14

The point of bracketing in the context you described is to come up with a higher dynamic range that the one you can get with a single picture because you want or need to do it. Even if RAW has more bits per channel than JPEG, it still have a limited dynamic range. So depending of the scene you have in front of you, you will want or need to take pictures ...


13

There are quite a few advantages. A difficult problem that often arises is blooming of bright areas into adjacent dark areas. So, the overexposed pixels that are in the bright area will leak electrons to adjacent pixels, making them get gray values that are too high. If the contrast is very high, those pixels may be in dark areas. This means that with only ...


11

ISO Bracketing This will create images with different amounts of noise in them. I call this grain, others just call it noise. Depending on the ISO range that you are using, you may or may not cause issues by doing this. Higher in the range, if you combine different areas of a ISO bracketed image you will see different noise profiles throughout and that may ...


11

It all depends on the scene in terms of overall brightness, the total dynamic range, and how fine the graduations are between bright and dark. The wider the difference is between the brightest part and the darkest part of the scene, the further apart your darkest and brightest exposures need to be. The best way to measure this is to use your camera's ...


11

There are usually small variations between images when you shoot a stack for HDR, especially shooting handheld. Wind may cause larger variations, as well as other moving entities within a shot (such as a pedestrian in the distance). Photo editing software is good at dealing with these variations. However, certain items, especially complex/movement-prone ...


9

It could also be used to have different exposure and thus a higher chance of getting it right (you can't see them on screen). But film is also post-processable, though trickier and less flexible. Dodging, burning, even HDR were fairly common techniques in the film era. Just look at the history of HDR on Wikipedia. There is a very nice answer by Michael ...


8

The D5100 can bracket for exposure, which is what I suppose you call true bracketing. Technically this is AEB which stands for Auto-Exposure Bracketing. It can also bracket for WB or Adaptive D-Lighting which is what people refer to as a virtual bracket because the camera takes ONE shot and saves it 3 times, with different WB or Adaptive D-Lighting setting. ...


8

To reply specifically to “Could you maybe add a concrete example of a situation in which I would want to use it?”: You may want to use White Balance bracketing if: you don’t shoot raw or very rarely process raw files, either because you prefer the quick process of shooting JPEG files and not messing much or at all with them, or because you don’t want to ...


8

The use of exposure bracketing for HDR images has obscured it's original purpose, which was to ensure you got as single exposure that is as good as it can be for the scene. Camera light meters are not accurate and handheld units have their limitations. If you can't go back and want to make sure you got the exposure right in at least one shot you could use ...


8

Bracketing is useful when the scene exceeds the dynamic-range of the camera. That is it. There is no answer that applies all the time because it depends on the scene.


8

The user in the video is using a specialised bracketing function on a Canon body, called Auto Exposure Bracketing (AEB) (complete description from Canon here) In the "exposure" setting, you can rotate the dial and then 3 lines will appears. Each line represents the exposure compensation that will occur for the 3 photo that you will take immediately after. ...


7

The best pro trick is to get a good tripod. You will need it here because even with the remote trigger and self-timer you have to touch the camera between exposures. Then go to Manual exposure mode, then: Select the aperture you need Set the focus and and lock it by going into MF mode Set the white-balance to any setting other than Auto (unless shooting ...


7

It is just a software limitation, they could certainly include additional bracketing, but they don't. See Magic Lantern as an option to get beyond this on some Canon DSLR cameras. See this link for Magic Lantern info: http://wiki.magiclantern.fm/userguide#exposure-bracketing Note, the Canon 5D MkIII has: The EOS 5D Mark III's standard Auto Exposure ...


7

What is bracketing? According to 'Bracketing' on Wikipedia, In photography, bracketing is the general technique of taking several shots of the same subject using different camera settings. Bracketing is useful and often recommended in situations that make it difficult to obtain a satisfactory image with a single shot, especially when a small ...


7

Yes, it can - the option you're after is "auto exposure bracketing" (AEB), which can most easily be configured from the quick menu - select the meter (the -3 to +3 scale), press "SET", then turn the control wheel. At this point, the little indicator marker should split into three, which will mean that the next three shots the camera takes will have normal ...


7

If you're going to use HDR techniques, you need a perfectly motionless subject. If there is even the slightest breeze, small tree branches are going to move and will not be in precisely the same location as they were when you shot the other images in your amalgamated photograph. Waiting for a perfectly calm day, avoiding use of HDR techniques, or shooting ...


6

Sure. I think its named AEB (Auto Exposure Bracketing) on the Xsi menu. (On newer models it's Expo.comp/AEB) The Rebel Xsi supports up to -2 and +2. You will have to set your camera to manual or Av (Aperature Priority) as the AEB menu option will not be available under Auto.


6

Yes you can. Refer pg 305 of the standard English manual. Custom function C.Fn I-5 'Number of bracketed shots' 0: 3 shots (default) 1: 2 shots 2: 5 shots 3: 7 shots FYI: C.Fn I-4 lets you change the sequence of brackets shots - this could be useful when creating HDR shots as the order of the photos is from lowest to highest exposure value. 0: 0 - + (...


6

If I assume that the default 0 EV has reasonable exposure, does this mean that the -1 and +1 RAWs are more or less redundant? If the exposure is reasonable in both the shadows and highlights — that is, the scene has a dynamic range that easily fits within what the camera can capture — then yes, you're right. Bracketed exposure doesn't do much for you. Even ...


5

I'm guessing that this would make sense if you were shooting in JPG. That way you could keep the smaller file size of the compressed format while having the flexibility of RAW. Would rather shoot a single RAW file, though. Another option would be to exploit possible wider gamut of different color choices, but then, if you're shooting in raw you can do ...


5

It is simply a software limitation imposed by the manufacturer to drive buyers with more specialized needs to more pricey options. The same is true of other types of bracketing, exposure compensation and other features which require no hardware component. In this particular case you are in luck because a good number of intervalometers can make your camera ...


5

Yes, the EOS 6D DOES support more than three bracketed shots. According to the Canon specs on their own website, a custom function can be set for 2,3,5 or 7 exposures, just like the EOS 1D Mark III and some other EOS models. This is copied from Canon USA web site - http://www.usa.canon.com/cusa/professional/products/professional_cameras/digital_slr_cameras/...


5

The magic lantern custom firmware for the 5D2 offers extended exposure bracketing up to 13 shots, so you don't have to alter any settings part way through. The firmware is loaded from CF card and only lasts until powered down.


5

You are incorrect in the assumption that redundancy is a bad thing. A good HDR tool will be able to average the results of many images to reduce noise. Having more images also reduces the chance that there is movement in one of the images that will impact the result. A few points, DXO also measures dynamic range at each ISO setting. The NEX 5R has 13.1 EVs ...


5

I've found that bracketing by ±1 or ±2EV doesn't help, but bracketing by ±3EV does. I did the following experiment: First, I picked a high dynamic range scene, short of directly shooting the sun. Here, the sun was partially behind thin clouds, and it was uncomfortably bright to look at with the naked eye. In other words, it was much brighter than it looks ...


5

More images will give you better signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), since you will have a good SNR for every absolute brightness value if you do more intermediate steps. The brightest captured parts of the image will have the best SNR and, thus, “details”, it's the same reason for “expose to the right” (see https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Exposing_to_the_right). If ...


5

Three exposures are often enough, and so are two. While there are scenes that need more, you have diminished return for every additional exposure. Consider that a single frame from a modern DSLR can capture at least 10 stops, sometimes over 14, two frames can potentially hold 20+ stops of dynamic range. You need some overlap though so that it can be merged, ...


5

In practice, when the scene has a large dynamic range, you need to take many exposures despite the fact that in theory a few exposures suffice to cover the entire dynamic range. You may want to limit the exposure time for a very dark part of a scene. When shooting with a tripod at night there may be some wind causing unsharpness due to shaking when you ...


5

Take a picture of your left hand. Yes, really. Before you bracket you take a picture of your left hand indicating the number of shots that will be in the bracketing series. What if it's more than 5 shots? Well, use the fist as one number, open back hand as one, open palm as one, take a picture of your feet. It's all up to you. Just don't unzip to make 6. ...


4

I can do it on my Nikon D5000. On the Info screen bottom right select BKT and select AE2.0 then back in the Info screen from release mode select continuous. You can now hold down the shutter for three shots and it will give the 3 shots with 3 exposures for a HDR. It is possible to do some HDRs without a tripod doing this if there is enough light and you hold ...


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