New answers tagged

1

FujiFilm charges more for lenses (than Canon) because they can. FujiFilm has a near monopoly on X-mount lenses. Other options include cheap manual lenses and expensive Zeiss lenses. This is changing somewhat with the introduction of Viltrox autofocus lenses. Image quality of FujiFilm lenses is nearly guaranteed to be very good. Even XC lenses perform above ...


1

This answer is in addition to Michael C's answer. The other part of the story is that lenses are sometimes priced based on what the market will bear. Fuji lenses are expensive compared to some Canon lenses, yes, but they are rather cheap compared to others. For instance look at pairs of standard lenses: a cheaper slightly slower one and a faster generally ...


2

Most of the lower priced Canon lenses are older designs that have long since sold enough copies to recover the R&D cost for Canon. Canon introduced the EF mount in 1987 and many of the current consumer grade lenses trace their lineage back to the early or mid 1990s. The newer Canon lenses in that price range are, for the most part, slight revisions of ...


0

Use manual settings. Set the focus on lens to manual and set to to just before infinity. Set the aperture to wide open. Start with lowest possible ISO, this can be changed if there is movements in the images later. Set the exposure time to a few seconds and use two or 10 seconds timer to take the picture to make sure no movements from your hand will shake ...


0

There are two aspects to that: The coatings (or maybe even choice of optical glasses) will have been made in a way that makes them relatively color-neutral. Do not forget that film had a fixed white balance. Some early lens coatings (single coating era) create a noticeable blue or yellow color cast. As mentioned in other answers, chromatic aberration will ...


1

They are there so that I can still use the exposure meter on my Nikon F2S !


2

Your question comes down to angle of view. It sounds like your camera is on the sidelines somewhere near the pitch, rather than in the stands. Let's use some assumptions to calculate some numbers. You are setting up the camera 10 ft (3 m) from the pitch sideline, at the halfway line. The pitch is standard 69m wide by 100m, try line to try line. Then the ...


1

D5600 shooter here. As limited as it is, the 18-55 kit lens can take really nice photos if you have enough light. Yes it needs plenty of light, but the zoom is nice and the VR works pretty well. Remember that 18-55 on crop is equivalent to 27-78 on full frame, and the 78 is in portrait range. You can do better, but maybe not right away. My everyday ...


0

The 18-35 is a good lens for landscape. It is not a good lens for portraiture. I would advise to have the Nikon 35mm 1.8g for general photography and portrait. It is good, sharp, and cheap. The portrait and macro lens I suggest you is the Nikon 90mm f2.8d.


2

Does it use just some generic manufacturing info or can it take into account some programmed calibration data stored in the lens, as predicted by Roger Cicala in “This Lens Is Soft” and Other Facts? Yes. It uses both. In comments to some of his more recent blog posts Roger has discussed what happens after a lens' optical alignment is adjusted as part of a ...


0

Since you can't get much for the 18-55, I would get the 16-85 for the feeling of improved image quality but keep the 18-55, when you just want to take a lighter kit with you for the causal outing. I did just that, and I really appreciate being able to travel lighter, when I need to, and I also appreciate the better image quality of the 16-85. That extra 2mm ...


3

Your camera body uses a variant of the Nikon F mount, which has the longest Flange Focal Distance of any commonly used 35mm SLR mount. You will be able to fully use the lens with your camera only if it also uses the Nikon F mount. Otherwise, even if you do find an adapter, the lens would lose infinity focus, which would make it useless for anything other ...


0

Focusing accuracy of low f lenses doesn’t have anything to do with DOF, but with the higher luminosity (light that goes thru the glass) of the faster lenses –what you see in the viewfinder of a DSLR with a pentaprism is always the lowest f-stop or larger aperture available in that lens and focusing is done thru the lenses at this f-stop– compared with slower ...


0

Leopard: The main reason this is a better photo, is the leopard looks relaxed and seems like you can reach out and touch it. People can relate to the feeling of the leopard. The tones are warm and harmonious. (People love cats). Gorilla: The gorilla looks distant. It also looks slightly manic. The composition of the photo is not as good as the leopard. The ...


0

Squint your eyes at the pictures. The gorilla is too dark and becomes a jumble whereas the cat is plenty bright. If you look at the histogram of the image, you can see the cat photographer had originally taken the image too dark and someone used a "brightness" control to lighten it. (However, whoever edited it is not a professional as they reduced the ...


1

It sound like your lens is broken. You need to decide if the lens is worth what having a competent technician look at it to see if it is repairable will cost.


15

There is an additional element not taken into account in other answers, the color grading. First, let us compare the two histograms. Here is the kitty one. And here is your photo's As you can see, the kitty's one, even if there are zones that are clearly on a dark shadow, like behind the trunks you do not have any black. This is perceived as a higher ...


