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2

Does it use just some generic manufacturing info or can it take into account some programmed calibration data stored in the lens, as predicted by Roger Cicala in “This Lens Is Soft” and Other Facts? Yes. It uses both. In comments to some of his more recent blog posts Roger has discussed what happens after a lens' optical alignment is adjusted as part of a ...


2

I imported several .cr2 images into Lightroom, exported them as .tif without any adjustments... There's no such thing. If you are seeing an image on your screen and/or exporting a TIFF, the raw data is being interpreted in one of a countless number of possible legitimate interpretations. If you "made no adjustments" it just means you are leaving the default ...


1

What you see is likely not the RAW image, but the JPEG thumbnail/preview that is included in the RAW, which is what you usual picture viewer is going to find and display. To see the RAW at full size, you have to open it with a proper application. The camera normally comes with a CD/DVD to install such apps (SilkyPix, for Lumix cameras), or it can be ...


8

Don't worry — the RAW files are the full resolution. They contain all of the data recorded by the camera. The option to change resolution is grayed out because there's no in-camera way to reduce it, not because it is stuck on small. However, for that data to be viewed, it need to be interpreted. See What does an unprocessed RAW file look like? for more on ...


2

The camera's built-in playback mode knows to just show you JPEG files when reviewing when a RAW also exists — there'd be no point in separately showing the RAW preview (whih will be identical). Then, you say imported photo on my phone. You note that you're transferring via the Snapbridge app. Unfortunately, these apps are made for quick social media sharing ...


2

According to this Nikon page, NEF transfer in SnapBridge is only available if your camera supports WiFi (Bluetooth would likely be too slow), and as far as I can tell the D3500 has no WiFi.


1

What camera mode? There are several of the auto "Scene" modes where raw recording is not possible. That is my guess. See page 48 of the D3500 Reference Manual, free at https://downloadcenter.nikonimglib.com/en/products/471/D3500.html


1

If you reduce the brightness of the raw image you processed yourself to match the jpeg image processed by the camera, the noise will probably be very similar. Another way of looking at it is that if you increase the brightness of the camera produced jpeg image to match the brightness of the raw file you processed, it will show just as much noise as the raw ...


1

On your RAW image after noise reduction applied, there is still too much color (or chromatic) noise. You have basically 2 main kind of noise: luminance noise and color noise (also named chromatic noise). (more details about the 2 kind of noise here). I am not familiar with ACDSee but according to their website, you can indeed fine tune both noise reductions (...


0

You need to apply noise reduction algorithms. Please note that not all RAW programs can replicate what the camera does: How to reproduce camera noise reduction using open source software? Almost(?) all RAW programs have at least some form of noise reduction, but it may not exactly match the camera's noise reduction. YMMV. I recommend trying at least ...


35

In my opinion, none of the other answers addresses the obvious misconception in the question: There is no use in converting a JPG (comparatively low quality) to a RAW file (high quality), because you do not gain anything. The reason why people shoot in RAW is that, as others have stated, RAW captures all the sensor data and saves it in a file. JPGs have ...


2

Basically no. To explain a bit further a raw image stores the input as it comes off the sensor, so each pixel will have a single colour and 12-16 bit value depending on your model of camera. A jpeg file will have 3 colours for each pixel with every chanel at 8 bits. In saving as a jpeg the camera will have taken the raw data and processed it to jpeg ...


19

In the absence of real raw files, the JPG is your "raw". Most image editors, including Lightroom, can open or import JPGs. You may choose to save in another format while editing, but do not lose or destroy the original JPGs. Also take care not to save over the original files. It is possible to convert JPGs to DNG. But it's usually used to test and develop ...


1

RAW files contain ALL the image information that was captured by the sensor. The conversion, or export, to JPG removes some of that information in the name of making a file that is smaller in size and that (normally) looks good in its native (Saved As...) resolution. Basically, a JPG only has enough info to display the image. Once that JPG is created, the ...


0

The problem with digital isn't storage, it's the cameras. Data can't deteriorate and all the ways of storing data are vastly superior to storing film. Stop and think about a memory stick or disc saving compared to a container of film. Digital cameras are what age. Regular film cameras produce images with virtually infinite resolution. Whatever light was ...


2

Digital files do not "deteriorate" over time. However, the storage media that contain them can, which leads to file corruption. Raw files are typically several times the size of JPGs, so the likelihood of a raw file becoming corrupt is several times that of the corresponding JPG becoming corrupt. Giving the photographer the benefit of the doubt, he may be ...


9

RAW files no more deteriorate over time than a DOC file would. As long as you store them correctly (with backups of course) the file will be fine. It's true that the software that you use to process them will change but in general that is a positive. Files from older cameras often look much better in modern RAW processing software than at the time they were ...


0

Another way data deteriorates is because it is written to media that deteriorates. A typical examples is CDs and DVDs. This can cause files to be either corrupted, or be damaged. I'm not sure how much CRC (related) checks a RAW image contains, if not much, than there will be likely more deterioration (otherwise corrupted files, or at least warnings). ...


4

Yes, but in a different way than you imagine. Raw files don't contain an image. They contain raw sensor data. This raw sensor data must be interpreted to create an image. Software may change over time, so this interpretation of the raw data to create pixel values could change. If you use the exact same software version for the next 20 years or so, this ...


2

It won't be an identical file to your cameras compressed option, but the free Adobe app called DNG Converter will compress it. The new file type will be .DNG, but it is still raw. DNG was proposed as a new universal standard, which didn't quite happen, but many raw editors likely will work with the DNG files. Experiment with just one file first. Source ...


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