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1

Any time you zoom in image quality will look worse than when you're not zoomed in. It's like holding a magnifying glass up to a postage stamp or a photo printed in a newspaper. What looked like solid lines or areas of solid colors when you viewed them from normal distance and they were unmagnified are shown to actually be a series of very small dots instead. ...


10

What you're looking for is what's called the Droste effect. So-called because Droste cocoa uses that kind of repeating image on its packaging. Mathematically this has been figured out, and there's a lot of pre-existing software out there that can do this, most notably using Gimp with the Mathmap plugin and using the Droste script (part of the default ...


6

In photoshop there is a shortcut for "step and repeat;" basically, you duplicate the layer and transform(scale)/position it once and use the shortcut to repeat that over and over. https://planetphotoshop.com/step-and-repeat-in-photoshop.html Of course, you could also build an infinity mirror and do very little in post. https://youtu.be/sAPGw0SD1DE


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I did something like it in Photoshop. The original was a vase with a hole in the center, shot directly from above. I then copied the vase and shrank it to fit the hole four times. I darkened each successive copy by 1 stop to make it look like they were receding. You could make more copies if you like. If you stack the small ones on the large ones they ...


0

I think you need to stop using the cheap strobes as it seems you're struggling with them. There is no consistency in strobe lighting and will vary from one shot to another. As shooting watches is very demanding, I'd advise changing strobes or getting strong LED lights if you don't have too much money. If you have very little money to spend, I'd advise buying ...


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Purely digital images don't "have" dpi. They are just an array of pixels (dots). DPI1 - dots per inch - specify a way to translate the mathematical abstraction of pixels to a physical size. Only when you deal with physical rendering of the digital image - whether shown on a screen or printed on paper - does dpi become relevant. The intrinsic ...


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If you use Gimp, with the ofn-layer-aligner script: you load both images as layers in the same Gimp image (File > open for the first, File > Open as layers for the others) you set two points on the first (reference) image (typically, the center of the pupils) you set two points on the second (target) image (the pupils again) the script rotates/scales/...


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I fixed it. Adobe told me to clear my cache, which didn't work. I did two things that appeared to work, not sure which one did it. First, I deleted both Photoshop and Bridge, chose the option to not keep any preferences in case their was a hiccup in them, then restarted the pc. Second, under Camera Raw Preferences, DNG File Handling, I selected "Embed ...


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Many thanks, derQuestions and scottb, for this info. Works like a charm. I used this on a Sirui anamorphic image just now, with the following command-line: "C:\Program Files (x86)\exiftoolgui\ExifTool.exe" -DefaultScale="4.0 3.0" -LensInfo="50 50 1.8 16" -LensMake="Sirui" -LensModel="Anamorphic 50mm Anamorphic 1....


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The image size of a video game depends on 2 things. The graphics card. The monitor used to see the image. The monitor can be irrelevant at some point. You can turn it off and still press the "print screen" key to put the image in the clipboard. But you still need to tell the resolution of the game output and the best way to do it is using a ...


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Concerning ownership and usage of the image, that's a question that is better asked of a lawyer in your jurisdiction. The IANAL version is a pretty firm "yes" under (most) western copyright law, but with the caveat that under that law, whether you can display, sell, or otherwise distribute the image falls somewhere between "no" and "...


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