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Don't do this. As already stated, you get about a crop factor of 7 on the lens. That means that the lens provides about 50 times the image area than your sensor actually utilised. The typical smartphone camera these days has more than 20MP so your DSLR lens has to produce an image with a resolution corresponding to about a 1000MP full-frame camera even ...


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Theoretically, you would get a 7x more zoomed image, But lenses have a limited resolution and the resolution of a given generation of DSLR lenses more or less matches the resolution of the same generation of DSLR sensors. And being 7x denser your iPhone sensor would require lenses with 7x more resolution. So in practice, for the same final quality, and with ...


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The new imagined lens would appear zoomed (with say a 28 mm lens instead of 4 mm, which would be around 7x zoom, which is a real actual zoom by the longer lens). And it will be a lot of pixels, but it will still be a very small "cropped" image of tiny area, with crop factor of about 6x. So it would have to be greatly enlarged about 6x more just to ...


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The iPhones have sensors with about a 6 mm diagonal(depending on the model). A typical full frame camera has a diagonal of about 43 mm, so the crop factor is about 7. That means that the lens acts like a lens of 7 times the focal length in terms of field of view. A standard 50mm DSLR lens becomes a 350mm lens in terms of field of view. It is like you ...


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As explained in DPreview forums, which refers to an interview with Lau Norgaard, VP of R&D at camera manufacturer Phase One, in particular at 6:30, manufacturer's have weakened CFAs in modern cameras to achieve higher ISO at the expense of color fidelity. Colors today are less pure. So the difference between CMOS and CCD does not depend on the sensor ...


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It was an economic decision and not based on quality. Traditional media spent a fortune on processing, splicing, etc. Digital removed 75% of the cost. 35mm film quality was much higher than digital during the transition. MF was obviously even better but even more expensive. News and magazine image quality is quite low but I do remember a SI swimsuit ...


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No, your camera is fine. You would need to do a long exposure for it to overload the receptors. You are right though. Avoid pointing directly into the sun. It will damage your camera much faster than a light bulb. If you do damage your receptors you will know it.


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The immediate consequence of overheating is an increased noisiness in the analog circuitry and possibly failures in the digital circuitry. There is no immediate damage to be expected before the camera becomes non-functional. However, the longterm consequences are vastly accelerated aging of the sensor, leading to hot pixels, loss of sensitivity, worse ...


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