New answers tagged

1

Use EOS Utility. Once the camera and EOS Utility have initialized a connection the camera will return to a normal state that will allow you to operate it normally. To send each image directly to the computer as it is taken, choose the "Remote Shooting" option. You can operate the camera directly or via the EOS Utility application.


1

You need to use some sort of software that can perform tethered shooting. Simply plugging a camera into the computer's USB port will by default, as you've discovered, treat the camera/card like an external drive. You must have and run an application that can recognize a Canon dSLR and communicate with it to transfer/display files for shooting. Something ...


-2

I have two 64GB SDXC cards and have exactly the same problem. so there goes my money.


0

It’s absolutely crazy in this day and age you have to tuck every photo individually to upload. I’ve just returned from a weeks trip with 700 photos!


0

My lens works for a few shots in auto-focus and wont be able to focus again; even when i turn the camera on and off.... when i click all i hear is a lens struggling to get a focus and thats it.... it never auto-focuses


-1

My only problem is that I have to stay close to the camera with the phone and always keep it on otherwise if phone closes, camera lost connection. IF you are planning to take a pic for 15 min or longer, than it is a pain. Canon 5000D with Canon Remote app. thanks for answer


0

The dying battery is sending bad info. The camera and charger have different tolerances and detection systems because there needs are different. You need a new battery.


1

I am going to break stride and suggest you shoot indoor architecture from a tripod. Shoot at f8 and don't worry about the shake or ISO because you are on a tripod. You will want to pick up a radio trigger, too. The Yungnuo is cheap and it works. As far as IS lenses are concerned, The Tamron 17-50 f2.8 is decent, but I think you should skip the IS and ...


0

My primary recommendation would be 18-135mm f/3.5-5.6 IS nano USM lens. The reason is that most crop zoom lenses are really poor in sharpness, this one is a bit less poor than others. But only by a bit. (The 17-55mm f/2.8 would be a bit less poor in sharpness if you nail focus and won't fully zoom in to >50mm, but read on for its focus problems.) Also, the ...


0

If I was you I would get a 17-55 f2.8 IS USM, its a really good lens for APS-C and you could get it used for 300-400 USD.


1

Ok, for future people searching for this issue, I think this is resolved. The issue (for me, at least) was not enough light on the target. I was doing the testing indoors, beside a window mid-day (curtains open) and below a tungsten dining room light. But this was not enough light on the target for the auto focus to perform it's best. IIRC, my shutter ...


0

In a way you could say that autofocus is less reliable when a lens is zoomed... if you do not correspondingly increase the focus distance. More accurately; what happens is that the depth of focus decreases, which makes any focus errors more apparent (there is always an error tolerance; there has to be). Also, many zoom lenses have more optical errors at ...


2

I have the EOS R and I use the Fv mode almost exclusively. What does it do? Fv "Flexible Priority" mode lets you adjust aperture, shutter speed, ISO sensitivity, and/or exposure compensation without leaving the Fv mode. In Fv mode: you turn the "Quick Control Dial" (the back wheel) to move the cursor between the four different settings. With the desired ...


0

This is something I've wanted to do also. The website DPReview has numerous videos that appear to be a recording of the view through an optical viewfinder of a DSLR camera (for example). I've not been able to discover how they do this, but it can't be a huge secret. I've made inquiries at a couple of the large photo equipment retailers that didn't reveal ...


1

On my A720 there is a similar double move needed. The button is pressed down and made to slide, then it needs to be held down and pushed at right angles to the initial slide. It is similar but not identical to the two red arrows at right angles near A on the picture above.


2

It appears to be an early Pentax "K" mount. The recessed Aperture Simulator slot opposite the Aperture control lever is the clue. This slot is clearly visible in your first photo. There are lots of inexpensive adapters available to mount Pentax "K" mount lenses on your Canon EOS Rebel XS. This one costs about $15. Vello Pentax K Lens to Canon EF-S-...


34

For all practical purposes, any of the EF-S 18-55mm f/3.5-5.6 IS/IS II/IS STM lenses are totally redundant if you already have an EF-S 17-85mm f/4-5.6 IS in good working condition. What you should not do is buy another lens because it is very marginally better on paper than your current lens. That's how you waste money on GAS (Gear Acquisition Syndrome). ...


1

Why not take both and find out? The whole point of interchangeable lens cameras is having multiple lenses, and starting with both will give you a lot of learning experience early on about how lenses differ. Also, you might want to add some prime lenses and a 70-210 as soon as you have some money to spare ... Many readers here will have more than 5 lenses, ...