2

I see the following: the red ball or tomato draws much attention. the green background look unnatural, like in a zoo. the Gorilla is not doing something interesting. It just sits there and seems to watch the photographer (almost). Again, like in a zoo. the visual path is right into the center and stays there. everything is perfectly symmetrical. The gorilla ...


0

Not sure you need two lenses at that point. You invested over $1000 in a body without even knowing the kind of lenses you want to use? Tamron has a decent 16-300mm that should cover most uses(*). This lets you travel with one single lens, which has lots of advantages. One year from now, look at your picture collection, and see which focal lengths you used ...


2

The best general-purpose lens to start with would cover a "normal" focal length. Your camera has a crop sensor, so normal is about 28-35mm. Some recommendations: Resist the temptation to sacrifice image quality or fast apertures for increased focal-length range in zooms. If you don't want to try random lenses during the next several decades while searching ...


0

While you may need only two lenses given your use cases, you'll want a third lens too, the Nifty Fifty. So, read on: Wildlife: Canon 55-250mm IS STM. It has to be the STM version as that's significantly better than the non-STM version. Avoid the cheap non-stabilized 75-300mm Canon lenses. I would also say that the 70-300mm lenses aren't worth the additional ...


6

Many differences have been suggested already, many of which I agree with, breifly. One's a gorilla, the other's a big cat. Cats look cool, they can't help it. Gorilla is landscape, cat is portrait. Gorilla is cropped, including missing a hand. Cat is full. I can see [or rather, thankfully, not see] the reasoning behind this - gorilla 'parts'… somewhat ...


25

Short answer because there are many good explanations already: The brightest part of your picture is the background. The brightest part of the second picture is the subject.


10

The second photo is much sharper than the first. This is probably a combination of: A sharper lens. The examples I've seen of the Tamron 70-300mm f/4-5.6 Di LD are not sharp enough to produce the second photo, even when perfect technique is used. Cheap 70-300mm zoom lenses, such as your Tamron, are almost universally softest at 300mm compared to other ...


1

I think one thing that is different is the muted look on the picture of the leopard. Maybe it's intentionally muted in post processing or maybe the scene is just a bit muted there. On the other hand the gorilla shot is colorful and vibrant. Maybe the colorful scen makes the gorilla look less dangerous? I mean lots of colors make me think of children ...


21

The second picture is 'better' mainly because it's a glamorous big cat looking glamorous and dangerous. It's better for the same reason pictures of James Dean are better than pictures of me. Compositionally I like the fact that the leopard picture is portrait rather than landscape (this is mostly personal preference however) and that the whole cat is in ...


1

Results depend on the specific lenses you are using and your expectations. Some people may not care as much about some lens characteristics. So equipment one person considers acceptable may be considered poor by another, and vice versa. Faster lenses are often, but not always, of higher quality than slower lenses because manufacturers tend to put more care ...


1

Any broken bottle of f/4 or higher will be great stopped down to f8. There is certainly a difference when it comes to phenomena like flare, coma, spherical aberration, spherochromatism, low contrast etc which haunt, especially non-aspherical, primes when wide open. They will often be better corrected in eg an f/1.4 50mm at f/2 than a "native" f/2 50mm. Of ...


2

Yes, faster lenses are generally higher quality. There's another aspect too - when autofocusing, the lens is generally opened up to its widest aperture. This narrows the DOF which can affect the accuracy of the focus.


1

Is the workshop/factory way to adjust that actually in how much you pre-loosen the outer helicoid? No. The "correct" way is what you state you are "not talking about", which is to loosen the set screws to align the focusing ring. Is there an official/correct way to adjust the infinity stop back? Realign the helicoid. Before separating parts, you ...


0

This might be an issue with modern focusing screens vs fast lenses. AF SLR cameras tend to use focusing screen materials/textures optimized for brightness and manufacturing, not for accurate representation of images. They might be partially transparent instead of fully diffusing, allowing your eyes to focus THROUGH the screen. They might use light-guide ...


1

Here are some ideas. Just fix the camera in one spot and put the objects on a marked spot on your background. Frame for the biggest one. (the smallest ones can be really tiny on the frame) Use some aid to frame the image, for example, if you are using live view, you could put some Scotch Magic tape (that can be easily removed) on the back as a reference, ...


5

With the adapter it seems your lens is too far from the camera to focus at infinity. The registration distance of the EF mount lens is 44mm. The registration distance of the Praktica B mount is also 44mm. The thickness of your adapter pushes the lens too far away from the camera's imaging sensor. The reason the viewfinder looks better is because the ...


2

Be aware that there is current controversy about identically-looking inexpensive lenses sold under different brands, rumoured to be from the same OEM. For example, there are some brands offering lenses that look like Laowa products; however Laowa claims that they are NOT Laowa OEM products but blatant counterfeits (Laowa announcement https://twitter.com/...


