46

Because there is a lot happening in a short timeframe (movement phases of a fast animal or athlete), and you want to photograph it all and/or the exact timing of the relevant event cannot be predicted, so covering as many possible times where that event could happen (and discarding the rest later) is necessary and/or redundant pictures are needed ...


37

Strictly speaking, one does not need high FPS burst modes for sports or wildlife, but rather they are useful tools that open up more options. I've shot sports in the last few years with a Canon 7D, typically using 5-8 frame bursts (at I think 8fps) at a time, and I've also used a medium format manual focus camera. Both methods have produced great images, ...


15

It could be to reduce camera shake. I use this technique in a lot and in poor light it can be very effective. Pushing the shutter button causes the camera move a little, so by holding it down for a burst of three, the first image may have some residual movement from your finger, whilst the last image might have some shake as you start to release the shutter, ...


15

In addition to all the correct answers about how fast action occurs, I'd like to point out two fundamental biological reasons for why you need burst: 100ms. This is the fastest we can react to a stimulus. Olympic sprinters start to contract their muscles 100ms after the starter's gun goes off. Any event which occurs faster than this cannot be captured by ...


11

The maximum frame rates are just that - maximum frame rates. There are several things that will reduce the maximum frame rate. High ISO The higher the ISO you have selected, the slower the frame rate will be. Noise Reduction the stronger the in-camera noise reduction selected, the slower the frame rate will be. AI Servo Mode If you are using AI Servo AF ...


10

My camera has high speed 6.5 fps and low speed 3 fps. I use 3 fps most of the time. This is good for normal slow situations of people. 333ms is enough time to allow facial expression/eye blinking to change between the shots. 6.5fps is just way too fast and I fill up my CF card too fast and sorting the photos in the end will waste too much time. So I consider ...


10

Was the man really standing still? Sometimes they talk. It's annoying when they talk and they also blink and look weird with their mouth half open. Bursting it may avoid cases of disfigured man half talking. Maybe he was bracketing something? Maybe the man is still now, but tends to move randomly? and so he left it on burst mode.


9

I don't know why people shoot in burst mode but I shoot in burst mode for the following reasons: It lets you capture the moment and the moments before and the moments after. Sometimes you may go wrong with your judgement about the best moments. I know this is a bad practice but there are a lots of things happening in an event that I have to concentrate on ...


8

This kind of fast then slow performance (as you correctly guessed) will be because of the image buffer filling up. Using a faster card will help until you reach the limit of the camera's circuitry - you may have reached this limit. Even if your camera's performance is faster than the SD card. It's quite possible that some of the card's 'bandwidth' is taken ...


7

Consider this: If your camera had twice as much buffer memory it would be able to take roughly twice as many photos before running out of memory, but it would also then take roughly twice as long for the buffer to clear. So after the initial extra 5-10 shots twice a deeper buffer would allow, you would then still be limited to the exact same frame rate you ...


7

The speed of the memory card is definitely one constraining factor but as you suspect there are other bottlenecks. First there is the internal memory buffer of the camera. Each camera only has so much RAM installed. When you shoot this buffer is filled first and the camera does what it can to quickly empty the buffer to allow for more shooting. The size of ...


6

Several things can limit the maximum potential frame rate. While sensor read on a mirrorless camera can be very fast, theoretically allowing frame rates above 12, the whole read and image processing pipeline has to support the desired frame rate. In addition to the sensor, you also have the ADC (which may be on or off die, and parallel or not), the image ...


6

First, if he took a single photo, it could have been blurred if the camera shook and taking several photos will mean you definitely have one that is clear and not blurred. Also, when he analyses the photos later, he might find that in one, the man blinked, in another, he looked away and in another, someone's hand was in the way. Burst also reduces camera ...


6

Mirror moves so that you can track image in real time, framing object better and keeping eye on surroundings. Also, when mirror comes back to normal position, so does AF/AE system. In some DSLRs (maybe SLRs as well) quick shooting with mirror locked-up (and sometime additional restrictions like locked metering) gives higher frame-rate. Example is Canon's ...


5

As with just about any camera, a buffer will be used to hold a number of shots which are written to the card. Once the buffer fills, the frame rate slows. Even with the fastest cards today, previous generation cameras can't offload their buffer fast enough to sustain a high FPS indefinitely. So, this isn't a new problem to the 1D X or D4, though the speed ...


