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48

Thanks for all the feedback. Mixing and matching what other answers that were given, I got this. Mixing it all together a bit, here is a very very quick snapshop of what I'm going to do. Please note that I did this in 5 min, didn't take out all the gear...and only did the neck part for demonstration. STEP 1: Take a simple picture picture of your item on ...


34

I'm chiming in to introduce you to: the tub trick. Tubs are great: they're white they're shiny Combined, you get a place to set things that'll bounce around the light and provide for a mostly white background. Here's my tub complete with window lighting: And here's the shot, placing the item on the rail and cropping out the rest: I did use the ...


29

We're talking about perspective here. How far you are from your subject affects the way your subject's proportions look. Try shooting the same thing with the 18-135, say at 135 mm, but this time forget for a while about filling the frame properly and step back a meter or two (while keeping the same angle). Take the shot, then crop it in software so that it ...


24

You can use Photoshop's Vanishing Point filter for this. It's easiest to use a 3D-capable version of Photoshop,¹ which I presume you have, since you haven't mentioned any other 3D software. There is an alternate path for those using a version of Photoshop that lacks the 3D features, which I will cover inline below. This technique works best with a ...


24

shutter speed 0.5 seconds This is likely to be a bit of your problem. The shutter causes vibration of the camera. So, too, does your hand pushing the release button. At faster speeds, this vibration does not affect the shot. Likewise, at very slow speeds (a few seconds +). But there’s a sweet spot somewhere between a second or two and ~1/30 where that ...


23

Mike Stimpson (balakov on Flickr) is an absolute maestro of Lego photography, and best of all he maintains a separate account - Balakov's Setups - where he shares his behind-the-scenes shots, showing his full lighting setup and more. Here are a couple of examples:


21

The important thing is to use a bounce flash (indirect flash) to avoid reflections, which is what makes the most photos look so unprofessional and ugly. There are some good explanations and tutorial on how to use a bounce-flash correctly, which would be way too much here: Lighting tip - 4 ways to bounce a flash Homemade Bounce Flash instructions In ...


19

In the immortal words of the late National Geographic photo editor Bob Gilka, "Kid, if you want to be a better photographer, you're going to have to stand in front of more interesting stuff." That said, welcome to the sometimes not-so-wonderful world of the commercial/industrial photographer. As often as not, making a dramatic, exciting picture of something ...


17

There are many improvements that could be made here. Firstly, you need to use a much longer exposure, and a lower ISO setting. Get a tripod, even a cheap one, and use mirror lockup. Could do with stopping down a bit further for depth of field. Post processing You might be able to get away with your current shots, with some post processing. Here I've taken ...


17

First of all, it's important to realize that, when you photograph a reflective object, you're actually photographing the surrounding scenery as it reflects off the object. This means that it's not enough to just set the object in a lightbox and maybe point some spot lights at it, at least unless you want to make the reflections rather simple and dull. ...


16

The coin reflects light. With a light shining straight on it, much of it may be reflected straight back at the camera: The first thing to do is move the light to the side and put a dark object where it used to be. The dark object is now reflected in the coin, but that's not noticeable: There are still many specular highlights on the relief and lettering, ...


16

Any flatbed scanner, such as that in a $75 all-in-one printer, will do a better job photographing DVD cases than a D5 or a Hasselblad.


15

There are some articles online specifically oriented towards taking photographs of LEGO creations. Indeed, the reflectivity of the plastic imposes some additional difficulties which you have to be aware of (especially black flat surfaces). Here are a few tutorials and other general articles: Three Stages to Better Photos of LEGO Creations LEGO photography ...


15

I would start with this question "How to properly do shadowless product photos". Once you have that down, the only real differences for this type of photography is the mannequin that you are going to add in. You have two options, you can add in a mannequin, and shoot multiple shots with pieces of the mannequin missing and not missing(ie neck). Then you would ...


