New answers tagged

1

A reason to select a prime lens, is that for the money, one normally gets a bigger aperture, which lets in more light, or has a more limited depth of field. A second reason prime lenses are used is that for the cost, mass and size they product better image quality with mid-apertures. More light is helpful in limited lighting, like in a church, where flash ...


2

I am currently owning the a7 III, the Tamron 28-75 2.8 and the Sony 85 1.8 which is at the center of your question. Camera The decision between the a7 and the a7r model is he first you should make: Both cams share a lot of traits, however there is more difference than just resolution. Advantages of the a7 III Slightly better performance in low light due ...


5

"(All blue rays are coming from different part of the real world object)" That is incorrect. In the drawing all blue rays are coming from the same point source in the real world; and they are focused into the same point on the image plane as one small part of the image. At every point on the objective lens there is all of the light required for a complete ...


2

Take for example a star. It is massive. It is many times larger than the front of a camera lens. Yet it is so far away that it appears to be a point source of light.¹ Light rays from such a massive object at such a long distance will arrive at the front of the lens as collimated light. That is, they will be parallel to one another. Even point sources of ...


8

The schema (and your interpretation) is misleading. If the blue rays are parallel then they come from a source which is infinitely far away. When you shoot a real object, most of it is off-axis, and if the object is not very far away light rays from it hit the lens with various angles of incidence:


-1

If my camera DOES have a setting to release shutter without lens, how do I get to that setting? Where is it on my camera settings? I have a Canon EOS SL2, and could Sweta I did this, but cannot for the life of me remember how I found the setting to do this. So ANY help would be appreciated I didn't really see a way to sign up with my email, so guess I have ...


0

My lens works for a few shots in auto-focus and wont be able to focus again; even when i turn the camera on and off.... when i click all i hear is a lens struggling to get a focus and thats it.... it never auto-focuses


0

Unless the a6100 precooks raw files in some new way, the important corrections* should be exactly the same as for an a6000 (ILCE-6000) with the same lens attached. Vital corrections for the SELP1650 are all about distortion: Without correction, that lens at 16mm looks like a fisheye run over by a truck, that is why you can't turn it off in camera. CA/...


2

The "Sony E 16-50mm f/3.5-5.6 OSS PZ" lens is listed in lensfun's database as supported starting with version 1.534, but it does not yet appear that there's an entry for the Alpha 6100. If you visit the web site, you can find instructions for generating images to submit for them to analyze to get new cameras and/or lenses supported. The documentation also ...


1

Ok, for future people searching for this issue, I think this is resolved. The issue (for me, at least) was not enough light on the target. I was doing the testing indoors, beside a window mid-day (curtains open) and below a tungsten dining room light. But this was not enough light on the target for the auto focus to perform it's best. IIRC, my shutter ...


0

In a way you could say that autofocus is less reliable when a lens is zoomed... if you do not correspondingly increase the focus distance. More accurately; what happens is that the depth of focus decreases, which makes any focus errors more apparent (there is always an error tolerance; there has to be). Also, many zoom lenses have more optical errors at ...


2

There are several good answers here and I just wanted to point out some things. The diameter of the "mouth" of the lens doesn't have to do with image quality. Sometimes is used for marketing, and sometimes are needed for a bigger elements inside. But given two lenses with same optics and different diameters will have the same projected image on the sensor. ...


0

Thanks @Nate S. for his answer. This looks like the same thing, so yes, SA: https://www.worthpoint.com/worthopedia/sigma-17-70mm-2-4-macro-dc-sigma-sa-1791976047 Solution is Sigma SA Mount


2

It appears to be an early Pentax "K" mount. The recessed Aperture Simulator slot opposite the Aperture control lever is the clue. This slot is clearly visible in your first photo. There are lots of inexpensive adapters available to mount Pentax "K" mount lenses on your Canon EOS Rebel XS. This one costs about $15. Vello Pentax K Lens to Canon EF-S-...


34

For all practical purposes, any of the EF-S 18-55mm f/3.5-5.6 IS/IS II/IS STM lenses are totally redundant if you already have an EF-S 17-85mm f/4-5.6 IS in good working condition. What you should not do is buy another lens because it is very marginally better on paper than your current lens. That's how you waste money on GAS (Gear Acquisition Syndrome). ...


1

Why not take both and find out? The whole point of interchangeable lens cameras is having multiple lenses, and starting with both will give you a lot of learning experience early on about how lenses differ. Also, you might want to add some prime lenses and a 70-210 as soon as you have some money to spare ... Many readers here will have more than 5 lenses, ...


1

Not much to say after Hueco's answer. You do not get a new lens just because. Find out what you need and what your current lens lacks and based on that you get a new lens. But in general terms, you do not buy a lens that has similar characteristics to the one you have. You could go for a prime 85mm lens for portraits, or a zoom telephoto, or an ultra-wide ...


