20

I can not imagine damage that would impact focusing without visible damage to the packaging or the camera. These things are pretty sturdy. you would have to damage the mirror or shutter box to really have an impact. So I suspect user error. These images appear to be in focus, but perhaps not where the photographer expected. I see areas in focus in both. ...


15

From my experience with my 7D and now a 5D (mkIII), I'd say for wildlife stuff, the 7D would be your preferred choice, for four reasons:- APS-C 1.6x crop sensor. This will extend the reach of any and all lenses you put on your camera. A 200mm becomes a 320, a 400mm becomes a 640, etc. Using teleconverters will cost you light, and therefore require slower ...


15

When you look closely the only thing that is the same on the feature list is the approximate number of megapixels. The mkIII is an entirely new camera, new type of chassis, new viewfinder, new shutter assembly, new button layouts, new software. Nothing has been recycled, unlike the mkII. the higher FPS shooting, and the dual storage to SD Card are nice I ...


13

Is the Canon 17-40mm L lens good for architecture and real estate photography - Absolutely. Keep in mind that especially at 17mm you will need to remove the barrel distortion in post processing. If you are especially worried about this, and want to take the extra time and attention that it requires, you might be interested in tilt shift lenses or perspective ...


12

Based on the specs the 6D has a smaller lighter body better AF system WIFI and GPS built it slightly better screen and more recent UI SD card slot instead of CF (users may have a preference, or a collection of cards already) The 5D mkII has magic lantern firmware option lower price CF card slot is available now plus a host of lesser differences, e.g. ...


12

The zoom helps with crop sensors but that's not the main reason. Basically on a full frame sensor the 8-15 is two lenses in one, at 8mm it's a full fisheye with a circular image and a 180 degree vertical field of view. At 15mm it's a diagonal  fisheye, with 180 degrees corner to corner and no black areas. Even if you don't want to shoot circular ...


11

If you shoot under 400iso and don't print large, you won't notice much difference in the image quality. If you shoot higher ISOs, the Mk II has less noise. Practically speaking, the screen on the MK I is the most annoying thing if you're used to the MK II. Colour accuracy and sharpness during playback are poor compared to the MKII and newer cameras- and far ...


11

The maximum frame rates are just that - maximum frame rates. There are several things that will reduce the maximum frame rate. High ISO The higher the ISO you have selected, the slower the frame rate will be. Noise Reduction the stronger the in-camera noise reduction selected, the slower the frame rate will be. AI Servo Mode If you are using AI Servo AF ...


10

All else being equal, yes. A bigger sensor requires more power. Advancement in power-saving technologies can sometimes improve that but with higher pixel counts being the norm, we do not see much of that. Each pixel requires circuitry so higher megapixels require more power than making the sensor bigger. Luckily bigger cameras have room for bigger ...


9

Refer to page 19 of your ST-E3-RT manual. It specifies that when used with camera models released prior to 2012 (so, anything but the 1DX and 5D mark III at the time of this post) you lose high speed sync and your max sync speed is "one increment slower" than whatever it would normally be. The flash sync speed is 1 increment slower Check the flash ...


9

I think you should, in fact, use the slightly-smaller value. That's not because I've measured, but because I can resolve the apparent contradiction from exiftool: it's showing you a rounded value. Try giving it the -n flag, to disable what exiftool calls "print conversion": $ exiftool -n -ScaleFactor35efl sample.jpg Scale Factor To 35 mm Equivalent: 0....


8

Finding the differences is easy. Other answers have already listed them thoroughly, so I will simply refer you to the specification comparison between the Canon EOS 6D and 5D Mark II. To decide between any cameras, you have to go over the differences and give them value according to your needs. The more similar they are, the easier it is, so in this case ...


8

The three primary contributors of blur and/or softness in most pictures are: Camera motion Subject motion Incorrect focus Additional contributing factors can be: Narrow Depth of Field Diffraction Use of tilt/shift with a capable lens Chromatic Aberration Lens Distortion Misaligned/Decentered lens elements Misaligned lens mounting flange Poor lens design/...


