New answers tagged

2

"Haze" from the standpoint of landscape photography is not only natural but also necessary for pictorial perception. Key to this understanding is to not consider it as a fault but as an attribute. This is easier if you consider the term used by artists in creating a similar view. Aerial perspective is the term used for the appreciation of depth within the ...


2

Deciding which image is "closer" to original is a judgement call that requires you to examine the image contents, but the second file is probably "closer" because: Software rarely automatically names files according to faces recognized within the image. The second file has the typical prefix-date naming scheme. Display P3 vs sRGB. The first file has gone ...


3

You can't really tell from these data. Of course, one could hope that the bigger file holds a bit more information, but it could just be the other one badly re-encoded. Utilities such as ImageMagick's identify can tell you the JPEG "quality" setting (and the chroma sub-sampling) but you can still be looking at a re-encoding that caused some data loss. If ...


4

You can't "fix" distance haze. You can try compensate for it, but you cannot fix it. None of what follows is in any way definitive, it's 5 mins in Photoshop & really rough The method I would have used for your posted image would be HDR - 3 exposures, merge afterwards - but we're too late for that. So we're left with 'fudging'. If you mask out the '...


1

The most likely reason is LED event lighting (DMX cans, video projectors etc.) using fast and complicated modulation patterns for dimming or color choice. These units will not actually dim the light, instead switching it on an off at an extreme speed. Classic light dimmers work in a similar way, but incandescent lighting is too slow to follow the switching ...


-2

Sensor noise. At ISO 3600 you are going to see it because the noise is amplified along with the ISO.


0

It is normal to see pixelation when zooming in past 100%. It's also normal to not see pixelation. To zoom in to 100% means there is a 1-1 correspondence between the image pixels and display pixels. When zooming in past 100%, there are "gaps" between pixels that need to be filled in for display. (May be thought of as "stretching out" the pixels to fill the ...


0

The iPhone 6's rear camera shoots 3264 x 2448 pixel photos. If you zoom in 4 times, you're looking at a quarter of those pixels, which is 816 x 612 pixels. Your monitor likely displays 1920 x 1080 pixels or larger. If you want to display a 816 x 612 pixel image on the entirety of such a monitor, it has to 'stretch out' these pixels so it fills up the ...


0

400% is not just fully zoomed in - it is much more than fully zoomed in. In some cases it may be beneficial to view photos at 100% but I can't think of a use-case for viewing at more than that. To answer your question, it would be very strange (or completely incorrect and misleading even) if you didn't see pixelation at 400% magnification.


0

You asked: How important is a good quality camera for good photography? Up to a certain point, very important. I have owned numerous small sensor cameras, ranging from compact pocket cameras to mobile phone cameras. All of these, with no exception, are completely useless unless used in outdoor daylight (or unless mounted on a tripod and taking pictures of ...


0

You can ask similar questions in other arts: Can you create a great sculpture from cheap materials (of course you can!); can you make great movies on a small budget (of course you can!); can you make great music on cheap instruments (of course you can!); etc. One could get the impression that a certain scarcity of means makes artists more creative. But ...


0

It depends on what you're trying to do. When you're just learning the basics, the equipment most likely does not matter, though you do want access to manual exposure and focusing controls. The lens on a smartphone camera generally doesn't allow for aperture control and the small sensor will prevent you from meaningfully experimenting with depth of field. A ...


0

Quality of a camera usually increases the control of the photographer. That said, I have seen what I call 'better' photographs from a cheap 35mm junk camera than an expensive rig. Understanding the limits and variations of your current equipment will help reduce the equipment's effect and maximize what your artistic sense is trying to get at. Know why what ...


0

I use the Canon Camera Connect application in Android, and it has the same resolution as using the SD card. What I see as an advantage is that you could send RAW types too. So indeed if you like to use the Lightroom Android version it could be useful.


3

How important is a good quality camera for good photography? It's often said that a good photographer supposedly, "Can make any photo good with any camera." Define "good" ;) If you care about things like resolution, low light ability, dof control, raw image format, etc, then yes, the quality and expense of the camera does matter for your photographs. ...


2

I take roughly the opposite view to Иво Недев. It depends significantly on what is meant by amateur and pro - both for the user and the camera AND what the situation is. A top photographer with almost any modern DSLR / mirrorless will be able to achieve superb results in most cases and, IMHO, will be able to achieve superior results to an amateur with a '...


0

Very very recently a well know tech youtuber did an experiment somewhat answering exactly what you're asking. Have a look here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PaJQpgWV9f0 I believe the TLDR is Pro with pro camera > Amateur with pro camera > Pro with amateur camera


14

Gear doesn't matter... until it does. While it is true that better gear won't make you a better photographer, it is equally true that any photographer is limited by the capabilities of the gear being used. It's not just "lesser" types of gear that technically constrain photographers. Even the very best available photographic gear imposes technical limits on ...


3

Great answers here, but I will add my two cents. Not as important as the person using the camera. "Good Photographer" Change the word "good" to "knowledgeable". A Knowledgeable Photographer can not only make even a poor camera work its best but will know how light behaves, and how cameras need to be used to capture the light (and that sensors are ...


8

Think about it like automobiles. A racing car or a semi-trailer truck would be awful to use on a grocery shopping trip no matter how 'pro' those automobiles are. But, someone who is in the business of moving goods across the country isn't going to pick the racing car or the family car either. Most of the professional photographers I've met or read about ...


5

A "Good quality camera" is Very important to good quality photography, however the real question you are looking for is something like "what aspects make for good quality in a camera for a given subject matter?" Cameras are tools, and you use a tool suited to the task at hand. A small tack hammer is not much use in driving railroad spikes or breaking up ...


4

A 'good' camera is much harder to use than a phone. The trade-off between being able to snap precisely what you want rather than what the phone will give you is that to get precisely what you want you have to know precisely how to get it. A good photographer can always get the best out of a phone, because they already know what it will do to their shot. ...


25

As with many things, the end quality depends on the weakest link. Because most cameras are quite good, even cheap ones (even from mobile phones), the weakest link is mostly the person behind the camera. When learning some theory and practice, photographers can work around some pitfalls of cameras, but also knowing the shortcomings of a camera. When that ...


-3

I'm no expert at all, and as another said, I wouldn't know what is typical for a 5D2. But I see this is my Canon Ixus instruction manual: "When you use flash photography at higher ISO speeds, the chances of white streaks appearing in the image increase the closer you approach to the subject". Not sure if relevant,


0

Larger format sizes, be it film or digital, necessitates the use of longer focal lengths lenses. Your question revolves around the projected image cast by the lens and the fact that this image consists of countless super tiny blurred circles called circles of confusion. These are the smallest fraction of a projected image that can convey intelligence. ...


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