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From your description, it seems to me that it is the browsers that are wrong, and the picture vieweres that are right. Which is, in a way, to be expected. First, even if you are using Firefox 77 which is supposed to have fixed the issue, still check the gfx.color_management.mode setting: it should be 1. If you updated it from a previous version, it may have ...


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I'm not sure about the scale difference. I've never tried that. But Photoshop's PhotoMerge feature, which is used to create panoramic images from multiple smaller images is designed to do the rest of what you want to do. If it can handle the different scale, all you would need to do is load the two images, then call up the function from File>Automation>...


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I want them to be roughly the defaults that "everyone else" will be using. Most people do not have functional color management. They generally won't care whether images look the same on their computers as on yours. The "best" solution is to fix color management settings in all programs, including web browsers. Then export to or work in sRGB. Images will ...


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As already established, export as sRGB - whether or not you embed the profile is really moot, as with no profile, sRGB will be assumed. Prior to that work in whatever you got from your camera*. Only convert once at export. The major error, however, is to use Proof Colours with your Monitor profile. This will apply a double translation & generally look ...


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Everything Nir and Digital Lightcraft said, but I thought I'd add a [very lazy] example. The thing a seasoned photographer would spot first is the direction of the light which is the trickiest to fix, but from your first result, just by playing with white balance, channels, brightness/contrast/gamma,a fairly heavy-handed sharpen - all across the whole ...


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The degeneration one would have to open and resave the file 10,000 times. Your not going to lose any image quality the few hundred times you open and close the file, and or, edit the file. I use photofiltre and can save at 100% file. Anyways, if you're that worried about it, always edit with the image converted to tiff and or a 2nd copy jpg of the original ...


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In Adobe Photoshop, you can use this plugin from Exchange: https://exchange.adobe.com/creativecloud.details.103952.portraitcrop-automated-crop-with-face-detection.html or: https://rezzomedia.com/portraitCrop


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Those images have one thing in common. That is the warm color tone and also the neutral whites. Take a look at this image: Instagram Did you ever see a gray sky like this? To achieve this look I would go to the HSL section in the develop tab in lightroom and set the saturation of cooler colors to a small value. I would not set them to 0 because then you ...


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The comments to the question are well-founded, so what follows is only a hypothesis. It may have been done in the following manner: On location : Use of standard parameters, in particular concerning the color balance, or better, but more complex, systematic calibration of the balance on a reference test pattern (medium grey card). Under Lightroom (or ...


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File copy is a lossless operation. Disks usually hace CRC checks in place to detect if a sector is corrupted but the act of copying is a 1:1 bit copy, so each copy is exactly identical to the previous. The loss of quality occurs on compression when a file is written from image-data, JPEG encoding discards some information, and even so JPEG supports certain ...


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DPI is only meaningful for print or a physical display. If you are still seeing and printing the image at the same size, then nothing changes. Now, if you change the DPI and render the image at that DPI, the image will become smaller. This will make the image look sharper just because details are smaller.


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It doesn't. Well, let's say, it doesn't if you only change the dpi without re-rendering the image. DPI is not very meaningful for image-files, at least until you print them. So unless you change the pixel dimensions of an image, changing the DPI will do nothing in Photoshop other than attaching this value to the image. You can test this by disabling ...


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I can think of 2 things, going wrong. First check the hardware acceleration. There might be trouble with that. You find it in the preferences under Performance in the upper right section. If that is selected, turn it off for a try. That might already solve the problem. If yes, you might need to check, if you installed new graphics drivers before the ...


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As others have said, the areas in question have lost most of their data, so there is no way to recovery what has been lost. The only way to repair the image at this stage is to recreate the data either from the start (i.e. take the photo again), or approximate what should be their using the surrounding data as a reference. The former is not possible in ...


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Clone stamp tool With enough patience and Photoshop skills, it should be possible to "recover" blown highlights by simply cloning a similar texture from another part of the picture, which is correctly exposed. I'm a mediocre Photoshopper, and here's what I achieved in 5 minutes with the Clone Stamp Tool. Please don't laugh too hard at the bra or hair: ...


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I agree with Tetsujin. The highlights in the image you posted are blown out to pure white. Since you do not have the raw file, there is no information to recover. It is possible to use collage and cloning techniques to fill in the missing detail, but it would be time consuming and likely not worthwhile, especially if you can retake the image. You can avoid ...


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If you don't have the raw file, this is not going to be possible. From comments - it's not so much that having the RAW would guarantee rescue, rather that having only a tiny jpg gives you zero chance. BTW, this image is littered round the interweb, no clear source. The stripes are pretty much data-less, all within a point or two of being literally pure ...


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