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One of the other answers, by @Marco, has a negative score, and that is the one that I ended up preferring: exiftool -b -PreviewImage IN.ARW > OUT.jpg As pointed out in the comments, this has the disadvantage of not preserving the full resolution of the image. On my 14-year-old camera, the preview image extracted by ExifTool is 1616 x 1080, not quite the ...


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There's no such thing as a "pure RAW file" that you can see on your computer's screen as a viewable image. Ditto for your camera's rear LCD screen. What you see on the camera's screen is a JPEG preview generated using the in-camera settings at the time the image was taken. What you see on your computer screen is one of several possibilities, but in ...


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This issue was solved a long time ago in visual effects with traditional CG renders. The images are computed internally in a float linear space (ACES is the standard). The values of the image are not clamped. Shadows would have a value of around .1 and below, diffuse white would be around .9, bright highlights and the sun could be anywhere from 1 to infinity....


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If you're working in a session- No. The preview proxies (.cop files) are in fact rendered image files (since they are the previews you see in the Viewer panes. Without source files, the session can't reference anything to process. If you're working in a catalog- Somewhat. Since the source files are gone, the images will be marked Offline. You can, however, ...


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Image Processor lets you select folders only. You have to keep all files in one folder. Create subfolders (separate for RAW and separate for JPGs etc.). You can easily sort all files based on their extension in File Explorer (sort folder content by "Type"), then drag & drop into specific folders.


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