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A few things you can try. Make sure the lens is fully seated and when you rotate it you hear the lens release button click (page 27 in your manual). If you can remove your lens without pressing the lens release button, your lens isn't mounted properly. Check the focus mode switches on the body and lens (you indicate you have done this). You may want to ...


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Diffraction and maximum resolution are just opposite sides of the same factor, aperture size. For a given aperture restriction, the size of the airy disks will be the same regardless of all other factors. However, DoF in relation to diffraction/resolution is more of a trade... When you increase the DoF by using a smaller aperture you are trading resolution ...


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This is only possible by a system that corrects for the effects of diffraction in post-processing. For example Canon's Digital Lens Optimizer can somewhat negate the effects of diffraction. I'm not sure if similar features are available for Nikon. The problem here is that by fixing the sensor size to full frame (36mm x 24mm) and by fixing the resolution to ...


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You have to tell if it's motion blur or focus blur. Since at 1/1600 on people I doubt it's motion blur I'll assume it's focus blur. I see three factors that could cause this: Wide aperture on long focal length: this reduces the depth of field, if you use a smaller aperture (bigger number...) you increase the chances that your subject is actually in the ...


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Is VR (Vibration Reduction) turned on (switch on the side of the lens)? Amazingly, VR works at 1/8 sec. shutter speeds as the following hand-held while standing photos attest to. This was taken using a Nikon 200-500mm lens, weighing in at 5 pounds. Settings: 200mm focal length, 1/8 sec. shutter speed, f/13, ISO 400, APS-C body (similar to your camera). ...


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If you want sharp pictures use a tripod. If a tripod is bothersome, you don’t want sharp pictures very much. There’s nothing wrong with that. Sharp pictures are overrated.


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With a kit lens, you're definitely limited by max. aperture. It's why lenses with smaller than f/2.8 max. aperture are typically dubbed as "slow" lenses: you need slower shutter speeds to get good exposures with them. If you're shooting something that's not moving, then using a tripod or other form of stabilization (monopod, bean bag, IBIS, or lens ...


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