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The basic idea is to posterize the image. Here is a rough first approach. Edit the curves "freehand" But as we do not want too much banding on the colors, let's turn it into a grayscale image first and then edit the curves. We could now convert the image to palette color mode (3 colors) and edit them. But the real additional step is to vectorize the ...


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This kind of color reduction became popular with the "Obama hope" poster, and looking for plugins under than name yields results. Another method is to "posterize" the image to reduce the number of colors (and hope for the best) or sample a few dominant colors into a palette and then convert the image to use the palette. OTOH, you can't take any random ...


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It wouldn't surprise me if there are plugins for Photoshop/Gimp/whatever that can approximate that by combining regions of colors that are "close enough" into geometric shapes of a single color, and then somehow doing some cleanup on the edges that make up the shapes. But I highly suspect the samples you show were actually drawn by an artist, not converted ...


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View this Leica blog and look at his negatives. He used a lot of TriX 400. The idea is exposing for the right things. He exposes so that the shadows are all dark. You can certainly bring the highlights up in post processing, but look for high contrast light - noon light and shadows. https://www.leica-camera.blog/2015/08/12/renato-dagostin-coast-to-coast-...


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Another option is to shoot through colored filters. Back in my "I'm going to be a real photographer!" phase (before I realized I had absolutely no talent for it), I shot a lot of B&W through various filters to enhance or reduce contrast. Red filters darken blues (making white clouds stand out against a blue sky), green filters darken oranges (bringing ...


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With selective grade contrast papers and a variety of film processes you can achieve these results. I don't know if there's negative combinations or pre-flashing of the paper, but all of these are easily achieved in the darkroom after a couple of weeks of practice. I hate to say it but these appear to be pretty simple- so the fact that they're interesting ...


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Upon viewing his portfolio at the link you provided, my first thought was push processing. In push processing, one typically underexposes the shot (that is, meters and set exposure as if the the film were a higher ISO than it really is), then compensate in the darkroom by overdeveloping the film to account for the underexposed shot. Push processing tends to ...


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Finally, after a lot of tests and search I found a solution: Reset the Brush tool!


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For better image processing please read the blog https://www.offshoreclippingpath.com/image-processing-tutorial/


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SOLVED! I found Bruno Postle's solution (https://groups.google.com/forum/#!searchin/hugin-ptx/nona-deshake%7Csort:date/hugin-ptx/yFE6VF-mtGk/U8OYAuNYCgAJ) and implemented it on Windows. https://sites.google.com/site/alistargazing/home/image-processing/time-lapse-deshake. Takes 4 sec per image on an old laptop, and less than 5 minutes to launch a new project ...


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I always do the color grading stuff before, because if done after retouching it can make the editing more visible. The edited parts are always a bit different from their surroundings and will react differently to the color tools.


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You should avoid having photoshop do anything automatically if you can. As long as you have a good monitor and good eyes, everything you do by eye will be far better than what software can do. Turn off all image correction in your camera and do levels, contrast, and saturation by eye. Use the fewest pics you can use to make it look good as far as ...


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The banding is caused by differences in exposure across frames. You have several options to address the problem. Use the same exposure settings for every image. Manually set aperture, ISO, and shutter speed. If there is a huge variation of brightness levels across the scene, you can take bracketed exposures and process as HDR prior to stitching, as long ...


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