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2

I do not think this artifact is caused by reflections in the optical path. I think this is due to software correction of light falloff as a function of distance from image center (i.e., vignetting compensation). Normally such correction is not very noticeable because the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) is high enough. But in this case, the image is so dark, that ...


6

That very much looks like a reflection of the lens on the protective glass to me... along with another reflection from something outside. It does not look like banding due to editing. This is the kind of thing one might see with an SLR lens that has an uncoated filter on it. IDT there is anything you can really do about it. In more normal conditions it is ...


4

The problem is, any clear piece of plastic or glass that is not FLAT to an extremely precise standard is going to act as a lens or prism of some sort, adding distortions and aberrations. Using a polishing wheel is most certainly not going to help making a surface perfectly flat. In addition, if the surface is plastic, most abrasive compounds you would use ...


2

Polishing is only the last step in a series of steps to get a clear finish. First, you need to get out the scratches, which you do by (counter intuitively) adding more (but smaller) scratches. Polishing compound, on its own (unless you want to spend days polishing the same spot) can't cut deep enough to get down to the scratches. If you want to get those ...


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