Hot answers tagged

46

Because there is a lot happening in a short timeframe (movement phases of a fast animal or athlete), and you want to photograph it all and/or the exact timing of the relevant event cannot be predicted, so covering as many possible times where that event could happen (and discarding the rest later) is necessary and/or redundant pictures are needed ...


37

Strictly speaking, one does not need high FPS burst modes for sports or wildlife, but rather they are useful tools that open up more options. I've shot sports in the last few years with a Canon 7D, typically using 5-8 frame bursts (at I think 8fps) at a time, and I've also used a medium format manual focus camera. Both methods have produced great images, ...


23

A few things you can do to improve your results. Use ISO 5000 or 6400. The way Canon DSLRs handle the ISO settings between the full-stop settings (100, 200, 400, 800, etc.) means ISO 5000 is cleaner than ISO 4000 and even ISO 2000 on most Canon cameras. The +1/3 stop settings (ISO 125, 250, 500, 1000, 2000, 4000, etc.) should be avoided if noise is a ...


19

If the choice is between a 70-200mm f/4 with IS and a 70-200mm f/2.8 without IS, you're far better off with the f/2.8 lens and the 'faster' shutter speed that allows when shooting most sports. For high school football, IS is not that useful. In order to prevent motion blur due to athlete's movements, you're going to need to use shutter times shorter than ...


15

In addition to all the correct answers about how fast action occurs, I'd like to point out two fundamental biological reasons for why you need burst: 100ms. This is the fastest we can react to a stimulus. Olympic sprinters start to contract their muscles 100ms after the starter's gun goes off. Any event which occurs faster than this cannot be captured by ...


12

In general they like to use the fastest they can get away with. Just how fast that can be is subject to a number of variables. What focal length? How far is the shooting position from the participants? Does the photographer want to 'freeze' everything in the scene or leave some parts that move faster than others blurry to imply motion? How much light is ...


12

Sports photography usually require two things: a long focal length and a wide aperture. The long lens is required to shoot action a long way away. The wide aperture is used for two purposes: Letting in enough light (it won't always be bright sunshine; weather, being indoors and daylight will affect the amount of natural light available to you) so you can ...


12

Selecting an appropriate aperture When shooting sports in low light you're not going to be able to shoot at f/11. Most of us use f/2.8 lenses and shoot wide open. We do this not only because it helps isolate our subject(s) from backgrounds that are often cluttered but also because we need the "speed" of the wide aperture to allow a fast enough shutter speed....


12

John Cheng here. Just found this so here it goes: This illustration was shot with Nikon D5. I was position probably 30 degrees off to the side of the vault, pre-focused on the vault table with a 24-70 and just let her ripped before Simone hit the board. I don't exactly remember how many frames were used but I cut out each Simone and kept the vault table ...


10

Most probably, this is due to the lighting and its continuous pulses. The Digital Picture has an excellent article called "Flickering Lights (Why are some of my pictures dark?)" that states: The problem images [...] have usually been captured under fluorescent or gym/arena lighting and a short exposure was often used. Shooting action sports with a fast ...


8

Based on several friends' experience with both the Sigma 50-500mm and the older, pre-Global Lens Series Sigma 150-500mm (The Sigma Global Lens moniker includes the Contemporary, Art, and Sports series), I wouldn't recommend either. Once you move past 250mm or so they get softer and softer as the focal length increases. Most reviews and test charts I've seen ...


8

The best way to shoot indoors sports in most fairly evenly lit gyms/rinks/arenas is to set exposure manually. It gives you the most complete control over shutter times, aperture, and ISO. Keep in mind that manual exposure will be more accurate than automatic metering under flickering lights such as those found in most indoor sports arenas and outdoor ...


7

In post processing there is a way to try. Whether the result is less obstructive or not depends on your personal viewpoint, patience, skill and luck. What you do is get an image processing application that can take a fourier transform of an image. I use GIMP with a plugin called G'MIC (which has a huge number of functions and is a must for GIMP users IMO)....


6

I would first consider what focal lengths are needed. I am not a sports photographer but I have been able to shoot some middle and high school basketball where I could stand right at the sideline and often found my lenses to be too long. On an APS-sized sensor camera (likely like the entry-level Canon DSLR she's using) I found a 50mm lens to be an acceptable ...


