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2

Those L lenses age very well. Meaning, there is almost no reason to quickly upgrade to the newer models. It is very reasonable to keep your "old" lenses. Yes, the IS is better now but that's really small differences in really high end products. So I'd start with getting a current body and start shooting. The "old" lenses won't hinder you in any way. IF you ...


4

My colloquial explanation. Image One: It is a big blue clear sky. Oh, and the image is big in size. Basically all the image is blue. Image two: It is a green tree, on a field of colored flowers, (here is one, here is another (repeat several times) there is a farm, a house, there are some clouds, there are a pony and a fence, and next to the fence... But ...


21

For these two photos: as shown by ImageMagick's identify, the bird is JPEG quality 100 and the llamas are JPEG quality 92). This alone would be enough to explain the size difference (the other factor, chroma-subsampling, is the same in both pictures). To put things in perspective, a test picture, exported with various quality settings (all other settings, ...


27

The reasons to have difference in size can be (and most of them are related to image compression): Amount of details in the image. Save flat colour image and another with several colours and you will see the difference Number of colours. Related to above, but if you have more colours and lossy compression you may have bigger image (as size) Level of JPEG ...


4

No, there is no difference between crop mode or cropping in post. Pretty much every image characteristic comes down to light per area. If you record the subject the same size (with the same exposure settings) on a larger sensor, it is recorded physically larger. So you get more area of the same light (larger area/same density). And when output at the same ...


0

I tried the script, provided by RubinMac - it did the job however it is not as accurate as I thought it to be. I enhanced the script and had 3 variance thresholds Upto 100 100 > Variance > 150 150 > Variance > 200 All others were moved to Ok. I found few of the pics placed in the above three criteria were actually very clear and couldn't find the ...


1

Though this is little more than my own opinion, I think it's lacking in punch. Even for a low-key image, I'd usually push the whites to white - lift the specular highlights. If you were looking at this scene 'live' the store lighting would be really quite blinding compared to ths darkness your eyes were acclimatised to. It would be pushing that light out ...


4

Your question seems to be more related to image brightness when displayed rather than "exposure." This comes down to having a calibrated monitor and screen brightness appropriate for the ambient levels. A tool I use is a gamma test strip... I have it embedded into the Lightroom interface as the "identity plate." If I can't see the difference between the ...


3

There is a 4k Andoer camcorder that outputs 48mp stills. If this (or similar) is the camcorder you are using, the reason the still images look so bad is a combination of the following: Small sensor with native resolution of 13/16mp (specs are inconsistent). The image is being upscaled to 48mp. Cheap lens. 7.36mm f/3.2 with digital zoom. Heavy noise ...


0

Several theories: The camera is really cheap and does not even have a 4k resolution. 4k is a lot! 4k is 8.3 megapixels. Even a typical crop DSLR camera lens may not resolve this much detail, even though the sensor of a typical DSLR nowadays has more than 8.3 megapixels. You are running into the optical limits of the lens. In particular, to truly get 4k ...


2

No. Dropbox uploaded JPEGS are bitwise identical to the ones on the phone. I do not know what it does with HEIF images. In any case, Dropbox won't change the images on the device itself. Also, DB doesn't even have an “optimize storage” option.


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