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1

Sorry, but I would say that rig offers No Hope for Milky Way pictures. Specs say that camera has a 1/3 inch sensor (tiny, like in a iPhone), and it is a 400 mm lens (extreme telephoto for that sensor size). That combination's Field of View (camera alone, no eyepiece) computes as less than one degree size (which is a magnified telescopic view). That ...


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It will be possible for you to capture small areas of the Milky Way with that setup, but the angle of view you can see with that telescope will be much too narrow to be able to see what one usually means when they say "The Milky Way", which can stretch overhead from one horizon to the other at certain times of the year. You need a lens with a much wider ...


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Sch*matics of the A*7 exist online, enough said. Pin 17 is switched from the UNREG_ACC bus via a power MOSFET Q6502 controlled by the IRIS0 pin of the main SOC. UNREG_ACC is switched by another power MOSFET Q6501 controlled by power controller IC6501 straight off the battery. There is an 1.6 amp fuse F0006 protecting that bus. This fuse does not appear to ...


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If it shorts the front contacts, there may be damage. Your camera uses the Sony Multi-Interface Shoe (MIS), which has a whole lot more contacts than the hot shoes found on other brands. One pin in particular brings the full, unregulated battery power, with a 1.6A fuse (Pin 17 in the Wikipedia link above). If this pin is shorted to ground (such as the ...


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Maybe. To be absolutely sure not to damage your camera, you can place a piece of self-adhesive plastic tape over the bottom plate of the accesory shoe to prevent any electrical contact between the metal plate and the camera contacts.


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The hot shoes I am familiar with are designed to accept metal cold shoes. You can tell by looking closely at the shoe on the camera, the contacts will be slightly recessed and only have contact when connecting a device that has contacts meant to push into these recesses. Also, hot shoes should have a protection circuit in them as well. Cameras can get ...


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Is there a reason to go with DSLR instead? There might be a slight one, depending on exactly what type of astrophotography you're planning on doing. The sensor is on and energized the entire time a mirrorless cameras is turned on. This creates heat that can affect the amount of camera generated "read noise." A DSLR's sensor is energized only when actually ...


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DSLR or mirrorless, either works just fine. Mirrorless will eventually displace DSLR, but then again DSLR lenses can be used for mirrorless cameras so you won't lose anything if you buy now the old technology. (Vice versa, mirrorless lenses can't be used on DSLRs.) For astrophotography, the answer is: yes! Yes! If you can afford it, full frame is really ...


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The first camera motorized heads (Excluding videocamera heads) were converted from astro goto mounts. PapyWizard was a good example of automating this. It interfaced via Bluetooth or serial to a slightly modified Merlin/Orion mount. The mount was available with an 1000mm cat for about 150$. https://www.kolor.com/wiki-en/action/view/Using_Papywizard_module ...


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