Hot answers tagged

35

The variability you are seeing in your photos is due to the way many types of lighting convert alternating current into light. Although they look constant and steady state to our eyes, in reality they are flickering with the oscillations in the alternating current supplying them with electricity. When shooting under any kind of flickering lighting, ...


25

The blur is caused by the people moving while you were taking the photograph with a slow shutter. Honestly, I think it improves this particular photo a lot: it shows that the people are dancing, rather than just standing in weird positions. If you want to, the only way to avoid it is to use a faster shutter speed. This necessarily involves compromises. If ...


22

Will need flash to achieve good results... You'll not get "excellent quality results" using flash in this situation. Theatrical productions are lit with theatrical lighting. If you want your images to look like the show did to the audience, you need to capture what light the production is using to illuminate the scenes for the audience. You've got ...


16

Camera settings are never going to make this easy. Photographs need light to work, and while modern sensors are actually quite sensitive, they can't live up to our perceptions, because our brains take the dark, noisy image from our eyes and subconsciously make a mental model where the imperfections aren't noticed. You don't mention what lens you are using, ...


14

Honestly, the biggest problem I see in your picture is not the blur, but the badly clipped highlights. Next time, try shooting at, say, -1 EV (which will also reduce the exposure time, and thus the blur, a bit) and adjusting the exposure afterwards to get softer highlights. This does increase noise in the shadows a bit, as if you were using a higher ISO ...


13

Your exposure is a function of - The amount of light reaching the subject (with the quality and direction of the light allowing you to control the effect) The shutter speed (too long leads to blurring as you've seen) The aperture (wide lets in lots of light with shallow depth of field, narrow the reverse) The ISO (like an amplifier dial on a hifi - ...


12

The problem with the prime 35mm is that in order to frame your shot properly, you'll need good mobility. Which you may not always have in a busy and crowded car show. So I would give one point to the 18-200 for that: It'll let you frame your shots even if you can't get yourself at the exact right position you'd need with the 35. Then, the thing is: it's a ...


11

The short answer: It's darker then you think it is. Here's a depiction of various brightnesses and an an exposure value which nominally will give correct exposure at that brightness. Note that these are overlaid — the area of the whole circle is what matters, not the separated rings. This seems shocking, because our eyes are so good at adjusting, but ...


10

Yes, it's coming in through the top of the partially opened door to the left.


9

Keep both eyes open. The strain of squinting or closing an eye over time can be very stressful and headaches are common. http://www.all-things-photography.com/both-eyes-open.html How can one learn to shoot with both eyes open, and what are the advantages?


9

A pop-up flash has barely enough power to work indoors of a residential space; in larger rooms, professional photographers have practical reasons why they carry separate large flashguns. The Puffer, whilst making the light slightly less harsh and therefore more pleasing, does it so at the expense of chewing the power even further down. So, your gear is ...


9

The last thing you want to use is the built in flash. It will only wash out the color and the contrast. The best way to deal with the skylight is to shoot early or late in the day when the illumination from the skylight is not as bright and balances better with the artificial lighting in the room. You are still dealing with several different types of light ...


9

The answer @eftpotrm gave is pretty comprehensive, but let me highlight the single piece of advice that is by far the most likely to give you the desired results: Get a lens with a large maximum aperture, like f/1.8 !! The smaller the number, the better, but f/1.8 is the best that's typically available at a reasonable price. It's going to be a prime lens (...


9

As you have discovered, your camera is limited with regard to the brightest and darkest details it can capture at the same time. In order to keep the lights from 'blowing out' you must limit exposure to the point that the rest of the scene is extremely dark. In order to capture details in the darkest parts of the scene, you must allow the brightest parts (...


8

It sounds like you are pretty new to photography so I'll keep this as easy as I can: Light is your friend, darkness is your enemy :) Push your ISO up as high as you are comfortable with - ISO 1600 or 3200 Open up your variable aperture as wide as possible(use Av priority mode) - f/3.5-5.6 Use a flash or additional lighting as much as possible


8

In addition to the points mattdm has made, you can shoot a few pictures of the same scene in rapid succession. Unlike when using a tripod, you won't be able to achieve perfect alignment of the pictures; without a tripod, the shifts will be rather large and then the fact that there will be a parallax will prevent you from perfectly aligning the pictures. But ...


