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59

Actually 1/125 is half of 1/60, ±0.06 f-stop. It should be obvious by looking at shutter speeds that they were chosen to be the reciprocal of nice round numbers. Start with 1 second and keep dividing it by 2. Note that you missed the discrepancy between 1/16 s and 1/15 s. If you kept going in strict mathematical multiples of 2, then 1/60 s should ...


51

From what I see this is element from the shutter. And my humble advise is to send your camera to repair shop, give it in to the hands of professional, do not try to repair it.


35

The difference between the "actual" shutter speeds at powers of 2 (32, 16, 8, 4, 2, 1, 1/2, 1/4, 1/8, 1/16, 1/32, 1/64, 1/128, 1/256, 1/512, 1/1024, etc.) and the rounded numbers we use (30, 15, 8, 4, 2, 1, 1/2, 1/4, 1/8, 1/15, 1/30, 1/60, 1/125, 1/250, 1/500, 1/1000, etc.) is so trivial as to be beyond the limits of the vast majority of cameras in existence ...


25

Shutters are probably more accurate/reliable now, but more importantly with digital photography you get instant feedback so you can tell right away if there are any exposure problems, you're not going to ruin several rolls of film before you find out. I had a 1DsII that had a shutter which suddenly became unreliable at anything faster than 1/500s, I ...


23

As was said, the mechanical shutter has speed limitations. As to the slit, try to imagine without it. Suppose the shutter opens by moving from top to bottom of frame. And then of course, it has to close from bottom to top. So it is open longer on the top side than on the bottom side, which is uneven exposure. Modern fast curtains might move about 7 ...


21

Quiet mode slows down the motion of the mirror when it goes up and delays it going back down until the shutter-release is released. Normally the mirror going up and down is the loudest noise the camera makes. So slowing it down causes a longer shutter-lag but makes less noise. Also, the mirror normally comes back down immediately after a shot is taken so ...


21

Thought experiment time. Assume we'd like a minimum exposure of 1/2000 of a second (500 microseconds) on a 35mm full frame camera. We have a single 'shutter' to move out of the way, and back. We'll tolerate one side of the picture being 10% more exposed than the other, so that means we allow 50μs to move the shutter back and forth. So the shutter has to ...


21

The item obstructing the sensor is a shutter blade. Your shutter has failed and needs to be replaced. There's no hack or DYI solution for this problem. This is a hardware problem and not something that can be fixed with software or some kind of hack. You should expect repairs to be in the $200+ price range. Since you can buy a used XTi for under $150, ...


19

Silent shooting mode normally (*please see the end of the answer for a notable exception) does not affect Image Quality in any way. Rather, it affects the way your 5D mk III cycles the mirror and shutter curtain for each shot you take. When shooting via the viewfinder: The Silent mode single option uses a slower speed to move the mirror up out of the light ...


18

The shutter you hear is a mechanical shutter and it cannot on a DSLR move fast enough to shoot at video speeds which is between 24 and 60 FPS. High-end mechanical shutters usually top at 12 FPS. The shutter used in video and high-speed drive on some cameras is an electronic shutter. There are no moving parts involved and hence no sound. The sensor simply ...


18

The camera is likely setting the shutter speed to match the flash sync speed of the camera. If it was set any faster, you would get black bands of underexposure across your shots, or at the fastest speeds a completely black shot. This is because the shutters would have finished moving to some degree before the flash completed its fire.


18

Most DLSRs with "silent" or "quiet" shutter modes don't change the speed at which the shutter is operated at all. The transit time each curtain takes to traverse the height of the sensor is constant regardless of the exposure time (shutter speed) selected or if a "quiet" mode is selected. Exposure time is determined by the time difference between the ...


18

You are correct that the image is inverted as it is projected on the sensor and that the mechanical shutter reveals the bottom of the scene before the top of the scene. What you have missed is that the image (with the shadow of the cork falling on the red shirt at a later time than the the actual cork is seen flying through the air) is not a still frame ...


18

Mirrorless or DSLR doesn't really matter. Use whichever lens-body combination gives you the best reduction of vibrations that are relatively slow in frequency but very deep in amplitude. Smaller bodies/lenses will catch less wind, but larger bodies have more mass which helps with the vibration coming from the helicopter body to which you are strapped. One ...


16

The original cameras didn't use film at all, so there was no noise from any film advance mechanism. Instead they used materials that were inserted in the back of what we now refer to as view cameras while being protected from exposure to light. Each image required changing out the entire back of the camera and replacing it with another glass plate that had ...


16

Rolling shutter looks like the most obvious answer but I'd say it is a red herring. With rolling shutter the cyclists would not be cut in half as they are, they would be bent or warped through their full length, all of which would be in the frame. As would other objects in the frame. The wheels would also show signs of extreme geometric distortion in the ...


16

Calibrating your Shutter Speed Unless you are performing photographic telemetry or a variety of other niche scientific measurements, the only reason to know the exact length of your exposure is to achieve accurate exposure. Although it is rare for a modern camera's shutter to drift by a stop or more and still continue to function, old war horses with spring ...


15

For changing the shutter speed, put the mode dial on Tv (as in the image below: make sure the white line corresponds to the letters Tv ), and turn the wheel high-lighted in red below (excuse my crappy images, I edited all this as something quick and dirty). On your LCD screen, you can see the below screen (let me know if you don't know how to get to this ...


14

The rolling shutter is a method of image capture which is not by taking a snapshot of the entire scene at single instant in time, but rather by scanning across the scene rapidly (vertically or horizontally). The implications of using a rolling shutter can produce predictable distortions of fast-moving objects or rapid flashes of light such as wobble (jello ...


14

The biggest functional difference between a leaf shutter and a focal plane shutter is the ability of a focal plane shutter to precisely allow the same amount of exposure time for the entire field of light collected at the front of the lens and to allow the practical use of faster shutter speeds. Due to the fact that leaf shutters are open in the center ...


13

In most scenarios the extra stop between 1/4000 and 1/8000 second will make very little difference in terms of freezing motion. 1/4000 will freeze all but the fastest objects you are likely to encounter, and even 1/2000 will freeze world class human athletes and most animals at typical shooting distances. Where the extra stop will come in handy is when you ...


12

Yes, the A77 has a mechanical shutter and it does move at 12 FPS per second. There are a number of cameras with similar shutter-speeds including some ultra-zooms but indeed this is very fast. What it does not have is a motor to move the mirror. This is more problematic for speed then the shutter itself since a mirror is heavy and has to move out of the way ...


11

The Canon 600D uses a mechanical shutter, and it does indeed go up to 1/4000th rate. There is no "electronic" shutter in Canon DSLR's that I know of. You pretty much nailed it on the head with your 'ps'...the two shutter curtains race over the sensor with a tiny slit (see 'Focal plane shutter, high speed' figure), with the second curtain a minuscule fraction ...


11

This is called "Bulb Mode". On most DSLRs (including the D5100), you would change to shutter priority or manual mode and slide the shutter speed larger until it reads "Bulb" or something of the sort.


11

I don't know medium format cameras, but in general shutter latency is the time that it takes from when you push the shutter to the time the shutter actually activates. The lower the latency, the more responsive the shutter, but the less time the camera has to make last minute adjustments or changes in hardware state. A higher shutter latency will allow the ...


11

The shutter sync is limited simply by how fast the shutter can move in the same way there is a limit to how high a car engine can rev. Increasing these limits increases the demands placed on materials, design and longevity. Another limit is the distance the shutter must travel (which is determined by the size of the sensor, a full frame shutter has to ...


11

The shutter is closed by default on film cameras because if it was open it would have exposed the film while the camera is not in use - it's simply this way because there's no other choice. In mirrorless cameras, the shutter must be open when the camera is on but not taking pictures because otherwise the camera can't show an image on the screen or digital ...


10

I'm familiar with Canon lenses featuring Image Stabilization that can emit a faint "whir" as IS operates. Your Sony body has a form of image stabilization built into the body, and if that's on during a long exposure, you might be hearing that as it operates. If you're shooting long-exposure shots with the camera mounted on a tripod (which would be best), ...


10

I do own a 1100D and don't find the mirror noise so loud. In Live View, the mirror is up, so that would explain the lower noise when you take the picture. My advice would be to go to a shop and compare the noise with the 1100D that is on display. IF it is the same, then your ears may just be too sensitive. If it isn't, then head out to the service center and ...


10

This is very likely the result of an automatic HDR mode. Because of the apparent high contrast of the scene, the camera app tried to blend multiple pictures of the scene with different exposures together. Due to the fast movements in the scene, not all of these source pictures contained the cyclist, and so it's only visible in parts. I know from ...


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