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2

Pixel sizes are anywhere from 1 to 10+ microns in size and the size and the way they are configured/positioned compared to one another determines their light-gathering abilities. Cramming too many pixels on to a sensor may make it sound like you have a high megapixel (millions of pixels) camera but it was misleading. Improvements in processors over the years ...


3

I'm not clear on your question. I note that a 55mm equivalent divided by a 3.19 crop factor suggests a 17mm lens. Pixels don't have sizes. Sensors have sizes, and pixels can be presented as pixels per inch as a function of your print or display. Pixels may even be referred to as having a size derived from how they are constructed from the sensors, but in ...


0

Most image editors (for isntance, GIMP, which is free to download) have "burn" and "dodge" tools. These works like the same name techniques in darkroom printing -- burning darkens the chosen area, and dodging lightens it. These are usually used with moderately sized circular, soft-edge tool that's moved while working so it produces a relatively minimal ...


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I’d suggest starting off by trying to get your main light source as close as possible to the book so that the fall off of light reduces the illumination of the person (due to the inverse square law). You might need a second light, positioned behind the person, to provide some separation from the background.


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Though this is little more than my own opinion, I think it's lacking in punch. Even for a low-key image, I'd usually push the whites to white - lift the specular highlights. If you were looking at this scene 'live' the store lighting would be really quite blinding compared to ths darkness your eyes were acclimatised to. It would be pushing that light out ...


4

Your question seems to be more related to image brightness when displayed rather than "exposure." This comes down to having a calibrated monitor and screen brightness appropriate for the ambient levels. A tool I use is a gamma test strip... I have it embedded into the Lightroom interface as the "identity plate." If I can't see the difference between the ...


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personnellement j'utilise DPP pour convertir le CR3 au format TIFF, puis je traite avec Darktable. la convertion CR3 au format DNG n'est pas visible dans Darktable non plus In English (roughly): Personally, I use DPP to convert CR3 to TIFF format, then I work with Darktable. Converting CR3 to DNG isn't available in Darktable either.


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