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Tracking To directly answer your question, you are not doing anything wrong per se and the effect is normal. But ordinarily the telescope is equipped with a motor and tracks the object being imaged to prevent this from happening. The Earth rotates on its axis from West to East at 15.04 arc-seconds per second. If a telescope were mounted such that its axis ...


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Jupiter and all the other celestial bodies are seen to move across the sky from East to West. This apparent motion is due to the rotation of earth about its axis. Our clock time is based on the average time it takes for the sun to compete one apparent trip around the earth = 24 hours. Stated differently, celestial bodies appear to change that position by 360 ...


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If you intention is to stack image why do not take still images and stack them instead of take video, split it on frames and use them. About getting object outside of the frame this is because of Earth movement. You will need special equipment to move the telescope and compensate this movement. You can check this article in Wikipedia about the subject. Doing ...


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If all the stars in the universe were equally bright as viewed from the surface of the Earth, the night sky would be solid white. Pause a moment and let that sink in. There are very few spots in the sky, even when using the narrowest available field of view, that you can point a highly sensitive telescope (such as the Hubble) to that will not reveal a light ...


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I wont be able to provide a complete answer, but I can give you some information that may be helpful. Near the end of the answer, I'll mention how astrophotographers get rid of the noise (or at least... significantly reduce it). Short version: Shoot some calibration frames to compare. These calibration frames will consist of a few "bias" frames ...


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