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Any optical error that is corrected by stopping down is being added by the periphery of the optical elements. The errors that are greatest at the periphery are astigmatism, field curvature, lateral CA, and Coma. And they are the greatest at the periphery because the light from those areas has to be bent more in order to form the focused image circle. There ...


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There are seven major lens aberrations. So far, they remain a plague as none have been eliminated. We can however mitigate. There are two that are color related (chromatic aberration) and five monochromatic aberrations. Astigmatism is the most complex. Astigmatism is mitigated by carful control of the figure (curve) of the various lens elements. Special ...


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Diffraction is not what causes lack of sharpness in any mainstream setups (as in, you are not operating an aerial camera in a bomber) wide open - at f/2.8, it will come from astigmatism, spherical aberration, operator error, autofocus error, and several other causes that have nothing to do with diffraction. Diffraction is what sabotages the film-era adage "...


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A normal prime for the D60 would be a 35mm. The 50mm would be a good portrait lens. There are plenty of options out there for either, but I'd suggest looking for one that is at least an f1.8, to give yourself some ability to work in low light, since neither of your two zooms is very fast. You also want the lens to be able to take advantage of the D60's ...


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I have previously disassembled and adapted one such lens – Steinheil-Munchin Cassarit 50/2.8. At all distances, it was sharpest when the front element was set to infinity and the entire lens was unit focused with a helicoid adapter. I would expect similar results with similar lenses because there aren't enough elements to correct aberrations when elements ...


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