19

DXOMark primary "scores" are utterly useless. IGNORE THEM. It is a futile effort to try and reduce a complex entity such as a DSLR to a single, scalar number that tells you everything about it. It's a fallacy. There are too many factors to consider, and which factors are most important for a given photographer differ. A single score entirely defeats the ...


12

Overall Score I generally ignore the Overall Score, as it's way too general if you understand any of the individual scores. The Overall Score is a function of a variety of (fairly) deterministic tests, each of which is quite informative, and most (if not all?) have clear units of measurement. But then they generate a "score" that combines these ...


11

Full frame and APS-H cameras For general information and APS-C cameras, see the answer above. Canon EOS 6D All points function to f/5.6. The center point is cross-type, and all other points are single-line. The center point is high-precision cross-type with f/2.8 or faster lenses (but is not dual cross-type as it does not have diagonal-line sensors). ...


10

My simplified diagram of camera I/O: |―――――――\ ] \ /----> | CARD 1 | |――――――――――| |―――――――――――――――| |――――――――――――――| | | | | | | ...


9

They're two totally different designs that just happen to be the same (nominal) focal length and apertures. The New FD 50mm f/1.2 L debuted in 1980 with 8 elements in 6 groups. As with all FD lenses, it was manual focus. It was very similar, but not optically identical, to the older FD 55mm f/1.2 from 1971. Both are based on double Gauss¹ designs that have ...


8

Two batteries in parallel at the same voltage can supply more current than one of them alone can. If we were talking about car or truck engines we would say we have twice as much torque (current) at the same RPM (voltage). Therefore the same load will not cause the same drop in voltage when two of the same batteries are in parallel. This also means a greater ...


8

This kind of fast then slow performance (as you correctly guessed) will be because of the image buffer filling up. Using a faster card will help until you reach the limit of the camera's circuitry - you may have reached this limit. Even if your camera's performance is faster than the SD card. It's quite possible that some of the card's 'bandwidth' is taken ...


8

Given that the RF design has three aspherical elements and one UD (ultra-low dispersion glass) element (overall, 15 elements in 9 groups) and the old FD design only has one aspherical element (overall, 8 elements in 6 groups, one floating element), I think you can assume there's a lot more aberration correction going on, particularly for chromatic aberration....


5

There are two main things I can think of, the first is the autofocus. On a DSLR, the mirror reflects light on to a Phase Detect Auto Focus sensor while you are looking in the view finder. While PDAF isn't as accurate as contrast based detection (which can be done with a standard CMOS sensor) it is much faster. Since mirrorless lack the mirror, they ...


5

My answer: disk! Just some real world observation: I am a user of both Lightroom and Photoshop and recently upgraded from a 4 year old high-end Acer desktop to now a massive Alienware desktop with the ultra powerful GTX960 video card. Note that I do not have this high-end desktop for Photoshop, but still, there is no visible performance improvement in ...


4

Are you wondering about the distinct list of keywords in an entire catalog or are you wondering about the number of keywords for a single image? I am doubtful that there is any practical limit to the number of keywords allowed in a Lightroom catalog. It wouldn't make sense to have an artificial limit in the software itself but it is possible. Lightroom is ...


4

As the camera theoretically has to make the double amount of writes, is there a performance impact? (especially whilst shooting RAW continuous and filling the buffer). There almost always is a performance penalty. How significant it is can vary widely from one camera model to the next. The only exception would be if both slots support the same type of card, ...


4

Bob Parent's first camera that he used in the jazz clubs of New York was a 4x5 Speed Graphic. It is also known that when he first started, he used a flash held in his left hand as far off camera as he could reach. Although most photographers who used flash with a Speed Graphic had it attached to the side of the camera, the flash was triggered by an external ...


4

In general, lens design is the one thing that has really got better in the last 30 years or so. Modern lenses are designed by getting computers to do the experiments that are needed after the lens designer has done the basic calculations. The computer can rapidly iterate the parameters, optimising for low dispersion, low distortion and focal plane accuracy ...


4

I like Michael's answer, but I don't see anyone mention the different flange focal distances of the two systems. The lenses obviously need different optical formulas because they project light rays out the rear of the lens in different ways, in order to focus their image on the respectively near or faraway focal plane.


