40

This has bothered me for years, especially on laptop screens that have no hardware calibration option. Here's an instant fix: Windows Registry Editor Version 5.00 [HKEY_CURRENT_USER\Control Panel\Mouse] "MouseTrails"="-1" Save that as a .reg, merge it and then Log Off/On. With mouse trails enabled windows uses a different render for the cursor which in ...


25

A well know technique is called "luminosity masks". You create a selection mask where the pixels selection level is: 100% or near 100% in the luminosity range that you want to change, 0% or very low in the luminosity range you don't want to change, intermediate for pixels between these two ranges This done by: making a grayscale copy of your image ...


23

Other users gave great answers about tuning your computer. However since you mentioned costco, this is a costco specific answer: I've sent many prints to costco and had great luck. However not so much, before I realized that they were "auto correcting" images. One batch of birth announcements I had to send three times because the color was "off" no matter ...


17

Color laser printers, especially the big high end office printers, have the color capabilities you need for printing the company logo and the occasional Excel pie chart — but they are truly bad for printing photos. But the good news is that almost any of the current generation of ink jet printers, even the cheap ones, are pretty good at printing photos - ...


16

Ideally, you're shooting in an environment with controlled lighting (a single light source, or several tuned to same color temperature), your subject and black or white surfaces only. In this case, the angle does not matter - just take care that its exposure falls somewhere in the middle in your test shot (so you're not accidentally clipping a channel). In ...


15

OK... I used to run a print shop so i think i qualify to answer this. Any print shop that can print 36x20 inhouse will be using a large format inkjet printer, id say Epson, HP or Canon. Assuming the printer is reasonably new (IE < 4 years) it will almost definitely use good inks - in Epson's case UltraChrome. IF the print shop uses a constant feed ink ...


15

Inherently, no. The RGB model is natural for recording light, and the CMYK model is natural for printing (where reflected light is subtracted). But see Are RGB numeric values equal to CMYK percentages? — the loss in conversation isn't inherently because RGB to CMYK is inherently lossy, but because the actual color spaces of the devices used are different, ...


14

I have one. You're right — it's a good value for the money, and there's basically no catch except that if you're running under Mac or Windows you'll need to know a little more about what you're doing than you might if you just bought one of the big-name devices. That's because there's only software for Linux. If you are using Linux (any modern distribution),...


14

The color correction is acting as expected. The point of using a color target is to adjust for the color of light to assume that the light is white. If you want to have the color that is present when shooting, you should instead use a fixed white point that you consider to be standard white, but naturally people's eyes will adjust quite a bit for the color ...


11

xvYCC is a particular clever way of encoding color data: it abuses the YCC representation by using previously-forbidden combinations of values to represent colors outside the gamut of the RGB space used in the YCC scheme. That is, some YCC tuples decode to colors with negative R G or B values. Previously these were simply illegal; in xvYCC these are ...


11

Color management is an annoyance that I've recently been learning about; it is not completely accurate to say that just because your monitor can only display sRGB that it's meaningless for your photos to be edited in the AdobeRGB or ProPhotoRGB space. What is actually happening is that Lightroom is translating colors from ProPhotoRGB into the sRGB space ...


11

These cameras have microadjustment capability, just not in a user-accessible way. The exact method varies by model. Some have a software feature in an advanced (and secret) "debug" menu — the Pentax K10D, for example, had this. Others have physical adjustment screws or similar (like earlier Canon Rebel models). Or, repair centers may simply use shims. To ...


10

Printing a picture seems like it should be easy but there is a lot more involved when it comes to getting predictable colors from what you see on the screen to the print. The first step is calibrating your monitor. This ensures that your monitor is displaying colors correctly. You can purchase a calibrator from companies such as Colorvision (Spyder series) ...


10

from Charles Poynton "The rehabilitation of gamma": Misconception: The nonlinearity of a CRT monitor is a defect that needs to be corrected. Fact: The nonlinearity of a CRT is very nearly the inverse of the lightness sensitivity of human vision. The nonlinearity causes a CRT’s response to be roughly perceptually uniform. Far from being a defect, ...


