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Nothing to do with physics. It is just a warning that the pixel count behaves like an area and not like a length. Some people expect a 50Mpx camera to have 4× the definition of a 12.5Mpx one when it is only 2×. The pixel count grows like the square of the definition (so it grows faster, which is goodness for marketing purposes) and conversely the definition ...


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The SNR begins with/originates from the scene generating it... if there is nothing in the camera's signal chain that reduces that SNR, then all sensors receive the same SNR when used with the same lens and w/ the same Ap/SS settings. The reduced pixel level SNR associated with a higher resolution sensor is simply because the light/scene generated SNR is ...


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It depends. Assuming both sensors have the same linear dimensions: If you are viewing the images from both sensors at the same display size, then the low light performance of both will be similar, assuming they use the same generation of technology. There are other advantages unrelated to low light S/N performance that make using a higher resolution sensor ...


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Sensors have antialiasing filters that block higher frequency image content in order to avoid Moiré patterns. Averaging pixels will also average (and thus reduce) noise but is comparatively bad as a low-pass filter and thus will not work as well for suppressing Moiré patterns as an optical antialiasing filter made to size would. While you can try using ...


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Now your metering is normal. You say you used to take good pictures in an Indoor office at 1/125, F5.6 and ISO100 that is certainly not right... impossible in fact if your office isn’t a solarium or a special light testing lab... that environment is about 7-8 ev for iso 100 that would be something more like f2.8 1/15 indoors EV With the settings you used you ...


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No. Cleanliness is next to godliness, and godliness is next to good autofocus. Having a clean sensor will not be a detriment to autofocus algorithms.


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On most DSLRs, focusing is done through a dedicated phase detect sensor which is separate from image sensor. As a result, autofocus is not impacted by anything you to do the imaging sensor. This image (source) shows the various parts of a DSLR: #2 and #3 are the parts of the mirror mechanism which fold away when creating the image. The light that enters the ...


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Loss of resolution: Physically, a factor of 4 is lost on the resolution because 4 pixels are needed to fully represent the color of a certain point. In practice the loss of resolution is negligible. This is because color filter arrays have twice as many green fields as blue or red and the eyes more sensitive to green, especially when it comes to resolution ...


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