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2

Summary Adobe ACE wins hands down. It produced no differences when converting all 16M (256^3) RGB colors from sRGB to ProPhoto RGB and back to sRGB when working with 16 bit tiffs and rounding to 8 bits per channel. Microsoft, however, converted sRGB(0,54,0) to (32, 54, 14). Out of 16+ million colors this was the worst. And very visible. The Delta E between ...


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According to ICC color correction in Firefox, Firefox has been capable of reading colour profiles in images since Firefox version 3 (released 17 June, 2008). This was configurable, and initially defaulted to 'off', but this default behaviour was changed to 'on' in Firefox 3.5 (released 30 June, 2009). However, this comes with a big caveat. It seems ICC ...


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A bit of Googling finds that colour management is switched off by default in Firefox [I'm not even going to comment on what I think of that idea;) To enable it... type about:config in the address bar & hit Enter. It warns you you're going into some 'advanced' mode, accept. Type gfx in the search bar that appears. Scroll down until you find gfx....


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on PS (with "convert to profile..." and "assign profile") that doesn't work and actually looks the same on PS and of course renders different on the browser. And with the same resultant image I tried to convert it back to proPhoto Actually, convert to profile is working correctly. It should look the same in a program that recognizes and ...


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Just because Photoshop uses the ProPhoto color space internally, it doesn't mean what you see on your screen is rendered using ProPhoto color space. It's almost certainly being converted to sRGB when sent to your screen. So what you see on your screen when working in the ProPhoto color space is the results of your processing instructions applied in ProPhoto ...


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I think there's a broad misconception here, but I'm not sure where to start to 'fix' that, so here are some rambling thoughts so far… Bullet points in the question have been edited since I answered this, so my numbers no longer match the question. The broad scope is still the same. I tested the images from the linked website in four browsers, Left to right ...


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I fear there is a misunderstanding of the processes involved: color correction vs color conversion vs "applying/assigning an ICC". (The latter are usually understood as two different things; to avoid ambiguity, it's better to say about assigning a profile). As others have mentioned, you can't really avoid color conversion when processing raw images....


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As already mentioned, you never use your screen profile like that in Photoshop. Photoshop & your OS handle this part as an on-the-fly-output to the screen, not as part of your colour workflow. Try this [I don't use windows so I'm not certain how it's applied to the desktop] Run DisplayCal, at the end of the process it should ask if you want that set to ...


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What Michael said... A monitor profile is ONLY suitable for your operating system to operate your monitor. It is not a color profile of any normal standard that any other system would understand. Because the profile is on your computer, and because PS is a fully color managed program, PS can display the image correctly even though the profile is being used ...


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You should never use a monitor profile as your "working space" color profile. They're two different types of profile that should be applied at two different steps in the processing pipeline between the image file and your monitor. If you apply a monitor profile as your "working space" color profile and then it is applied again when sent ...


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A raw file without a color/demosaicing profile applied cannot be displayed. At a minimum this will be the camera profile (LR's profiles, RawDigger's built in profiles, etc). And the color space (icc profile) will be whatever is being used by the program (ProPhoto for LR). At this point both profiles are only applied and the raw data remains unchanged, but ...


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ICC profiles describe hardware. Specifically, how hardware interprets color data relative to a reference standard produced by the International Color Consortium (the ICC). So an ICC color profile for a camera describes how to interpret the color data the camera produces. An ICC profile for a monitor describes how it should interpret the color data it ...


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