10

I'll interpret your question in the opposite way everyone else has. You seem to me to be asking how to prevent the details becoming visible again. Once you have darkened your image, increase the black point. This will make the new shadows actually black, and prevent the details from being recovered. You can do this in levels in most editors, or with curves: ...


9

If everything is working correctly, the difference should be subtle and you shouldn't generally notice a big shift. I have a suspicion: You may be working on a monitor which is not capable of rendering the whole Adobe RGB gamut. In this case, out-of-gamut colors are clipped or approximated (perhaps poorly). When you convert to sRGB, the colors are mapped ...


9

Hopefully someone more knowledgeable than me will complete my response. The little I know about these curves follows: 1) Characteristic Curves: The more a negative is exposed, the darker it gets. The log-log density/exposure curves simply show how dark the film gets in response to more exposure. These lines do not coincide on color negatives, because of ...


8

There is a very nice step by step tutorial for your idea: Monitor Color Calibration for free using your DSLR He adjusts his monitor settings starting with color temperature settings. After that he adjusts the color gain of red, green and blue after taking some more photographs of his monitor showing a color calibration chart. Everything is done manually. ...


8

There are several issues related to Phase Detection Auto Focus performance. You first must determine what the source of the problem is. It could be caused by one of several factors, or a combination of some or all of them. If you also have the problem when using the Contrast Detection AF in Live View, then the problem is somewhere else. Front/Back focusing. ...


8

The color of sunlight reaching the surface changes based on the thickness and quality (in terms of things like particulate matter and water vapor suspended in it) of the air it passes through. Whether the sun is at an angle 30º above the horizon because it is noon in winter at a high latitude or because it is 4 p.m. in the tropics doesn't make much ...


8

Yes - you need to calibrate your monitor. One option, which is what I did, is to buy a relatively cheap colorimeter, at the time the Huey Pro was generally available. I used it as a travel colorimeter. Later, when I wasn't traveling as much, I bought a more expensive colorimeter (Lacie Blue-Eye Pro) for my home IPS monitor. I found that the cheaper ...


8

TLDR: Choose a print shop that provides ICC profiles. Soft proofing is an important step for optimal results. If a shop doesn't share its profiles there are two reasons that come to my mind: lack of knowledge (very bad), or different printer types for the same printing product, meaning multiple orders could give different results even with the same ...


8

I think it was the EktaSpace that was invented to hold all colors of films. Since silver halide color papers are still used as media for printing from digital, there are also color profiles of photographic papers floating around the Internet. See https://www.drycreekphoto.com/icc/ for examples. These should give you some idea. As you can imagine, ...


8

The tool displaycal-profile-info, part of the DisplayCAL package, can do this. This works (and works basically the same way) for Windows, Mac, and Linux. See for example for my (calibrated) ThinkPad screen: ... which has a 60% coverage of sRGB and 43% coverage of Adobe RGB.


7

The CMM Flags field is referring to Color Management Module flags. In this case, its saying that the ICC profile the JPEG image is tagged with is not embedded. It is possible, although not required, to embed ICC profiles within images, including JPEG images (as according to the very document you linked:) B.4 Embedding ICC profiles in JPEG files The ...


7

There are two things at play. One is the spectrum and the other is the shape of the light-source. If you place both types of light in a soft-box, you will be wipe out the difference in shape which will make the harsh look and appearance of imperfections, bumps, wrinkles match more closely. The spectrum of an incandescent bulb is more more uniform and ...


7

If the image is accurate for color there can be a few things going on here. None easy to fix. As I had mentioned in an earlier answer about LED display technology, this is more than likely a metameric match produced my your measurement device from the narrow band LED backlight. The problem with LED backlights (or any backlight for that matter) is that ...


7

You would convert the image to the sRGB color profile. This profile is indended to match the color capabilities of a monitor. This is commonly used for images that are used in web pages, and for example offered as an option when exporting images for web in Photoshop. By converting the image to sRGB the color profile can be omitted from the file, which ...


7

Consider this example from Cambridge in Colour: By applying gamma encoding, we are able to represent the original image more accurately, with the same bit depth (5, in this example). This is achieved by using the 32 levels in a way that more closely corresponds to the human eye. In other words, it's a form of compression. JPEGs, for example, can actually ...


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