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4

My colloquial explanation. Image One: It is a big blue clear sky. Oh, and the image is big in size. Basically all the image is blue. Image two: It is a green tree, on a field of colored flowers, (here is one, here is another (repeat several times) there is a farm, a house, there are some clouds, there are a pony and a fence, and next to the fence... But ...


21

For these two photos: as shown by ImageMagick's identify, the bird is JPEG quality 100 and the llamas are JPEG quality 92). This alone would be enough to explain the size difference (the other factor, chroma-subsampling, is the same in both pictures). To put things in perspective, a test picture, exported with various quality settings (all other settings, ...


27

The reasons to have difference in size can be (and most of them are related to image compression): Amount of details in the image. Save flat colour image and another with several colours and you will see the difference Number of colours. Related to above, but if you have more colours and lossy compression you may have bigger image (as size) Level of JPEG ...


0

On my phone I use Microsoft Lens. Here are some similar results to Microsoft Lens that are for Windows - https://alternativeto.net/software/office-lens/?platform=windows


1

Though this is little more than my own opinion, I think it's lacking in punch. Even for a low-key image, I'd usually push the whites to white - lift the specular highlights. If you were looking at this scene 'live' the store lighting would be really quite blinding compared to ths darkness your eyes were acclimatised to. It would be pushing that light out ...


4

Your question seems to be more related to image brightness when displayed rather than "exposure." This comes down to having a calibrated monitor and screen brightness appropriate for the ambient levels. A tool I use is a gamma test strip... I have it embedded into the Lightroom interface as the "identity plate." If I can't see the difference between the ...


1

There is a very nice tool to remove JPEG artifacts and get DNG file out of pixels. Sure, it can't reconstruct HDR and other details, but still it may be helpful. The application uses machine learning (convolutional neural networks) to process input image (e.g. remove compression artifacts and slightly remove noise) and don't make it blurry as using just ...


2

I asked the same question almost 2/3 of a century ago and my professor replied --- Motion pictures are projected on a screen using a projector that illuminates the film with a condenser lamphouse. This lamphouse adds one paper grade or more of contrast. Additionally the sharpness demand and the contrast demand for motion picture is reduced as compared to ...


6

In short, everything about color has a psychological meaning or response: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28612080 Oversaturated images tend to grab our attention and there is both a trend for them and backlash as far as art is concerned (Why are vibrant, saturated photos considered 'not as good'?). But, Social Media is not art, it is all ...


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