6

The ISO used will depend upon flash power, how bright/dark the scene is, the subject distance, and what settings the camera and flash are using. That is, it's possible that no, ISO 100 can't be used because the flash doesn't provide enough light. The D5100 built-in flash has a guide number of 39 (measured in feet) at ISO 100. By the math, GN39 / 10 feet (...


6

There isn't necessarily a consistent difference in longevity or quality between LEDs and "regular" bulbs. The most consistent difference is that of color temperature and spectrum. LED lights are newer. They are solid state electronics that, when well designed and decent quality, can run for a very long time. Unlike traditional bulbs, they tend to lose ...


6

It would take a rather brightly lit room to get your ISO down that low. I've got a low hanging, 5 light fixture in a small white room and I just metered f/3.2, 1/60 and ISO 1250. So, bright sun is definitely going to help, but ISO 200 or 100 inside, at f/3.2, without flash is an impossible dream. You either need a faster lens (like a f/1.4) - but that is ...


6

Hopefully you are aware of the relationship between the three main controls that affect exposure: Aperture, Shutter speed and ISO. In this case you've set an aperture of F/2. You have left the decision of shutter speed and ISO to the camera (by selecting Aperture Priority mode, and having Auto ISO on). It's a low light scene, so the camera doesn't have ...


5

For tips you could start with the generic: What are your easiest photography beginner tips? Specific Event Tips For your specific situation, I would recommend scouting the location at the same time of day that the christening is. Do this so you can have an idea of the lighting conditions and also give yourself some ideas of possible locations to shoot. ...


5

IF your subject is not moving (as I saw in the comments) then the things are simpler: put ISO at 400 or less. Use the aperture mode and put the aperture at the best value for your lens (somewhere between f/5.6 - f/8) usually one or two steps down from the largest aperture at that focal length. Use a focal length somewhere in the middle of your zoom range ...


5

Lighting off the camera is going to be a distinct help, but you probably should be aware of a few things in doing so: Hotshoe flashes are small lights, so you want some diffusion if possible. This can be an umbrella or even your own homemade reflector that you point the flash at. Anything that softens and spreads the light so that the source is not ...


5

In the past when looking for a bit more reach/separation I've experimented with both the Canon 100 f/2.8L IS and I found the IS of the 100mm not to be that useful when using ambient light only since shooting at 1/50s or 1/25s leads to subject motion blur in a lot of cases (especially when people are gesturing, laughing etc.) In most cases I had to use 1/...


5

I don't want to use flash Why not ? It's what flash is for. Get a good external flash and learn to love it. Learn to bounce light from the ceiling or using a bounce card or similar. Easy technique, great results. I would, however, agree that blur is useful in these shots sometimes. There's no other way to give a sense of motion. I disagree with the ...


5

In addition to mattdm's suggestion to get a flash or two (which can be a very cheap way to get better light for your image). The sharpness in the sample image looks reasonable for a kit lens - most of the objects are around the edges of the image - and the corners are likely to be the least sharp parts of a lens. The focal plane of a lens is not always flat ...


5

In a comment, you say I mean that simply camera auto settings change luminosity a lot depending on where you point the camera. In particular, I'm shooting the office furniture Right, so... don't do that. Get a meter reading that looks right, and then put your camera on manual mode with those same settings so nothing changes. If needed, adjust shutter ...


5

Will be taking photos both before and after, where I can get rather close to subjects For posed crew and actor shots both before and after, have the crew bump up the stage lights so that you have enough light to shoot without flash. Use your flash as a fill flash if shadows are harsh, either on or off camera as you see fit. From Tetsujin, 'Knowing the ...


5

When you're using the lens at the widest aperture and the photo is still too dark at the longest acceptable shutter time, then the only exposure parameter you have left with that lens is to raise the ISO. Then shoot raw and deal with the noise in post processing.¹ Ultimately, to get better image quality in dim light when you can not increase the exposure ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible