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3

You can't "fix" distance haze. You can try compensate for it, but you cannot fix it. None of what follows is in any way definitive, it's 5 mins in Photoshop & really rough The method I would have used for your posted image would be HDR - 3 exposures, merge afterwards - but we're too late for that. So we're left with 'fudging'. If you mask out the '...


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With the new version of Lightroom Classic you can automate some of the tasks. You need to stack the images for each HDR and then run the process for all of them. You can check here for more information.


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These samples simply look washed out from flare to my eyes. The lens was sharp but the sun is fogging the image. If you wanted to replicate flare, I believe Tiffen DFX 4 has that option and Color Efex Pro 4 has that option.


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I use the graduated nd filter in the Color Efex pro 4.0 plugin. It is easy to adjust. When you save the image, the setting will be retained in lightroom or PS's filter memory until you change it again. So, just apply it to every frame.


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To combine smooth and sharp in Lightroom I would use a reduced clarity setting (midtone contrast) combined with higher sharpening settings (edge contrast). It may be more beneficial to apply them selectively with the adjustment brush rather than the global sliders.


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Yes, sort of. You can apply multiple profiles/LUT's to the same image, but not a single image. You would need to export the image in a non-raw format (tiff/psd/jpeg) and import that image into LR (sync the folder). You can then apply another profile/LUT to the image. Not presently.


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Lightroom is a tool for graphical interaction with images rather than batch processing. For your use case Imagemagick looks better suited. There is also a tutorial for this: http://www.imagemagick.org/Usage/compose/#divide


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NIK Viveza allows you to recolor any part of the image desired. Works as a plugin for Lightroom and for Photoshop.


3

Here are some causes for non-zero values that you expect to be zero. The most relevant to your problem are listed first. Your synthetic raw does not account for the input color profile of the camera, which is based on how the specific colors filter in the Bayer matrix interact with lighting sources when photographing calibration targets (with a lens, which ...


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I get reasonably good results photographing negatives with a slide copier attachment and a macro lens (vs using a flatbed scanner). However, if you plan to scan many frames of film, you should consider a dedicated film scanner with batch feeder. Depending on your lens and camera, image quality from a film scanner may or may not be better, but it would be ...


2

That's an obvious tell-tale signature artifact of a specific form of sharpening: spread point function deconvolution. At some point, I'm not sure when but at least a few years back, Adobe started changing their default sharpen algorithms from the traditional unsharp mask across their entire product line, to what appears to be said deconvolution kernel. One ...


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That effect is normally a result of a high level of noise reduction combined with higher detail preservation/contrast settings. It can also be exacerbated by basic edits that make the image noise more pronounced (increased contrast/clarity/etc). You can set luminance and color noise reduction levels to zero to remove the effect and then refine the settings. ...


-1

It's a 1:1 preview of a small portion of the image. I don't know that you can get rid of it, but you can select a different area so it looks different. Or just hide the Detail panel by clicking on the arrow next to the word "Detail" to collapse it. EDIT: In light of the further comment... The purpose of the preview is so that you can observe the effects of ...


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No the Lightroom has different behaviour at any installation. I have installed at 4 pc's in my office. The same version, same photo and none of them has the same exposure in "auto tune" Even when i install a different version at the same pc, the same photo has different exposure and brightness.


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For Adobe Lightroom to combine a single image jpeg and raw files, the names have to be the same. Usually that is the case out of the camera. In my case, I had imported these files awhile ago, and the jpeg and raw file of the same image had different names. So I simply renamed all of images, jpeg and raw, using YearMonthDayHourMinuteSecond naming scheme. ...


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You can filter on the ones that have not been edited "Unedited photos only". If you want finer granularity (i.e., between edited but not final vs. final), you'll have to do that manually by designating some other property to signify "final" (e.g., a keyword "final", or specific color tag, or even a flagged status -- whatever you're not using for something ...


2

I usually use color labels for that. There are shortcuts for that when you have only one photo selected: You can add a red label by pressing 6, a yellow label by pressing 7, a green label by pressing 8, and a blue label by pressing 9. If you need to apply a color label to multiple photos, select them all then right-click, choose Set color label and the ...


0

What your asking for you can do now directly in photoshop. The raw converter will let you apply a range of tools, lens correction, white balance, exposure control and then you can bulk save as jpeg, photoshop, tiff or other, including resizing if you want. When your done you can then delete the folder of RAW images.


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No. Only the settings specified in the preset are changed to the preset's values. The rest (if any) are not changed.


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