20

I can not imagine damage that would impact focusing without visible damage to the packaging or the camera. These things are pretty sturdy. you would have to damage the mirror or shutter box to really have an impact. So I suspect user error. These images appear to be in focus, but perhaps not where the photographer expected. I see areas in focus in both. ...


11

If you shoot under 400iso and don't print large, you won't notice much difference in the image quality. If you shoot higher ISOs, the Mk II has less noise. Practically speaking, the screen on the MK I is the most annoying thing if you're used to the MK II. Colour accuracy and sharpness during playback are poor compared to the MKII and newer cameras- and far ...


11

The maximum frame rates are just that - maximum frame rates. There are several things that will reduce the maximum frame rate. High ISO The higher the ISO you have selected, the slower the frame rate will be. Noise Reduction the stronger the in-camera noise reduction selected, the slower the frame rate will be. AI Servo Mode If you are using AI Servo AF ...


9

I think you should, in fact, use the slightly-smaller value. That's not because I've measured, but because I can resolve the apparent contradiction from exiftool: it's showing you a rounded value. Try giving it the -n flag, to disable what exiftool calls "print conversion": $ exiftool -n -ScaleFactor35efl sample.jpg Scale Factor To 35 mm Equivalent: 0....


7

This is a very common issue with the 5D series. You have accidentally locked the rear control-dial. The power-switch next to it has actually 3 positions. When lined up with On, the camera is on but the rear control-dial is disabled. When lined up with the white line which goes to that dial, the camera is on and the dial is enabled.


7

I tend to equate shutter click counts with car mileage. To me, your question's equivalent car shopping question is: Would you buy a 2008/2009 used car with 120,000 miles on it for 1/5 of what it went for new? You may also want to look at this website: The graph is based on a survey from 5DMkII owners, who navigated to the site themselves, about when their ...


7

You expected it to be better because people tend to think, bigger = better. People talk about how great full frame is without understanding what is really different, and your expectations are too great. Sensitivity and Noise Full-frame sensors have larger sensels than crop sensors that produce the same number of megapixels. For sensors of the same ...


6

As from discussion with Per Olso Norway this can happen because of few reasons Setting in the export in LR (see image below) Software, used to upload image strip EXIF information. Original Flickr Uploadr do not do it Some other software in the workflow (xnview for example: Tools->Metadata->Clear)


6

The 5D mk2 was released in 2008, the mk3 in 2012, 4 years is a long time in technology. The mk3 is much better, it is better because of 4 years of sensor technology research, the pixel size makes a difference only if everything else is the same - and when you compare a models that have a 4 years difference everything isn't even close to the same. If you ...


6

With many of Canon's advanced series of DSLRs (e.g. 5D Mark III, 7D Mark II), it would be possible that the Depth of Field Preview button has been remapped to perform some other function. But the 5D Mark II has no custom function setting in the menu that allows remapping of the DoF Preview button to do something else. When you press the DoF Preview button ...


5

Just wanted to add to this thread in case my solution can help anyone else. I just had a similar issue, occasionally got an Error 80 when powering up. I would get no display with any of my cards in, but if I took the card out my display would start up again, but obviously I couldn't take any photos. As soon as I put a card in, the display wouldn't work ...


5

The main benefits of the 5D MkII over the 5D MkI include: Addition of ISO 3200 and 6400 native ISOs 21MP over 13MP Addition of dust reduction features New menus and interface Vignetting correction built in AF Micro Adjustment 98% viewfinder instead of 96% Higher resolution larger LCD screen Live view for composition Twice the battery capacity/frames per ...


5

First, we need to understand that your battery will lose some of its charge even when stored outside of your camera. This is what is referred to as "self discharge" or "shelf life." Rechargeable batteries tend to self-discharge at faster rates than their non-rechargeable alkaline counterparts. Historically, rechargeable Lithium Ion (Li-ion) batteries are ...


5

I have not shot manually... but this is not the time or place to try and rectify that. Well, it kind of is, because setting exposure manually will give you the best chance to get the shots you want. The only way to get comfortable shooting in Manual exposure mode is to shoot in Manual exposure mode. But you need to practice it before a big gig. If you are ...


4

Assuming you mean a 5D MK II (spelt with a capital i not a 1), Menu -> "first tab" (in red) -> Quality -> shutter wheel to set RAW to "none" and aperture wheel to set JEPG. (Must have on button in the correct place, might work with the joystick too.) BUT I would HIGHLY recommend to always shoot RAW. Some groups apparently need the fast JPEG (e.g. ...