1

Not much to say after Hueco's answer. You do not get a new lens just because. Find out what you need and what your current lens lacks and based on that you get a new lens. But in general terms, you do not buy a lens that has similar characteristics to the one you have. You could go for a prime 85mm lens for portraits, or a zoom telephoto, or an ultra-wide ...


21

The EF-S 18-55mm has had many iterations over the years...so when you say you're considering the 18-55mm, you need to be specific to the EF-S 18-55mm f/3.5-5.6, EF-S 18-55mm f/3.5-5.6 II, EF-S 18-55mm f/3.5-5.6 IS, EF-S 18-55mm f/3.5-5.6 IS II, or EF-S 18-55mm f/3.5-5.6 IS STM? I'm assuming that you're shopping new lenses, so you'd run into either the IS ...


2

The 17-85 has image stabilization which all in all allows you to take better photos. That combined with a larger zoom range makes it more universal.


0

I'm on my 4th Sigma 18-250 mm lens I have had the same autofocussing issue with 3 of them. The Sigma warranty is only for a year and it takes more than a year for the problem to develop. Lubrication seems to be a likely answer from dood above and having taken my first lens apart, I would not recommend a DIY approach. I sent one lens back to Sigma but it cost ...


0

Please take a photo outside, as well as indoors. As mentioned in another post the light can be firing at 120hz or 60hz, in which case you may get a partial shutter since speeds over 1/250th are traveling slits. Cheap LED lights have crap regulation and dimming, and pulse on and off. You can see this by waving your hand and noting all of the ghost fingers ...


3

Possible answers: broken shutter or mirror mechanism. Please test, if that also happens when you take pictures outside in sunlight. dimmable, very slow LED light. LEDs cannot be dimmed via voltage reduction. So the LEDs are pulsed to use the persistence of vision to create a dimming effect. If your shutter is fast enough and the LED lighting bad enough, the ...


1

The only reason I can think of is that the light source is a stroboscope. If the light is on before the opening curtain is fully open, or after the closing curtain is closing, but off for some or all of the time the shutter is fully open, then this would be the effect. But then it would be a different part of the photo that would be exposed every time. If it ...


24

Full disclosure: A Canon EOS 50D was what I consider my first "real" DSLR after moving up from an EOS Rebel XTi/400D that was my first DSLR of any kind. The Rebel felt like a high priced toy. The 50D felt like the film SLRs I learned on in the 1980s. I have no attachment whatsoever to the Rebel XTi. I gave it away years ago. I'll probably never let go of ...


2

The 50D is a bit outdated but it is still fairly OK. The 50mm isn't the "normal" lens for a 50D that has an APS-C sensor. It can be OK for portrait but for travel/street/landscape you want a 35mm or a zoom with 35mm at mid-range. The entry-level Canon DLSRs come with a 18-55mm that you can find for cheap on Amazon or second-hand. There are however numerous ...


0

I am wondering if this body is still good for investing money for buying lenses for it. Looking at the specs the ISO range is 100-3200, but imagine there would be considerable noise @ 1600. If you only want to shoot daytime, or invest in lighting, or always shoot < f4, then this could work for you. The max resolution is 4752 × 3168. If you wish to print ...


8

This is a tough one & the decision eventually has to be yours. These days it's considered that the camera body is essentially a disposable item, the lenses are the investment - yet you're starting with a free camera body, which is bound to influence your lens choice initially. Nikon & Canon lenses are really not interchangeable, so you won't be ...


0

It depends on the camera and TC, but the 7D MkII disables the PDAF module function at f/8, whether it's an effective reduction or physical reduction; when it is disabled you get nothing from it. But if you use a TC that doesn't report aperture (3rd party or tape over the pin) it will continue to function at f/8 and beyond. Rather, I should say that it will ...


1

No, you won't. The AF doesn't work because the AF system is not in proper operating conditions, and focus confirmation and AF use the same source. Tested this on my own setup (Sigma 120-400 f/4.5-5.6, 1.4x extender, EOS 70D): I get neither AF nor focus confirmation at the long end (f/8), but I get both at the short end (f/6.3), and they disappear at the ...


0

Short: Yes, IMHO you will get focus confirmation. Long: If you do not press anything on the camera you will not get any AF confirmation. And for me the reason is sample: the camera processor do not get anything from focusing subsystem. But if you halfpress the shutter or press the back button (if you use back focus button) you will get confirmation (tested ...


2

Your photo shows the mode selector knob at "Night Portrait" mode. Is that as far as it can physically move? If your mode dial selector knob physically will not turn to the "Video" mode, your camera is broken and needs to be serviced. There can be no other explanation as to why the knob will not move to Video mode. If the knob will move to "Video" but ...


Top 50 recent answers are included