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After some clarification on existing answers, if the intention is to increase contrast, then leave the small sub-highlights in those areas [sparkles, for want of a better word] less visible, then you could try brushing over with the burn tool This is very rough & I've only done the tree & bottom right corner. First, I punched up the contrast [...


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I'll interpret your question in the opposite way everyone else has. You seem to me to be asking how to prevent the details becoming visible again. Once you have darkened your image, increase the black point. This will make the new shadows actually black, and prevent the details from being recovered. You can do this in levels in most editors, or with curves: ...


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A well know technique is called "luminosity masks". You create a selection mask where the pixels selection level is: 100% or near 100% in the luminosity range that you want to change, 0% or very low in the luminosity range you don't want to change, intermediate for pixels between these two ranges This done by: making a grayscale copy of your image ...


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If I understand your question correctly, you are looking for more control over the lightness and darkness over specific parts of an image - more than what the Levels tool gives you. If so, then with Photoshop you have lots of options. I'll cover a few going from "blunt instrument" approach through to "potentially hours of work". Most general purpose image ...


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If there were an easy solution to this, Camera manufacturers would have built it in-camera (and cashed out) long ago :) Here's the problem. The best modern cameras are sensitive to at most ~15 stops of dynamic range, whereas estimates have put the dynamic range of the human eye at around 20 stops (see this post, for example). In short, your camera can't ...


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