32

Film negatives are only light-sensitive while in the camera, until they are removed and processed. The processing includes a step to "fix" the image so that the negatives will not be further exposed by light. So once processed, film negatives (and slides) can be handled in daylight.


8

The originals were that. The originals. Obviously you tried to keep the negatives in a safe manner because the nitrates and films were very flammable, could being eaten by fungus, decolor, or all kind of things. Even in remastering on movies like Star Wars they went for the original negatives, which were in bad shape. In feature films after the original ...


8

You're be looking for the Sabatier Effect. Sabatier discovered that when a plate was exposed, developed, and washed but not fixed, it could be given a second exposure to light which would partially reverse the image when development was continued. The technique can be used on film or when printing but is more commonly used when printing as the effects ...


7

Questions about the orange mask of the C-41 and earlier C-22 negative color film keep reoccurring. Maybe I can shine some light on this subject. As you know, black & white film photography generates an image by chemically depositing a layer of metallic silver on film. This silver laydown is in proportion to scene brightness. This film thus displays ...


7

The C-41 negative film process arose from movie film that was marketed just after World War II. Previously, processing color films was a far more arduous task. To simplify, three dyes, cyan (blue-green), magenta (red-blue), and yellow are incorporated into the film during manufacture. The dyes in this film is incomplete. The three dyes are all missing the ...


7

Processed film does deteriorate, but not at such a rate that surviving 10-15 years would be remarkable! It also depends on the type of film; black & white film lasts longer than colour film for example. (Indeed, when film studios want to store an old colour movie, they separate the colour film into its R, G and B channels, and record each channel ...


6

Soak in a tray or tube of water at room temperature. Add two teaspoons of Dawn dishwashing detergent per quart (liter). Soak for several hours and test the paper to film adherence. If not free, continue soaking. In time the film will release from the paper. Now wash the film for 10 minutes in running water at room temperature, follow with a 30 second dip in ...


6

It appears you have an intermittent light leak that is reaching the film while it is wound tightly on a spool, possibly the take up spool inside the camera. The distance between the bands in your sample and the differences in intensity look like the same event caused all three at a time when the area with the darkest band was on top and the areas with the ...


5

Talbot bathed paper sheets in a solution of silver nitrate and then potassium iodide. He then “washed” the paper with a mix of gallic acid and silver nitrate. The paper was then exposed in the camera. The exposed paper was bathed again in this wash solution he called “gallo-nitrate of silver”. He then fixed the image (rendered permanent), with a hot solution ...


4

You can but the result will be poor. First of all you need to disable the lighting from below, otherwise what you will get will be the reflection of the surface. Second you need to light the negatives from behind with some source of light that is both known and homogeneous: you don't want to have one side of the negative brighter than the other one. Third ...


4

How was the cyan cast of C-41 negatives originally removed? By applying color correction filters during the enlarging/printing process. Normally a strong yellow filter and a more moderate magenta filter were used. Other ratios between the yellow and magenta filters were used for color correction. For example, if tungsten film was shot in daylight it would ...


4

Here are some differences between paper and film that will affect the image resolution acutance, resolution, and resolving power. Paper: The emulsion normally used for paper is relatively insensitive silver chloride in a colloidal suspension, orthochromatic (blue sensitive), thickly applied to a fibre base with a baryta layer for brightness and a starch ...


4

How important is the quality of the negative for Lightroom processing (Path A) versus conventional printing (Path B)? A good negative is a joy to work with. A bad negative must be salvaged, no matter which path you choose. If wet printing, you may find yourself tediously burning and dodging in order to milk just a tad more highlight detail from your nearly ...


3

I asked B&H and they told me that it's standard 120 size film and recommended the Epson V600. Seems reasonable. Fingers crossed!


3

I filter the orange cast of the color negatives via the light box so that the red channel on the D810 camera I use is not shifted and compressed using 3 sets of gels. My light box is powered with two SB700 flash units and a CFL bulb for focus and composition. I have described my setup twice on this forum before. Here are the gels I use. Cinegel #3202: Full ...


3

I know this is a bit late, but I just stumbled across your question. With the recent updates to Lightroom, you can now build a profile to invert negatives and in many cases no further processing will be needed. But even with a film inversion profile, the sliders are still reversed. I do not think this will ever change because Adobe have explained that ...


3

As said here, the original source will always contain a better quality. But you also have to consider that, the negative is smaller and you need better equipment in order to capture that, with better resolution and better optics. Your scanner may be able to capture more than 2000dpi image, which will give you a lot of pixels even on a inch big negative. ...


3

The image looks like it could have been done in-camera, if the camera had a multiple exposure function. If the camera was tilted down for the first exposure, level for the middle exposure then tilted up for the last, you would achieve the stepped gradient effect we see here. The model looks to have been photographed against an evening sky (or sunset), and ...


3

These are scans of old B&W photographs and I want to convert them to negatives for further photo printings. You don't need negatives to print any more. The best resolution you can possibly get at this stage, without recourse to the original prints or negatives, is the files you already have. Any print-shop can work from these. Take them to a local ...


2

Put them the safest place you can, but even the safest place is never "safe." Remember the Jacques Lowe case? Had extended exclusive access behind the scenes of the Kennedy administration. Put his treasure trove of negs in the toughest vault he could find. In the basement of the World Trade Center.


2

Usually, when scanning film or slides, one uses a scanner that has a built-in backlight, illuminating the film from behind, thus overcoming exactly the problems you describe. Therefore, in order to use "regular" scanners as film scanners, one has to provide backlighting in some way. Here are several things people have tried: Build a "mirrorbox" from ...


2

I would like to send them to scan by a professional laboratory but I would rather not hire the service should they not be still good. The results will be a function of both the quality of the negatives and the quality of the service. A sensible approach would be to start with a small test batch and see how they do. Even if they negatives have deteriorated ...


2

Archive requirements for film generally err on the cautious side. A couple of years ago I had all my colour negatives scanned. These spanned the period 1971-2003, and had been stored in a variety of places and conditions, many of them far from ideal. While I had a small percentage of failures, these tended to be physical damage to the frames, rather than ...


2

It certainly depends on quality of processing, film brand, gasses in the storage area and other factors, but in general, 10-15 years should not be a big deal. There may be some color shifts but it should be possible to fix them during or after scanning. Humidity may be a problem. Check the films for spots, stains etc.


2

These are from film size 620 / 120 --- both are the same film except the 120 sported a more robust film spool. As a rule of thumb, the 120 size fit the more expensive cameras and the 620 size the amateur cameras. These negatives are format 2 1/4 x 2 1/4. Likely they were shot using a twin's lens reflex . The camera was likely held at waist height.


2

According to CTEIN The typical color-negative paper can record about 65 line pairs per millimeter (lp/mm), but a black and white (B&W) paper can reach 125 lp/mm. Ilfochrome and R-3 papers fall midway between at 80 to 100 lp/mm... (Post Exposure, Second Edition 2011) To put this into perspective, CTEIN states later in the paragraph that paper ...


2

I have had negatives in archival sleeves made by Print File (the brand you link to) for decades. Just sitting in the sleeves will not cause scratches or produce residues. Scratches Scratches are created when a hard substance scrapes across the surface of the film. They can be formed in camera, during development, or when handling the film. Scratches may ...


2

I have used negative sleeves for years, and had no problem. The brand I use is Hama and not File Print, but that is because I live in Europe. One thing I learned was to use the so called parchment sleeved and not plastic based, because plastic can get statically charged and draws dust particles. Dust is my darkroom enemy #1. This method of storage has been ...


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