6

There are three basic issues that can make sports pictures blurry: Subject motion too fast for the selected shutter speed. Missed focus Too much camera movement for the selected shutter speed. The camera's "Sports" setting can only do so much to help you. The amount of light available and the lens you are using don't give it as much to work with as what it ...


6

The most obvious thing is that you chose to use f/11 for your photos. At least according to the EXIF data on this image, your lens had a maximum aperture value of f/5.1 at this focal length. By using that kind of aperture, you get two stops worth of exposure and therefore you could drop your ISO by two stops. You say in a comment that you wanted more depth ...


6

Any suggestions of how to fix this? Replace the lighting with a type that does not flicker at the rate of the cycle of the alternating current powering the lights. Use shutter times longer than one-half full cycle of the flickering lights. For countries where alternating current is 50Hz, that would be 1/100 second. For countries with 60Hz AC, that would be ...


6

It's better than the attempt I made in 2004 at the Olympics in Athens to do something similar. I took multiple, normally-exposed photos, and digitally stitched them together later.


6

Shooting indoor volleyball is one of the most difficult assignments even an experienced sports photographer can draw. I know plenty of folks who get paid to shoot sports as part of their jobs as photojournalists. They do very good work shooting basketball, football (outdoors, but still under lights), baseball (even night games), tennis, etc., but many of ...


5

Like most things it depends. Do you shoot under lights at night? If so the 5dm3, is going to perform better (autofocus and cleaner high ISO), otherwise the 7d will perform wonderfully and provide greater reach. As for FPS, in my experience as I get better at shooting most sports this matters less, as I am able to time the shots, rather than gunning through ...


5

I'd say "no, it's not good enough", but it's hard to rule it out absolutely without knowing more details about you're going to try using it. To take each of your three use cases: Wildlife: probably not enough reach. You're looking at 400mm or more for typical wildlife photography. Football: If you can get somewhere near the sidelines, 200mm probably gives ...


5

I'm going to disagree with Jasmine here: this is the wrong lens for your camera. The 18-140 is a perfectly good beginner lens - but you haven't bought a beginner's camera, you've bought something designed for more experienced users. By using a lens designed for the lower end of Nikon's range (a "DX" lens like the 18-140), you are literally throwing away ...


5

In addition to Kevin's answer -- fast shutter speed, experiment with AF modes -- here are three more tips that will help you reach success: Use manual focus. The fastest autofocus systems are too slow for some uses or are fooled too easily for some uses. But manual focus lets you avoid those troubles! Prefocus where you know the motorcycle will be and as it ...


5

This isn't really "a" photograph. It's what's known in the photojournalism world as a "photo illustration" that allows the photographer more leeway in producing an image. Not only have multiple frames been combined to show the various positions of the athlete as she performed a vault, but it looks like a lot of tone mapping and detail enhancement has been ...


5

You need to capture the "decisive moment" with regard to facial expressions and body posture in the instant that reflects both the accomplishment achieved and the toll that achievement took on the one who achieved it. To borrow another phrase, you need to preserve instants that show the "thrill of victory and the agony of defeat." Sometimes the best "finish ...


5

When you're using the lens at the widest aperture and the photo is still too dark at the longest acceptable shutter time, then the only exposure parameter you have left with that lens is to raise the ISO. Then shoot raw and deal with the noise in post processing.¹ Ultimately, to get better image quality in dim light when you can not increase the exposure ...


4

At the time I'm writing this, I have completed 40 marathons, 36 half marathons and many other races. Recently, I volunteered as a photographer at a small marathon. Based on this, I would start by asking a few questions: What is the purpose of your photos? Do you want to show the general event, photograph a few friends, or get individual pictures of nearly ...


4

Unless you're going to be panning you want a fast shutter speed (for football and soccer I have heard around 1/2000 of a second) so that the person you're shooting is crisp (IS/VR/etc will not help this). You also want a separation from the background so that your subject is clear to the viewer. If you're panning then the blur of the background will do ...


4

For the most part, all of the tips that you mention are good to start out with. Nothing beats practice! Get out and shoot someone running, even if it is your friend in your driveway. This question might help a bit as well: Taking sports and action shots with regular lenses In my experience non-professional marathon photography is not that demanding on ...


4

The ideal lens in this situation is probably a 70-200 f/2.8L and the older Mark I USM (non-IS) version, might fall inside the price range on the used market. The lack of IS is less of an issue with sports, where your shutter speed is liable to be up and over 1/focal_length to freeze the action, anyway. There are also three fast prime options you can ...


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