4

Although it does not exactly answer your question, this article is really useful to understand what you can do when you have 2+ stops of additional DR available: Nikon vs Canon Dynamic Range It compares a Canon 6D (print DR according to DxOMark=12.1; the author selected this one because it is the Canon camera with higher DR) with a Nikon D800 (print DR ...


4

Let me start by saying there isn't a wrong answer. Either camera you suggested is a HUGE improvement over an entry level model and you are jumping pretty much clean over the mid-range models. I personally jumped from an xTi (400D) to a 5D Mark iii, but I made that large of a jump because I was starting commercial photography work on the side. I know you ...


4

The original Canon EF 24-70mm f/2.8 L is sharpest at the plane of focus at 24mm and f/2.8 when tested on a Canon 5D Mark II. Stopping down yields very little increase in center sharpness and results in slightly softer mid-frames and corners (at the absolute point of focus.). As you move from 24mm to 70mm the edges get progressively softer. Of course at f/2.8 ...


4

About the only thing you have not tried that might help is to update/reinstall the firmware for your 5D Mark II. The last version listed at Canon USA's support page for the 5D Mark II is version 2.1.2 There are instructions that become visible when you click the "select" box for the listing of version 2.1.2. They tell you how to download the zip file, ...


4

I've taken some great images with my 5D Mark II. But I've also taken some great images with a Rebel XTi/400D. I've also found that it is easier to get great images and to get more of them in certain situations with a 5D Mark III and the improvements it has over the 5D Mark II than it was to get them with the 5DII. I still use my 5D Mark II regularly, but ...


4

It sounds like some kind of issue with the digic chip itself. Since things were working after the install of ML for a while, I doubt ML was the source of the problem. I don't know if it is the same for the 5D Mark ii, but I know that on my 5D Mark iii, the shutter actuation and image capture is distinct from the menu system itself as I had an issue with ...


4

You're comparing an older (2008) full-frame camera to a newer (2011) crop body, so if you expect an improvement by moving backwards a generation, you're probably in for some disappointment. If you can find a used 6D (2012), you'll be a lot happier in terms of image quality than with a 5D Mk II, because the improvement in sensors over those four years was ...


3

First of all, I always recommend a card reader instead of a direct USB connection. It will be faster, you don't need special software, and it doesn't use your battery while downloading. I prefer the current USB 3.0 readers but many options exist. This looks like what you are looking for: GNU Canon Camera Utilities - http://canoncam.sourceforge.net/ I wish ...


3

There are many reasons any given camera's images can become less sharp over time. I doubt you're going to get a solid confirmation, as it would be incredibly difficult to isolate this from other sources of sharpness reduction/variation, outside of perhaps a DxOMark laboratory (with controlled conditions, several brand new cameras, known-good lenses, etc). ...


3

You say the 550D is happily serving all your needs and that you're only looking to upgrade because "it is time". May I suggest keep your 550D. It's a great camera by all means and you're already enjoying it. You can put the money you were going to spend on the camera (both that you mention would set you back more than a thousand pounds) and instead invest ...


3

If the top of camera LCD display and viewfinder are showing [30"] (without the brackets) the selected shutter speed is 30 seconds which is the same as one-half minute. For shutter speeds slower than 30 seconds you will need to use Bulb mode (B on the Mode Dial) and time the shot with a watch or use a cable release with a built in timer. If the display in ...


3

I don't know why you think you get more natural colours in Av mode. Back in the film days, people would underexpose for that purpose, but as long as you don't overexpose, colours will be fine. If you have a preference for shutter speed, then Tv mode is just for you. If you want to get underexposed pictures (for whatever reason), then there is exposure ...


3

In automatic modes the scale is not displaying exposure. It's instead showing you the amount of exposure compensation you have dialled in. Only in manual mode does it actually work like an exposure meter. So if your exposure compensation is set to zero the meter will not move at all. The meter reading is fluctuating in the automatic modes. It's just not ...


3

As you wrote that “it works correctly in both AV and TV modes”, where only one value is changed at a time, the following might work: In full manual mode (»M«), to change the shutter speed, you use the rotating dial on the top right of the camera whereas for the aperture, you use the large dial to the right of the display. To be able to use that dial, the on-...


3

No, it is not possible. That is because to use the self timer you must select one of the two Self-timer drive modes. To shoot bursts you must select the Continuous drive mode. You may only select one drive mode at a time, so you must choose one or the other. The same is true with a wireless remote, since that also requires using one of the Self-timer drive ...


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