15

Put a white sheet between you and the trophy - some distance from the trophy, but basically "all around". Cut a rectangular hole in it that is about the size of the trophy. Use a long lens, and shoot the trophy through the hole. Now most of what is reflected will be "white sheet", with just a small hole in the middle where you were standing. If you further ...


15

Don't use auto white balance - choose a color temperature that looks well and stick to it (or use a gray card if the color accuracy is important) Close all the windows - the daylight color changes based on weather, if possible use only flashes and photographic color balanced lights, if you must use normal indoor lights try not to change light bulbs, if you ...


14

For clear ice cubes: Use filtered water, not straight from the tap. Boil it and let it cool down. Boil it a second time and let it cool down. (this double boil gets rid of dissolved air in the water, which is a big source of haze) You may need to slow down the freezing by putting your ice mold inside a bigger tray filled with water - fast freezing from the ...


14

The white background effect is usually done by lighting the background and the subject separately, you can't do this with such a small box. There are no camera settings that will help you because your problem is that the difference in brightness between the background and subject is too small - and everything that makes the picture darker or brighter ...


14

I'm not a photography expert at all, but I have spent my whole life playing, buying, and most importantly looking at pictures of games of various kinds. I also have painted many miniatures and developed ways to take good pictures of them without spending a lot of money on serious photo equipment over the years. So here are some thoughts from a gamer ...


12

I'd recommend reading the book Light: Science and Magic by Hunter, Fuqua, and Biver. It has a whole chapter dedicated to lighting glass. From memory, it says that with glass it's lighting the edges correctly that is important in coveying the qualities of glass. (No connection to the book by the way, other than being a satisfied reader).


12

Get a polarizer filter. You'd typically want the "circular" ones, though in this day and age you'd be hard-pressed to find one that's not. I noticed that your first and third shots show some reflection due to the board's gloss---you can remove that with a polarizer. Though most cameras not featuring an interchangeable lens system don't allow filters to be ...


12

To avoid the flash obscuring the text on the case, I would take the photo at a angle to the surface on which the DVD rests. Sounds like you're probably using the built-in flash on your camera. A better solution would be to take the photo straight on, and arrange the illumination so that the subject is lit from an angle. That might mean using an off-camera ...


12

Let's assume you have no equipment at all & are not going to be able to get any right now - then a cloudy day is the best you can hope for. A sunny day will make hard shadows, cloudy days don't. Cloudy days are also a 'good white'. Artificial light is a bit of an unknown factor, which your camera will have a harder time guessing at, especially if you use ...


11

I can see several things you could do, based on the previous answer & comments, as well as the original question. [Some are repeats.] You need more light. Longer exposure if you have a tripod or higher ISO if you don't. As your subject is static, you can go really long on exposure. Get a wired remote [10 bucks on eBay] & set the camera to 1s ...


11

Construct an omnidirectional chamber. This can be a tent constructed using a bedsheet or a rectangular cavity constructed using snow-white Styrofoam sheets from Home Depot or white poster paper. You place the object to be photographed under the tent on inside the cavity. In your case, a tent might be better. You then purchase several R-30 reflector flood ...


10

There are a few things that could be done to get better photographs to start with (and some things you can fix afterwards, but would be better fixed when the shots are taken): photograph from directly above dead center to avoid the perspective distortion you see in these photos (with the top edge narrower than the bottom edge). This can be corrected in ...


10

You WILL have reflections - the question is: what would you like to see there? Seriously. Because 1. You will have to put that there or 2. Do that in post-processing. Both is painful, #2 is a bit less money-wasting, but more time-wasting. :-) You could use a polarizer to remove reflections, if that helps. Makes the object look dull though... Also, you can ...


10

This feedback covers the framing of the shots, less the technical aspect of it. I would dig more into the feedback you got - I was told recently that my image work needed to improve. What is important to the editors? I wouldn´t worry about taking the games outside during winter, unless this is where the boardgames are beeing played. One idea to take the ...


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