2

Maybe. Maybe not. Frame rates in some cameras can be "throttled" somewhat. This allows camera makers to use common parts for models with performance that is differentiated by price in their product lines. But other cameras can also already be at the hardware limits of the motors moving things such as mirrors and shutter curtains. In the first case it might ...


2

Phil Harvey (author of exiftool) keeps a collection of metadata examples from many cameras/scanners/etc. The files all have the image data stripped away and just include the metadata. Scanning through my older local copy of that, it shows 196 files (out of over 6,000) that include SubSecTimeOriginal. The list includes Apple, Canon, Kodak, Nikon, Nokia, ...


1

Any kind of focus tracking ("AI focus" and the like) requires the camera to refocus between shots, and focusing requires the lens to be fully open. Also, you can use your DoF test button with aperture set to something small (f/16..) to see how the image looks like when the diaphragm is closed, and you will observe that this is a lot dimmer than what you ...


1

For an SLR, moving the aperture blades will be a lot less effort than moving the mirror. So I doubt that there is a universal answer independent of camera model.


1

Most of the other answers are perfectly valid. Another aspect to be considered is that -each- of the frames can be sold individually and exclusively to different buyers. You are selling the image, not the event.


1

Question: Why exactly do action photographers "need" high fps burst cameras? Answer: In order to shoot as many photos as possible in a given amount of time and/or to reduce the time between shutter actuation's. Sometimes in fast action sports or high speed animals the moment you want to capture happens at the same moment the camera is resetting the ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible