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61

Actually 1/125 is half of 1/60, ±0.06 f-stop. It should be obvious by looking at shutter speeds that they were chosen to be the reciprocal of nice round numbers. Start with 1 second and keep dividing it by 2. Note that you missed the discrepancy between 1/16 s and 1/15 s. If you kept going in strict mathematical multiples of 2, then 1/60 s should ...


50

From what I see this is element from the shutter. And my humble advise is to send your camera to repair shop, give it in to the hands of professional, do not try to repair it.


35

The difference between the "actual" shutter speeds at powers of 2 (32, 16, 8, 4, 2, 1, 1/2, 1/4, 1/8, 1/16, 1/32, 1/64, 1/128, 1/256, 1/512, 1/1024, etc.) and the rounded numbers we use (30, 15, 8, 4, 2, 1, 1/2, 1/4, 1/8, 1/15, 1/30, 1/60, 1/125, 1/250, 1/500, 1/1000, etc.) is so trivial as to be beyond the limits of the vast majority of cameras in existence ...


25

Shutters are probably more accurate/reliable now, but more importantly with digital photography you get instant feedback so you can tell right away if there are any exposure problems, you're not going to ruin several rolls of film before you find out. I had a 1DsII that had a shutter which suddenly became unreliable at anything faster than 1/500s, I ...


23

As was said, the mechanical shutter has speed limitations. As to the slit, try to imagine without it. Suppose the shutter opens by moving from top to bottom of frame. And then of course, it has to close from bottom to top. So it is open longer on the top side than on the bottom side, which is uneven exposure. Modern fast curtains might move about 7 ...


21

Thought experiment time. Assume we'd like a minimum exposure of 1/2000 of a second (500 microseconds) on a 35mm full frame camera. We have a single 'shutter' to move out of the way, and back. We'll tolerate one side of the picture being 10% more exposed than the other, so that means we allow 50μs to move the shutter back and forth. So the shutter has to ...


21

The item obstructing the sensor is a shutter blade. Your shutter has failed and needs to be replaced. There's no hack or DYI solution for this problem. This is a hardware problem and not something that can be fixed with software or some kind of hack. You should expect repairs to be in the $200+ price range. Since you can buy a used XTi for under $150, ...


20

Fujifilm has a nice summary of the issues with each. Electronic Shutters (ES) have some interesting characteristics due to the way the image is read out of the sensor. Moving objects can be distorted, fluorescent/LED lights can leave light and dark bands across the frame, and ES can't usually be used with flash. On the plus side ES can have very high shutter ...


18

Most DLSRs with "silent" or "quiet" shutter modes don't change the speed at which the shutter is operated at all. The transit time each curtain takes to traverse the height of the sensor is constant regardless of the exposure time (shutter speed) selected or if a "quiet" mode is selected. Exposure time is determined by the time difference between the ...


18

You are correct that the image is inverted as it is projected on the sensor and that the mechanical shutter reveals the bottom of the scene before the top of the scene. What you have missed is that the image (with the shadow of the cork falling on the red shirt at a later time than the the actual cork is seen flying through the air) is not a still frame ...


18

Mirrorless or DSLR doesn't really matter. Use whichever lens-body combination gives you the best reduction of vibrations that are relatively slow in frequency but very deep in amplitude. Smaller bodies/lenses will catch less wind, but larger bodies have more mass which helps with the vibration coming from the helicopter body to which you are strapped. One ...


16

The original cameras didn't use film at all, so there was no noise from any film advance mechanism. Instead they used materials that were inserted in the back of what we now refer to as view cameras while being protected from exposure to light. Each image required changing out the entire back of the camera and replacing it with another glass plate that had ...


16

Rolling shutter looks like the most obvious answer but I'd say it is a red herring. With rolling shutter the cyclists would not be cut in half as they are, they would be bent or warped through their full length, all of which would be in the frame. As would other objects in the frame. The wheels would also show signs of extreme geometric distortion in the ...


16

Calibrating your Shutter Speed Unless you are performing photographic telemetry or a variety of other niche scientific measurements, the only reason to know the exact length of your exposure is to achieve accurate exposure. Although it is rare for a modern camera's shutter to drift by a stop or more and still continue to function, old war horses with spring ...


14

The rolling shutter is a method of image capture which is not by taking a snapshot of the entire scene at single instant in time, but rather by scanning across the scene rapidly (vertically or horizontally). The implications of using a rolling shutter can produce predictable distortions of fast-moving objects or rapid flashes of light such as wobble (jello ...


14

In most scenarios the extra stop between 1/4000 and 1/8000 second will make very little difference in terms of freezing motion. 1/4000 will freeze all but the fastest objects you are likely to encounter, and even 1/2000 will freeze world class human athletes and most animals at typical shooting distances. Where the extra stop will come in handy is when you ...


14

The biggest functional difference between a leaf shutter and a focal plane shutter is the ability of a focal plane shutter to precisely allow the same amount of exposure time for the entire field of light collected at the front of the lens and to allow the practical use of faster shutter speeds. Due to the fact that leaf shutters are open in the center ...


11

The shutter sync is limited simply by how fast the shutter can move in the same way there is a limit to how high a car engine can rev. Increasing these limits increases the demands placed on materials, design and longevity. Another limit is the distance the shutter must travel (which is determined by the size of the sensor, a full frame shutter has to ...


11

The shutter is closed by default on film cameras because if it was open it would have exposed the film while the camera is not in use - it's simply this way because there's no other choice. In mirrorless cameras, the shutter must be open when the camera is on but not taking pictures because otherwise the camera can't show an image on the screen or digital ...


10

This is very likely the result of an automatic HDR mode. Because of the apparent high contrast of the scene, the camera app tried to blend multiple pictures of the scene with different exposures together. Due to the fast movements in the scene, not all of these source pictures contained the cyclist, and so it's only visible in parts. I know from experience ...


9

From the horse's mouth... A quote from Jim Reekes, creator of the Mac startup & camera sounds [amongst other things] from his own site - The Story of Sosumi and the Mac Startup Sound One of the other sounds I created for the Mac is the one you hear when you take a screen shot (press Cmd-Shift-3). This is also more well-known as the sound you ...


8

Yeah, that is definitely a dodgy shutter. On the Leica-like Canon 7, it is a pair of metal shutter curtains (instead of the classic Leica cloth curtains) that move horizontally across the frame,. If the timing is off on one or both, it can have this effect. If you are lucky, it is just old gunky lubricant that is the culprit. I guess you will have to bite ...


8

I have been doing this stuff since the 1950’s, I have never actually seen damage to a camera due to the springs taking a set due to prolonged cocking. Not to say that can’t happen as I was taught not to leave springs cocked for extended durations (storage). In my opinion, you can safely use photo equipment paying little attention to how you leave the springs....


8

The reason for the phenomenon is that at wide apertures in good light necessitating a fast shutter speed, most of the exposure is coming from a very narrow traveling slit between the first and second curtain. The curtains before and after the slit are not at the same height, however. The electronic curtain travels where the photosites are. The mechanical ...


7

Put it in Manual (M) mode and roll the wheel until it shows 'Bulb' on the display. Press and hold the shutter button for the desired length of time. You don't need a remote, but it helps to prevent camera shake to a great extent. P.S. The manual is your friend.


7

On the screen at the back of the camera, a preview is constantly shown. I assume this preview is made by light hitting the sensor constantly. So this must require the shutter/aperture to be permanently open. Correct. This puts the sensor into what's called "Live view" mode which is effectively the mode it takes video in. Data is constantly being read from ...


7

Yes, you are right, the effect is opposite from what we would expect from a shutter moving downwards. And this is because the shutter moved upwards, or, more specifically, it was the electronic shutter so nothing really moved, but the image data was being read from top to the bottom of the image (which corresponds to the bottom-to-top of the image sensor). ...


7

One problem with electronic shutter is that it's sometimes combined with mechanical shutter, so that there's electronic first curtain (simple to implement, just gradually release the photosites at the same rate the second mechanical curtain would move) and mechanical second curtain. This results in odd-shaped background blur. Pure electronic shutter today ...


6

In cameras that have a mechanical shutter, which are the only cameras I am aware of with shutter durability ratings, the answer is, "Yes, using Live view will increase the number of shutter actuations." This is because the shutter does not normally stay open continuously on such cameras when shooting in Live View. What happens when you press the button to ...


6

I'm a little surprised that nobody knows this, but the shutter speeds shown on cameras are simply the result of convention. There were two different conventions until about 1939, but that is beside the point. Back in the days of mechanical cameras, repairmen had a simple device that could be used to determine the actual shutter speed of a camera. They ...


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