42

TL;DR - Pretty much everything in your post indicates that you don't really need a new camera, but need to learn how to use the equipment that you have. I haven't used RAW... it still boggles my mind a bit that the RAW to JPEG conversion can't have an option to do this automatically. This is like driving a race car and never shifting past second. The ...


18

Technically any software that is capable of stitching regular photos would be capable of stitching macro photos as well. However, to be able to accurately stitch photos they need to be taken with little or no parallax (movement of the camera's optical centre). This is typically achieved by rotating the camera/lens about it's optical centre using a "VR" ...


17

You might want to look at weather forecasts for astronomy - some of these sites go into more details than generic weather forecasts, and have predictions for things of interest to astronomers, including seeing (how steady/turbulent the atmosphere is) and transparency (how clear the atmosphere is). A web search for "astronomical weather forecasts" will find ...


14

This picture is a composition of slices of many photos taken from different heights, likely from a drone. The key to understanding it is to examine the camera's perspective or point of view from different horizontal slices of the composited image. For approximately the bottom quarter of the image, the camera is below the roof lines of the buildings at the ...


12

Don't use the camera's automatic "Easy Panorama" mode. Take the series of pictures manually and use desktop-computer software to stitch them together. This is a little more work on your part, but will be more flexible and probably yield better results anyway.


12

Almost any camera system will out perform a camera phone when used properly. A camera phone uses a tiny sensor so even MFT cameras have a bigger sensor capturing more light so superior in low light conditions. Phones use night mode to overcome their bad high ISO performance. Night mode in most cases is a merge of several images to get more information. ...


11

A good overview of the techniques for shooting this type of 360x180/equirectangular/VR panorama can be found on Eric Rougier's fromparis website. The basic process is to shoot enough images to cover the entire sphere, and then stitch them together as a panorama. Mappings Those "six shots" you're seeing are typically remapped cube faces from a full ...


11

A big reason is that it just makes getting the shot sequence consistent and accurate. In general, you're looking to keep the vertical plane level through the whole sequence and move along the horizontal plane in smooth, even, steps. A panoramic head is simply going to make that easier to do with less effort and risk of a muffed shot at all kinds of focal ...


11

If the old days you are thinking of are the late 1990s, you were probably using an "APS" camera. This is where the "APS-C" sensor size common in DSLRs today came from, but actually had three modes. The film frame size was 30.2 × 16.7 mm. When the full frame was used, this was called "APS-H" (with the "H" referring to HDTV ­— note the 16:9 aspect ratio). You ...


10

As a general rule, the stitching program should get the highest possible detail of the images, allowing it to make the best out of it. Therefore, I would not pre-process the images as it might degrade the information. However, if you have a large amount of input images, it might get difficult to work with the resulting large picture afterwards, due to your ...


10

The answer to this depends on the viewing distance. The usual rule of 300 PPI works well for close-up viewing, but even that isn't a hard-and-fast rule. What's more important is Pixels-Per-Degree (PPD), which is more representative of our eye's ability to resolve detail, and is dependent on a specific/typical viewing distance. Apple's Retina displays (...


10

Distance to the closest object Let's say the closest object from your lens is a chair at 50cm. The different shots will be very different regarding this chair. If the closest object is like 5m away the misalignment will be smaller. So you have to decide or prepare the scene or your point of view to minimize this defect. One option is to have this close ...


9

I know this is late but I have been doing HDR panoramas that have been successful. Here is my method: I stitch first using Hugin. If I bracket say -2,0 and +2 stops I will have three sets of exposures to stitch. I first stitch the set that has the most detail because Hugin will be able to make the best set of control points from this set. Let's say the -...


9

It is defenitely stitched, although I must say it's done quite well! Here are two examples I found in a minute. With the cameras they have nowadays I don't think it took very long at all. Assuming it is a few gigapixels, using a 50MP camera, you would only need about 100 pictures. With the ammount of light those can be taken in less than a minute (with ...


9

I wanted a rotating-lens panoramic camera about 20 years ago. I wanted one that used 35mm film. At the time there were three options – Widelux, Horizon or Noblex. I ignored Widelux cameras because they were out of production and seemed hard to obtain. I believe they were made in Japan. I know that Neil Leifer used one from time to time on assignment for ...


8

360x180 panos can be taken with a variety of gear, but they do get harder to take in certain situations. The first factor, obviously, is scene coverage. Either taking multiple shots or using multiple cameras simultaneously (as Google does), you have to cover the entire sphere. You can use specialized lenses to maximize the coverage per shot, or take more ...


8

Don't use Photoshop's Photomerge to stitch; use a more sophisticated panorama stitching package that allows for perspective correction and a variety of mappings. You also need to work on your shooting technique. The main issue here is the perspective, and the panorama's mapping. Some of the recommendations here, though, don't make a lot of sense. A tilt-...


7

Since I prefer to do as much editing of things like brightness, WB, contrast, etc. as possible before converting from RAW, I tend to edit each before stitching. I save final sharpening adjustments until after the merge. The nice thing about using Canon's Digital Photo Professional, which I normally use for RAW conversion, is that you can copy/paste a "recipe"...


7

They give you a completely different quality. The stitched solution can result in images that you could make 10ft long prints with. The single shot solution will be easier but will be of limited quality. Some other things to think about. - you can get a fisheye lens at some point with stitched solution and still just require a few shots. - the single shot ...


7

Whenever you compare in-camera to post processing you end up with exactly the same advantages to post processing: Control Lightroom for photos or photomatics for HDR has lots and lots of options and sliders, there's no way you can get all of them into a camera-size interface - and even if you could they are things you want to change and experiment with ...


7

The D5200 does not have a panorama mode built in. You will need to take multiple shots and stitch them in software like Photoshop or Hugin. When you take your shots, do not simply stand still and twist at the waist. This will result in distorted panoramas. Instead, you need to imagine that the end of the lens is attached to a pole in the ground, and pivot ...


7

Stitching RAW files is problematic. In order to get a good stitch you ideally want to correct vignetting and distortion first, something that you would do in your RAW converter, then just output TIFFs of a smaller size (no need for full size when combining multiple files usually) and things will be both quicker and more accurate.


7

It depends on the scene you're trying to shoot, how you're trying to shoot it, and what kind of 360 panorama you're making. Coverage and parallax are two separate things, so, no you can't "fix" parallax errors by shooting more coverage with more overlap. And yes, stitching programs can encounter alignment problems when parallax comes into play with nearby ...


7

What you are seeing is a high amount of distortion, specifically barrel distortion. One method to correct for this is to use a tilt-shift lens. You can use the lens manipulations to correct a great deal of what you are experiencing. You can also account for distortion using post processing software. Modern panoramic software has the ability to account ...


7

This is just my opinion, but there's no way to "fix" stitching errors other than to re-stitch the panorama, and if you don't have the original images, but just the resultant panorama, then there's no way to do that.


7

It sounds like you need to show them, not just babble at them. It might also help to have them do this once in a controlled situation (your office, their office, the lunchroom, etc) with you watching, then have them do the stitching together of the panorama. Or maybe just watch you do it once. Either way, they get some appreciation for what it will be ...


6

You can use mosaic mode in Hugin for these types of panos.


6

Firstly, I originally mentioned zooming as something you shouldn't do when shooting a panorama, then added "unless you really know what you're doing", this advice still holds, it's not recommended but there are circumstances where it could possibly be of some benefit, such as when shooting a very wide rectilinear projection panorama using only a single row ...


6

I've liked to use Microsoft ICE for my stitch jobs. It is quite simple to use, quite automatic in its operations, and it is free :) I did a quick stitch with some handheld shots covering an area of roughly 2½ x 3 grid of images. Total number of images for this was 11 shots. I was shooting over a high fence with arms stretched straight up. Result is not very ...


6

You can try to add images into Hugin and calculate) coordinates of images (or move them in OpenGl preview by hand), six faces will differ Yaw (0,60,120,180,240,300), top and bottom will have Pitch +90 and -90 , and then you must figure right projection (switch objectives) and hfov to "fill the frame". Then you can render it. I have successfully used this ...


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