P3. Let's assume you never (or rarely) need to calibrate for commercial print, which is a whole different ball-game (...


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As nobody did mention it so far: The best method to reduce the sodium light effect is to add more light with a more complete spectrum, maybe a flash light. As other answers indicated: You cannot amplify (white balance) what isn't there (Like seeing red in deep water).


1

I think the key to the correct answer is "What did you expect to see?". For example if you take a shot of a completely green wall with auto white balance: Do you expect the wall photo to be more green or more gray? Auto white balance does not understand what it "sees": It will try to find some "white" and use that as a base. Now ...


1

There are many potential variables, but one thing to understand is that the raw files do not have an inherent color cast... nor color for that matter. What you see in LR depends on the profile applied to the raw data. Is the same profile applied to both (e.g. adobe standard)? Even if the same profile is applied, it is most likely not the same... i.e. the ...


1

It seems likely that at least one of your light sources in the example image may be variable. That is, they don't output a constant intensity and color signature. Many types of artificial lighting flicker with the cycle of the alternating current that powers them. At the peak of the alternating current's sine wave they are brighter, bluer, and fuller ...


8

I think this is mainly an artefact of image processing, combined with the light in the photo. This could be accidental or deliberate. A crude automatic white balance process could get confused by all the green and shift the colours away from it (i.e. towards purple), especially if the image is also being lightened. The post was old, so in-camera white ...


-1

LED flash is not white colour (continous spectrum like sun or edison or tungsten bulb). LED is RGB, a mixture of red, green, blue light. Cheaper / older (pseudo-)white LEDs accomplish this by using three separate LEDs (R + G + B). And as others have noticed there is a severe magenta cast in the flash picture which means there is no green in the picture. ...


13

My assumption is that the auto white balance took over. The image, because you took the photo pretty close is dark everywhere except the brass. If the auto white balance is turned on, the warm tint of it was turned into a neutral color, gray. See if it is the case. Take a test photo with white paper below. The camera will notice this white and use it to ...


1

The first shot is by ambient light. Likely this is warm shop florescent with maybe a mix of standard tungsten bulbs. It is this warm lighting that enhances brass. The second shot is flash. Modern flash outputs a colder light. Actually it simulates north blue sky lighting. You can try setting different color temperature or you could use a image editing ...


1

Well, no EXIF data to go by. The second looks like using a "Sepia" color filter. That would be my first guess, particularly given what happens to color in the rest of the image. A second guess is that brass is actually highly reflective in the UV and near-UV parts of the color spectrum where the human eye is considerably less sensitive than ...


1

Which color profile is more realistic and like life? There is no way to know without calibrating your display. If color accuracy matters, buy a colorimeter. Older models are cheap and better than not calibrating at all. According to How to Color Calibrate Your Mac’s Display, the default profile is probably Color LCD, but depends on the specific display ...


2

Unless you have a colorimeter to make an accurate profile, the best profile is the default profile, which will depend on your exact MBP model. In System Prefs > Displays > Colour check the box for 'Show profiles for this display only' which will include system defaults plus any custom profiles specifically made for that display.


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