New answers tagged

1

More likely a problem with the shutter that doesn't completely uncover the sensor. From the look of it the curtain wouldn't remain horizontal and jams. Has the shutter noise changed lately?


1

Well, let me put it this way. Here is a photograph with a small sensor camera (1/2.3"), crop factor 5.6, and an APS-C class sensor (crop factor 1.66, slightly smaller than APS-C) in their maximum zoom position (which the big camera reaches only by using an 1.7× tele converter). The small camera has 3 times the effective focal length (600mm) of the large ...


6

Long before digital, people sought to produce smaller film formats to address manufacturing, usability, and other cost-benefit issues, which are described in other answers. What is now known as "full frame" was once known as "miniature". If not for miniature and sub-miniature formats, we'd have to carry around cameras like this:


1

Separate answer, since it is unrelated to the other: While full frame sensors offer much benefit to the enthusiast, artistic, and professional photographer, they also introduce drawbacks that are in many cases really unwanted by the casual user - and in some cases even by the professional artist or reporter for certain tasks: The maximum depth of field ...


3

Apart from what has already been mentioned, there is a particularly good reason for making smaller sensors for DSLRs; It makes it easier to design cheaper and lighter lenses for the rapidly growing consumer market. But still of a high quality. When you make the sensor smaller, you can also make the mirror smaller, and then you can decrease the distance ...


7

Because you specifically asked about history... I'd suggest: size, weight, & cost. All those considerations were equally true in the pre-digital (ie film) days. A popular film format was the 110 size. See: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/110_film The 110 film was cheaper, the cameras were cheaper, and many of the cameras were a lot smaller and lighter ...


7

Big sensors cost more than small sensors for more-or-less the same reason that big TVs cost more than small TVs. Compare a 30-inch TV and a 60-inch TV (about 75cm and 150cm, if you prefer). Miniaturization is no problem — we could make all of the parts of the 30-inch TV way smaller without running into any difficulty. The 30-inch TV costs less to make than ...


1

Smaller sensors have higher production yields, and the electronics to process are lower cost. Double the sensor, and roughly square the processing power needed. The reality is that DX sensors are often higher resolution and greater dynamic range than films they are replacing.


14

The first mainstream applications for electronic image sensors (be it Image-Orthicons, Vidicons, Plumbicons, or CCDs, or CMOS active pixel sensors, be it analog-electronic or digital workflows) were in video, not in still images. Video followed form factors similar to movie film. In movie film, 35mm (equivalent to full frame still) or even 70mm were ...


47

Making large semiconductor devices with no, or only a very small number, of defects is very hard. Smaller ones are much less demanding to make. In particular the yield – the proportion of the ones you make which are usable – for semiconductors drops as you try and make them larger. If the yield is low, then you have to make a lot of devices for each good ...


1

About Four Thirds system: Before wide screen (16:9) monitors and televisions were popular, 4:3 monitors/televisions as the norm; so I guess it seems normal to have sensors which are compatible. The Micro Four Thirds system has a shorter registration distance (a/k/a flange focal distance), to reduce the weight (and price) for cameras, but uses the same ...


0

In the comments to the accepted answer there is a comment about why not have both internal and external? I have that on my JVC video camera. I like that if I forget my card at home then I can still record. But... Countless times have I "lost" video files only to realize months later that they are saved on the internal memory card. The camera switches ...


0

Also, there is an aspect of data confidentiality here. Once you remove the memory card, the only thing you have to handle as bearing potentially confidential data is that card. This will allow for clean separation of data and camera. Eg you do work for client A, put the card under lock and key, and can take the camera to client B without having to worry any ...


1

Without more information about what specific flash you are using and what settings are selected on the flash, it is hard to narrow down the possibilities of what might be causing your issue. The three most likely scenarios are probably: The flash you are using is not i-TTL compatible and is firing at full power when the camera is set to i-TTL. The settings ...


0

The previously mentioned D3500 Reference Manual is your friend, free at https://downloadcenter.nikonimglib.com/en/products/471/D3500.html Page 67 says "Note that Dynamic-area AF and 3D-tracking AF-area modes are not available when AF-S is selected for focus mode. It seems related.


0

This kind of comment is added as "metadata" in the image file (typically EXIF). Any decent image viewer can display them (look for "metadata" or "EXIF" or"XMP" in the menus. But it is not printed over the visible image. There are ways to extract the comment from the image file and print it over the image.


0

Roger Cicala, founder and all around lens guru at lensrentals.com, probably said it best in his blog entry: There is No Perfect lens Expecting any lens to be perfect, even the one that's supposedly the "best ever made" and according to the marketing materials solves every problem known to man - at least until its replacement is brought out a few years later ...


1

Does the lens make pictures you are pleased with & in particular do you notice the technical problems? If so then perhaps. If not then only if you are worried that this problem might somehow reduce the value of the lens & you plan to sell it at some point. A lens is just part of a machine for making pictures: if the pictures are fine the lens is ...


1

Another solution is to use a SD card with built-in Wifi (works in about any camera that takes SD cards). Some can upload images to the cloud. See here for some options.


0

The canon WFT-4E accessory for the 5D mark ii can do that. I just tested it with my camera and the camera connected to my home wifi and a few seconds later I could view the image I took on my computer where I hosted the ftp server.


3

Pretty much all of the 1-series have an ethernet port that allows FTP over ethernet. The two most recent models are the EOS 1D X Mark II and the EOS 1D X. But that requires a wired connection to a network host. There are plenty of recent Canon models in several classes and price ranges that have WiFi capability. Some require an external WiFi adapter. Others ...


1

Artifacts such as a moiré (more-ay) are repeating maze-like patterns, with or without color. Artifacts are a fact of life because the digital camera uses an array of primary colors to fracture the projected image from the lens into three juxtaposed images. This technique allows color photography by recording three images simultaneously. Image inaccuracy ...


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