7

I'll try to keep my post unbiased and stick to the facts. All of this information is currently based on the spec sheets and what we know from hands on usage of current DSLRs. The 6D has yet to have any public reviews, so any discussion of the AF or ISO performance is not yet based on lab tests of a production copy of the body. This is important to understand,...


7

The Canon EOS 5D Mark III is an awesome camera and so is the 5D Mark II. The $1300 price difference you quote is obviously significant but what is it worth to you is personal. The first thing to note in the specification is that the 5D Mark III has a 100% coverage viewfinder. This is worth at least half the difference in price and the reason I would never ...


7

The bigger the pixels, the less noise there is. This is a matter of physics. More light gets accumulated in each pixel and so it take more noise to appear significant. The 600D and 7D have APS-C sensors which are small and have a high megapixels count. This makes their pixels comparatively smaller than the 5D Mark II which has a larger sensor and hence ...


7

That is any easy thing to found out :) Just compare the cameras. Here I've done it for you. As you can see there are several differences. 22 MP vs 21 MP which is really pretty much the same and so is 0.2" difference in LCD size. What is much more significant: The 5D Mark III has a 100% coverage viewfinder. With the Mark II you can never see exactly what ...


7

This is a very common issue with the 5D series. You have accidentally locked the rear control-dial. The power-switch next to it has actually 3 positions. When lined up with On, the camera is on but the rear control-dial is disabled. When lined up with the white line which goes to that dial, the camera is on and the dial is enabled.


6

To me this sounds like the Mirror Lockup custom function setting. When using a tripod this is useful as it first locks up the mirror to avoid the shake from that as the picture is taken, allowing the camera to be as still as physically possible when the second click opens the shutter (assuming you use a cable release). This can be turned off in the menu ...


6

Matt covered it pretty well. I wanted to comment but run out of room... I am also deciding between the two but I will not make any move until I see a few full "hands-on" reviews of the production model. I also think the $2100 price point is a bit too high so I might wait until the price drops a bit. Was hoping for sub 2K as the rumors were suggesting prior ...


6

I've just got my camera back from repair and this was apparently caused by water damage to the DC-DC board, an expensive repair but I hope that my camera will now work well for some time to come! I've not yet worked out how the water got in - but I'm suspecting a damp camera bag after a seaside shoot.


6

Blur and softness can easily be confused. If the camera is truly stable and subjects stationary, there can still be softness which looks like blur. With most - more so on low-quality ones - lenses, you will get softness at maximum aperture and with all lenses you will get softness past the diffraction limit which cause blur at small apertures. If you are ...


6

With the Canon EOS 5D mark II, the best way to accomplish what you want is to set the exposure mode to Tv, the shutter speed to the desired setting (i.e. 1/125 sec.), and the ISO to Auto. As long as the light is fairly dim, the camera will first open the aperture to the lens' maximum and then start raising the ISO. This method will only work if you are happy ...


6

The 5D mk2 was released in 2008, the mk3 in 2012, 4 years is a long time in technology. The mk3 is much better, it is better because of 4 years of sensor technology research, the pixel size makes a difference only if everything else is the same - and when you compare a models that have a 4 years difference everything isn't even close to the same. If you ...


6

As from discussion with Per Olso Norway this can happen because of few reasons Setting in the export in LR (see image below) Software, used to upload image strip EXIF information. Original Flickr Uploadr do not do it Some other software in the workflow (xnview for example: Tools->Metadata->Clear)


6

With many of Canon's advanced series of DSLRs (e.g. 5D Mark III, 7D Mark II), it would be possible that the Depth of Field Preview button has been remapped to perform some other function. But the 5D Mark II has no custom function setting in the menu that allows remapping of the DoF Preview button to do something else. When you press the DoF Preview button ...


6

I tend to equate shutter click counts with car mileage. To me, your question's equivalent car shopping question is: Would you buy a 2008/2009 used car with 120,000 miles on it for 1/5 of what it went for new? You may also want to look at this website: The graph is based on a survey from 5DMkII owners, who navigated to the site themselves, about when ...


6

You expected it to be better because people tend to think, bigger = better. People talk about how great full frame is without understanding what is really different, and your expectations are too great. Sensitivity and Noise Full-frame sensors have larger sensels than crop sensors that produce the same number of megapixels. For sensors of the same ...


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