3

For the amount of spot removals I did, I believe I should have used Photoshop instead: The Spot Removal Tool and Local Corrections Brush are not designed for hundreds to thousands of corrections. If your image contains many (hundreds) of localized adjustments, consider using a pixel-based editing application such as Photoshop for that level of correction. ...


3

It can. As usual with computers, you get the most significant benefits by improving the slowest path. A modern SSD is considerably faster than rotating disk, so the potential for speed up is huge. I know this from personal experience, having a system with quite a few SSDs, plus several external ones. When not using full-previews, Lightroom needs the ...


3

Your question isn't correctly written. I'll try to untangle it, tough. You cannot say that till "n" keywords you won't get any performance degradation and from "n"+1 (ok, "n"+100 or whatever) you suddenly will feel it. The performance degradation is a quite incremental process. It is rather an oblique line and not a stair-like graph. Also, of course, it ...


3

In my experience it doesn't make much difference. The time it takes your computer's CPU to render the image(s) will be much longer than the time it takes to read the file from either type of logical drive. I built my current editing machine about a year ago. It has an 8 core AMD FX-8370 running at 4Ghz, 16GB of DDR3 1600 memory, an AMD Radeon 7200 series ...


3

This is not an answer, just a "comment" to the question about shot-to-shot cycle times when camera is set to single-shot mode. The claim made in the question is that even the slowest DSLRs are faster than the fastest mirrorless cameras in this single-shot mode. Here is some of those cycle times in a list for easy comparing, brought up from the review-site ...


2

I trust DXoMark about as far as I can throw them, and I'm not particularly good at shot put. They are an interesting source of information about lab conditions and can be occasionally useful when comparing cameras from the same manufacturer, but there are too many variables in there tests that depart from real world conditions to make them generally useful ...


2

In windows task manager, you can lower the priority class of the Lightroom process. That will help other processes to get some more CPU time, and quite frankly i think Adobe should have implemented those long running tasks with idle priority anyway, so working interactively could continue as normal. You also can fiddle with CPU affinity of the Lightroom ...


2

Short answer: It can be, depending on what you'll do. Long answer: Usually, from database/storage point of view, the keywords engine is split in two (groups of) tables. Now I'll take in consideration the simplest case with just two tables which will explain pretty clearly (IMHO) the phenomenon. The first (group of) table(s) is the table which holds the ...


2

Modern cameras don't use simple electric motors. Their power is not directly proportional to the voltage provided, it stays the same whatever voltage applied. Reading several sources I can deduce that most cameras do not get a faster shutter speed from the use of the grip. The exception that I found are Nikon cameras which are reported to indeed improve the ...


2

A few versions ago, I had to disable my graphics card because of issues like what you are describing. Under Preferences/Performance there is a check box. Probably not the issue but worth a try. If that does speed things up then check out: https://helpx.adobe.com/lightroom/kb/lightroom-gpu-faq.html and make sure the driver is current: https://helpx.adobe....


2

It might sound silly to you, but my two main reasons for using a grip are these: 1) Better balance and inertia when using big lenses 2) My pinky finger no longer slips off the bottom of the camera


2

The only way to know how a lens and camera body will perform together is to test them together. While a smaller sensor will crop out the edges and corners of the image, which do tend to have poorer image quality (by whatever metric), not all lenses suffer equally from the same problems. A very good lens with good corner and edge sharpness won't see any ...


2

Short Answer You usually gain a bit from cropping out the edges of the image circle.¹ You always lose a bit by increasing the magnification ratio to display the image from a smaller sensor at the same size as you would display the image from a larger sensor. Which way the combination of both together tilts is entirely dependent upon the specific lens, the ...


2

Any drive connected by USB is going to be slow, because USB is a big bottleneck. You could use software which can cache thumbnails to a different directory (geeqie, for example, on Linux) and only open the folder with that. But overall, I think it's a case where the old joke applies: "Doctor, it hurts when I do this...." "Well, don't do that!" Not ...


2

If you're talking about how long it will take your machine to open and display an interpretation of the information in the raw file it's most likely fairly negligible. Of course it would depend on many variables: Image size in terms of numbers of photosites (you don't really have "pixels" until after demosaicing). A 9000 x 6000 pixel image will ...


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