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I found ImageVerifier to work pretty well for both raws & jpgs on Windows. It seems to be abandonware at this point, so I've archived the latest version here: ImageVerifier 2.11 (see included .txt file to remove limitations)


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That DateTimeOriginal tag is located in an extremely old and outdated group, not in the EXIF data. Windows wouldn't know how to read the APP14 PictureInfo group and I doubt that there are many programs outside of exiftool and maybe exiv2 that would even be able to see that data. The command you would want to use with exiftool to copy that data to the EXIF ...


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If you are exposing to the right by increasing the amount of light collected (AP/SS) then you are maximizing the amount of light collected, and maximizing the amount of data/information for generating the picture (and increases recorded dynamic range). If you are applying higher ISO (ITTR), then no...there is no real benefit as ISO is not exposure/...


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If someone is getting the results they want without deliberately Exposing to the Right, I am not sure why they would change. But anyway… The math is the same. Bits are bits. Having fewer in a jpg file doesn’t change that. The most significant bit always carries twice as much information as the less significant bits. The high bit of an eight bit jpg channel ...


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It depends on whether you are planning to postprocess, like lifting shadows or other contrast adjustments. JPEG compression relies on throwing image information away that it considers indistinguishable to the viewer. If you postprocess in a manner that makes stuff more visible, JPEG compression may already have thrown away what it thinks you don't need. ...


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As far as I am concerned, no, because ETTR will require post-processing, and global color adjustments on 8-bit/channel images entails color loss. So you have better get the JPEG as correctly exposed as possible.


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When previewing the images in windows photos you are probably viewing the embedded jpeg images with default camera processing applied. If you used Canon's software, that can apply the camera's jpeg settings to the raw file, I suspect you would have much more consistent results.


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