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2

Either a stuck mirror or a stuck shutter. Remove the lens and use the camera menus to navigate to the setup for manual sensor cleanup, which should lift up the mirror fully and open the shutter fully. You'll quickly sees which one is stuck (unless that maneuver fixes something...). In any case the camera likely requires service.


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Which camera are you using? If it's an DSLR (i.e. not a "mirrorless camera"), then the picture you see through the viewfinder is not affected by the shutter speed or aperture settings (unless a preview mode is enabled) and will appear as bright as the ambient light. On the other hand, the live view and video are affected at least by the aperture setting (...


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It feels awkward for spending so much R&D for a sensor technology and then abandon it. Do you see it awkward to spend much R&D on film and then abandon it? You know, Kodak built the first ever digital camera and then abandoned it. That was very awkward, far more awkward than what Nikon did, as we all know the digital camera later reappeared and ...


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Note: from Wikipedia: The Canon EOS 2000D, known as the Rebel T7 in the Americas, as the Kiss X90 in Japan and as the 1500D in southeast Asia. No, you can't. At least, not according to the How to Send Your Canon EOS Rebel T7/2000D’s Pictures to the Computer article related to the Canon EOS Rebel T7/2000D For Dummies book: Your Canon EOS Rebel T7/2000D ...


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English language is particularly confusing regarding optical assemblies, especially in the context of photography... "Lens" indeed refers to the whole group of lenses (interchangeable or not) attached to the camera ... in microscopy and astronomy, this would be more formally called an "objective" (describing the sum of glass parts that AREN'T part of the ...


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A count of just 15 seems unlikely on a used camera! No, it won't turn off at some predetermined number. It's just, like an odometer on a car, an indicator of how much it's been used. Interesting when determining the resale price perhaps. But no, shutter replacement if it DOES fail is not a DIY job, and is very likely not economic.


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