21

The EF-S 18-55mm has had many iterations over the years...so when you say you're considering the 18-55mm, you need to be specific to the EF-S 18-55mm f/3.5-5.6, EF-S 18-55mm f/3.5-5.6 II, EF-S 18-55mm f/3.5-5.6 IS, EF-S 18-55mm f/3.5-5.6 IS II, or EF-S 18-55mm f/3.5-5.6 IS STM? I'm assuming that you're shopping new lenses, so you'd run into either the IS ...


2

The 17-85 has image stabilization which all in all allows you to take better photos. That combined with a larger zoom range makes it more universal.


0

I'm on my 4th Sigma 18-250 mm lens I have had the same autofocussing issue with 3 of them. The Sigma warranty is only for a year and it takes more than a year for the problem to develop. Lubrication seems to be a likely answer from dood above and having taken my first lens apart, I would not recommend a DIY approach. I sent one lens back to Sigma but it cost ...


5

As stated in other answers, many architectural shooters will use a Tilt-Shift lens in order to get straight lines done in camera. Or, for a crop sensor camera, a 10-20mm zoom gives you super wide angles to wide angle in available focal length. But, if we limit things to just your 18-55 and the 24mm prime... Is it as effective as using a 24mm true wide ...


2

No, you'll find you'll need a much, much wider lense for indoor photography. Real estate sells because it's roomy. You need at least 16mm, and possibly as low as 10mm on a 1.6x crop factor camera. You'll also want to condider purchasing or getting good at 'stitching' panos to create wider areas of your room. Yes, it'll distort the room some, but people are ...


1

It doesn't matter which lens you use. Both offer 24mm. However, on your camera, neither will produce 35mm-equivalent 24mm field of view: both will provide the equivalent of 24 x 1.5 = 36mm. This is because the sensor is smaller than 'full frame' 35mm film negative equivalent. So in fact, the 18mm zoom on your kit lens will be wider than the 24mm prime lens ...


1

For architecture photography, people tend to prefer tilt-shift lenses because they can reproduce straight lines more easily - see Wikipedia for more details. You should be able to compensate for lens distortion - which will cause vertical walls to appear curved or "bendy" - that in post with the right lens profile corrections applied, but it is another step ...


-1

All the Helios produce swirly bokeh. I myself have the 44m-6, if you are unable to create swirly bokeh with this then your just not doing it right 😜


3

The Canon EOS D30 used/uses EF mount lenses. All Canon 5-series DSLR camera bodies also use EF mount lenses. Any Canon EF lens that will mount on a canon EOS D30 will also mount and be fully functional on any Canon EOS 5-series camera. The D30, though it used a crop sensor, was(is) an EF only camera. EF-S lenses will not mount on the D30, nor on the D60 ...


2

If all of your lenses do this on the Rebel XTi/400D and none of them do it on another Canon EOS camera, then at first glance the issue would seem to be with the camera body. The more I think about it, the more it seems to me the problem here has to be in the camera body, since voltage is being supplied to the lens even when the camera is turned off. It ...


0

Assuming we are talking about a Canon EOS D30 or EOS 30D (NOT a Nikon D300!): Yes, a lens that fits one of these cameras will fit a 5D mark anything. If the only lens you have is whatever was supplied with an EOS D30 as a kit lens, it might not be satisfactory on a 5D, and it might also not be a full frame lens - though the D30 is so old that it is not ...


2

Years ago, I fitted enlarger lenses to high-speed photofinishing printers I using this this math. It proved accurate enough. Now for the gobbledygook: The negative carrier masks the negative plus we desire some over-spill at the easel. I use an over spill of 1.5% otherwise easel placement to avoid shabby borders is laborious. We now figure magnification ...


4

The recessed board helps in focusing a very short focal lenght enlarging lens (say 30mm, the kind used for enlarging 110 film). A short lens requires such a short distance from the film plane that the bellows extended to minimum would still not suffice, and had to be recessed. This was common issue only for lenses for smaller format that 35mm, which was ...


-1

Lenses are fitted to cameras and projectors (enlargers are subset of projectors) based on the diagonal measure of the film format. As an example, for 35mm film, the format is 24mm by 36mm with a diagonal of 43.3mm. This corner-to-corner measure is somewhat unconventional, talking about lens focal length, thus it is industry standard to round this value up to ...


2

Digital-only solutions: Use a "short" adapter, as rackandboneman suggests. This may also work with rangefinders that have short FFD. Use the yellow filter with custom white balance. Solutions that will also work with film: Black and white photography with the colored filters. Repair the filter using glass from an appropriately sized UV filter. The glass ...


0

I have D7200, I am shooting with Sigma 18-35mm f/1.8 DC HSM Art. The pictures which are coming from this lens are superb. Super sharp even wide open, it really took me by surprise how good it is. At 35mm you have equivalent of 50mm FF. It is a bit heavy lens, around 810 g. A bit more expensive, but the build/image quality is totaly worth it. Another one ...


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