4

The same 85/1.8 lens is sold under different names, including Neewer, Opteka, Bower, Vivitar, Lightdow, and others. You don't state what camera, mount, or purpose you want these lenses for, so they may or may not meet your needs. I have used the Neewer 85/1.8 variant. It is reasonably sharp, but doesn't feel sharp (acutance) when used wide open. Like most ...


3

Pictures on the Nikon ad show it's a Jintu, or at least a Jintu box. Jintu say that's an 8-blade aperture. Picture shows 6. You could get one actually purporting to be a Jintu for the same price… or you could save your money. A very very similar Neewer on eBay is £80 & may even be the same thing in a different box. These things often are. I'd say you ...


1

More worried by the specs: Mount: for CANON DSLR Mount Compatible Brand: For Nikon Otherwise you find a "Neewer 85mm f/1,8" on Amazon at about the same price that looks a lot like it and could come from the same plant. You can check the comments of Amazon purchasers, they likely apply to the eBay cousin Buying on Amazon could be safer (return policy, ...


2

Pentax MZ50 uses so-called "crippled" Pentax KAF2 mount, meaning you could use its lens with any Pentax DSLR ever built. Technically, judging by the camera that lens was being used on, you could probably use whatever Pentax K-mount camera you can find, either digital or analogue, from Russian Zenit 122K, legendary Pentax K1000 and MX, many Ricoh and Chinon ...


0

Googling seems to indikate that your old camera is using pentax k mount. That mount is still used by pentax dslrs. A quick search found in the swedish market found a new pentax k-50 with a kit lens for 5000 SEK (aprox 500€). With this camera the lens will physically fit. What is harder to know is if autofocus will work well. On Canon old sigms lenses are ...


3

According to Camera Wiki, the Pentax MZ-50/ZX-50 uses KAF2 mount lenses. It likely also works with older (manual focus) K-mount lenses, though beware the Ricoh variant, which has a pin that can get stuck on the screw drive of some Pentax bodies. There are significant trade-offs in functionality when using old lenses with digital cameras. With old Pentax-...


2

Normally a large object in front of the lens projects a small image behind it, onto the sensor. When you flip the lens, a "small" object "behind" the lens projects a "large" image in "front" onto the sensor. Basically, the magnification ratio is flipped. (I haven't done the math, so it may not be exactly like that.) The max extension I can get with tubes is ...


1

The reason for inverting the lens --- The typical camera lens is optimized to image a world where objects are spaced at different distances and to project this image on the flat surface of film or digital image sensor. Thus the rear of lens is optimized to work a flat surface. When doing macro work, most times the object being imaged is quite shallow or ...


5

I own a Canon EOS 1100D camera that was released in 2011. What lenses are still compatible with this model? Canon EF lenses: All of them. Every single one made since 1987 when the EF mount was introduced. Canon EF-S lenses: All of them. Every single one made since 2004 when EF-S lenses were introduced along with the EOS 20D. Other lenses made by third ...


4

Consider supporting your local economy by purchasing a lens at a local camera store. Someone should be happy to assist you. Lenses are often organized by mount, so all lenses of interest should be located together. You can try them in store to ensure they work with your camera. When searching online, look for lenses that specifically state they are for Canon ...


0

By looking at the specs the more expensive models are weather sealed at the expense of almost double the weight. They also have more AF points and higher video resolution. In addition to that the a6500 have IBIS which in my oppinion could justify the extra price.


1

The old "one touch" style (rotate to focus, push-pull to zoom) is also proving awkward to handle these days (on modern DSLRs or DSLMs) especially in manual focus use cases, especially with really fast and long zooms. The thing is, manually focusing something like 300mm at f/4, to yield an image that is focused well enough not to look deficient on a 12 or ...


0

You could, potentially, repair it by gluing the pieces back in place. You'd need to use a glue that does NOT out-gas anything as part of the cure process; this to avoid contaminating the lens elements or anything inside the body. That still leaves you with the possibility, as noted by xiota, of the repair not holding and broken pieces in the body - you don'...


0

All lenses have unresolved issues. There are seven major aberrations that the lens maker strives to mitigate. This is accomplished by making the camera lens using several lenses inserted in the lens barrel. The finished product is generally a compromise, optimized for distance and slightly compromised when tasked to work in close. Most top drawer lenses ...


0

There might be practicality: A 24mm equivalent lens can be used to create a reasonably normally looking photo if that is quickly needed, eg in a reportage situation. 24mm is considered the lower end of the "tame" wide angles, and a possible general purpose lens. Not exactly optimal for eg portraiture... but people in 2019 have gotten used to the ...


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