5

Canon 1D X Photo size of this camera should be somewhere in range of 20-30 mb, and with 12 frames per second that sums up to need to write down 300mb/s, or if we consider that the camera has dual card slot, this would amount to 150 mb/s per card (does this work this way?). Is there anything on market that would sustain such a write speed? Short: ...


5

In good light, your shutter speed will be something like a hundredth of a second (or less), so it's basically negligible in the limitations of continuous-drive. There's some inherent limits from moving the mirror and resetting the shutter, but the primary limits are processing time and writing the data. It takes some time to read the sensor data and to ...


4

The main advantage is easier continuous shooting over an extended time. Generally, continuous shooting goes in to a buffer and eventually that buffer fills. When shooting high quality RAW images particularly, that buffer can fill within 6 to 12 shots on many cameras. Even my 5D Mark III fills the buffer (with two very high speed cards) in about 17 shots ...


4

The amount of data to save to the memory card is one of several factors which affect framerate. As you've noted, big RAW files can drag things down. Saving smaller files — lower resolution or higher compression — can work around this limitation. But at some point, other limitations, like physical shutter speed, come into effect. If you've hit one of those, ...


4

If it was exactly 3 photos per shutter press, they were most likely using bracketing rather than simple burst shooting. Bracketing can be used for a number of different purposes, but the concept is that it takes some aspect of the camera and changes the setting between shots. Exposure, Flash Power, White Balance, Focus, etc can all be varied slightly to ...


4

The higher the ISO setting, the more noise reduction most cameras will do. This requires more processing time per photo. Also, the noisier the photo is, the more unique colors it usually contains. Since even RAW files are usually compressed (though in a non-lossy manner), the more unique colors an image contains the larger the file will be and the longer it ...


4

Because in most shooting modes you want the camera to perform Auto Focus and/or metering between each frame. If you are shooting action or sports and your subject is moving towards or away from you AF for each frame is essential. In conventionally designed DLSRs, the mirror must be down to auto focus and to meter. There are some higher end cameras that ...


4

1/2000 is the time the shutter is open. What you are looking for is frame rate, frames per second (fps), and the two are not directly related. The D7100 maxes out at 5-7 fps. The mirror lockup seems to be for only one picture at a time (p. 61 in the user's guide), and won't increase the frame rate. You can get a higher frame rate with video: Your camera ...


4

For a specific case where a high FPS is useful, consider cricket photography (the game, not the insect). When a batter takes a swing at the ball, there are potentially a number of outcomes worth taking a photo of: He hits the ball The ball hits the stumps and sends the bails flying The optimal time to take the photo is slightly different depending on the ...


3

AFAIK there is no way to do that with camera settings, nor with any mainstream tethering software (You may be able to do that if you don't mind getting your hands dirty and coding something, but it would just be too much effort). If you have the resources available you can do that shooting at 1/30 or more and firing a flash at the beginning (although I ...


3

What you are comparing are the limits manufacturers chose to implement on thos models. It is not a reflection of what is possible but of what they choose to build in order to make it into a viable product. Speed is limited by the slowest component in a chain. So, in order to make faster continuous shooting possible, the camera must have correspondingly fast ...


3

It may be that they are using a cheap buffer that doesn't support simultaneous read and write. If that is the case, then it would start writing to the memory card right away after taking the photo and wouldn't be able to write to it again until it is completed. If you have a similar issue in burst where you have to wait for it to save after you shoot a ...


3

It depends on the capabilities of the transmitter and receiver and how the transmitter is triggered. In general if the transmitter is attached to the hot shoe or PC connection of the camera you are operating ('master'), then one short signal to fire will be emitted each time the 'master' camera's shutter fires, since that is what activates the hot shoe/PC ...


3

On DSLRs, 99% of times, the frame rate stays the same regardless of resolution. Yours is one exception but not the only one. The Pentax K20D for example shot at 20 FPS at 1 MP. From capture to storage there are a chain of events happening and the frame rate is limited by the slowest step: AF, Metering, Exposure (Shutter), Mirror, Reading sensor, converting ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible