New answers tagged

1

The safest route seems to be to adjust Lightroom's "Local Storage" down to a minimal size. After syncing and a restart, the file is purged down to the size you specify.


1

Any time you zoom in image quality will look worse than when you're not zoomed in. It's like holding a magnifying glass up to a postage stamp or a photo printed in a newspaper. What looked like solid lines or areas of solid colors when you viewed them from normal distance and they were unmagnified are shown to actually be a series of very small dots instead. ...


1

My guess is the problem was operator error at the print shop. Specifically, the operator was right clicking on a thumbnail and downloading that instead of the linked image. It probably started working automatically when a different person at the print shop downloaded the image. My working premise is that print shops often use less experienced operators for ...


0

The distribution of dynamic range appears to be different between the pictures. One picture, provides more stops of dynamic range above the midpoint. The other picture more stops below the midpoint. For example if each picture expresses twelve stops of dynamic range, one picture might distribute four stops below the midpoint and seven stops above the ...


0

First, I'd see if they accept something other than JPG, like a PSD or DNG. Second, when you export a JPG file from Lightroom, make sure you're exporting to Hard Drive. Make sure your compression at is the smallest level (Quality the highest number) that gives you a file size they will accept. Make sure that 'Limit File Size" is unchecked. Make sure that ...


1

There are probably several things going on here all at once that can each contribute to the variability you have noticed. Aperture positions are not exact from one frame to the next, particularly with cameras that use mechanical linkages between the camera body and the lens to set the position of the aperture diaphragm, such as the vast majority of Nikon F-...


3

The cameras produce different results because you're using the same raw processing settings for cameras that have different sensors and processing pipelines. You need to tweak the settings to match the camera. To improve highlight detail: Don't increase the exposure setting so much. Increase shadow and highlight recovery. This should work if the detail ...


0

An update from "recently" (not sure which version exactly, but some version newer than what was available when the question was asked): If you can stack the bracketed shots into groups, e.g. using the "Auto-Stack by Capture Time" function, batch processing is possible in Lightroom Classic. Simply selecting all stacks for which the HDR ...


0

Adjust your camera settings to match processing you like. Remember, you are never seeing a RAW file but an image rendered from one. So any distinction in resolution is a difference in processing. Be sure to select the highest resolution and quality level and adjust the level of sharpness in the selected Picture Style. Resolution should match exactly what ...


-1

Same problem here. Easily overcome by going to 'Image size' and changing it back to 300DPI. I found mine changed, strangely, to 72DPI whilst editing.


Top 50 recent answers are included