7

It sounds like she's saving uncompressed TIFs. Ps will give you various options such as LZW or ZIP compression when you save. Since TIFF is lossless you can safely choose any of them. JPEG is not a good alternative as it is lossy; you will lose image quality.


4

Assuming Windows OS, if you are comfortable editing your registry: open registry (using regedit command) navigate to HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Microsoft\Windows\CurrentVersion\App Paths look for a key called "Photoshop.exe" if it is there, it will probably contain a path to CS5. Edit the entry and paste in the path to your CS6 executable if it is not ...


3

The original version of Photoshop CS5 (which uses Adobe Camera Raw version 6.0) did not support the Canon 550D. Adobe later released Camera Raw version 6.1 which does include support for the 550D and which is also compatible with CS5. The last version of Adobe camera Raw that works with CS5 is version 6.7. Ask the owner of the PC at your classes if they can ...


3

Saving TIFF files doesn't make sense to me. The original RAW is more space-efficient, and of course contains all the inforation to be had. I save the original RAW file and one or more post-processed JPG results. If I want to go back and make a version that's a little darker, more snappy contrast, more detail in the clouds, or whatever, I do that by going ...


2

There has been some posted issues on this problem for CS5 at this link: http://feedback.photoshop.com/photoshop_family/topics/colour_glitches_when_switching_to_fullscreen_mode_in_photoshop An easy test is to turn off OpenGL Drawing in Preferences and see if the problem goes away. Hope this helps.


2

Select the background layer in the layers tab, goto the menu Layer > Align Layers to Selection - then choose your desired alignment.


2

If you layer those in Photoshop and use subtract or difference blend modes, you'll end up with a result that should show the relative difference of each pixel. Use that result to create a mask (Image > Apply Image, target layer mask) Then starting with the first image, add an exposure adjustment layer, and use the above mask - I would expect you'd get ...


2

Not a Photoshop-based answer: You are making things difficult for yourself with your granite background. The first thing to do is to shoot your objects against a plain background, then if needed you select the background and not the object, then invert the selection (but if done properly you can get a background so white that you won't even need to cut it ...


1

The quick selection tool has two modes: adding and removing. When you're adding, the cursor has a + sign inside it; when you're removing, the cursor has a - sign inside it. When the tool has gone too far, as in your picture, start removing. Click the icon in the top tool bar that shows the - sign, and start dragging in the part that should not be in the ...


1

I have used the free software Hugin to achieve this. Although primarily for building panorama's Hugin is a GUI for various tools including align_image_stack for aligning stacks of images in preparation for creating focus stacks or HDR blends with enfuse. With a little experimentation you can use the tools either from the command line or from within Hugin. ...


1

I don't have an explanation on why one image becomes darker when merged, but perhaps "reversing" the process might help, first creating three panorama images, one per exposure setting (-1, 0, +1 EV), then running the HDR processing one those three images?


1

I assume your question is, how can I read them on another PC? Photoshop CS5 should include Adobe Camera Raw, which should have no problem reading RAW files. Failing that, you could see if the class will allow you to download something like RAWTherapee, an open source RAW editor.


1

I think the issue is simply the Lasal Luster paper. In my experience, Lasal is a very contrasty paper (I have used both Moab's ICC profiles as well as my own created with DataColor Spyder Print). It is actually one of the things I love about it...it has some extremely DEEP blacks, and for certain types of prints, I think that is ideal. You lose detail in ...


1

You are experiencing a data communications issue at some point. When large files are transferred they are broken up into packets and then reassembled. When some of the data is corrupted then the packets don't get reassembled in the correct order, or some of the packets aren't the correct length and so the rendering program thinks bits that are supposed to be ...


1

Check the version of DPP installed on your computer. The DPP version on your computer should be the one that is compatible with your camera. Higher version is not necessarily the best for your camera. I faced the same issue as you had. My camera was 550D and the DPP I had installed on my computer was v3.5.x (which was downloaded off the Internet because I ...


1

Hmm. Weird! Try using DPP with your 'unopenable' raw files. If DPP doesn't open them then there may be something wrong with your camera or memory card. Have you tried using a different memory card? have you tried shooting tethered w/o a memory card and have the images copied straight to the computer?


1

In terms of simplicity for yourself, the simplest approach is to shoot just RAW, then go through the images using Lightroom/Bridge/Canon's Digital Photo Professional/etc. and edit the ones you consider editing worthy and leave the ones you think are fine. Then just batch convert all image - which you can then stick in a dedicated folder (say called JPEG) ...


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