Episode #125 of the Stack Overflow podcast is here. We talk Tilde Club and mechanical keyboards. Listen now
32

Film negatives are only light-sensitive while in the camera, until they are removed and processed. The processing includes a step to "fix" the image so that the negatives will not be further exposed by light. So once processed, film negatives (and slides) can be handled in daylight.


21

In theory you can get more out of a negative than a print. However, in practice you are more likely to have access to a flat bed scanner that can give a wonderful scan from the print. A good film scanner is much more expensive and slower. Considerations are similar for larger format film. But the costs go up even more, since the consumer-level film ...


17

Its better to scan the original slide/negative as its better to reproduce from as close to the source as possible meaning quality of reproduction goes down in this order: The source (whatever it was you actually were shooting) The slide/negative or digital camera file A print of the photograph. It essentially comes down to every stage of recording ...


13

Yes, pretty much all image editing applications include Invert as a standard adjustment and will automatically apply it to the active selection (if there is one). Here are a couple of examples. Windows: Paint.NET Paint.NET is a great free image editor for Windows. Make a selection From the menu, pick Adjustments > Invert Colors Linux/Mac OS: Gimp Much ...


8

The originals were that. The originals. Obviously you tried to keep the negatives in a safe manner because the nitrates and films were very flammable, could being eaten by fungus, decolor, or all kind of things. Even in remastering on movies like Star Wars they went for the original negatives, which were in bad shape. In feature films after the original ...


8

You're be looking for the Sabatier Effect. Sabatier discovered that when a plate was exposed, developed, and washed but not fixed, it could be given a second exposure to light which would partially reverse the image when development was continued. The technique can be used on film or when printing but is more commonly used when printing as the effects ...


7

Once you have the negative you use an enlarger to create your prints. An enlarger has a head containing a bulb, a negative holder and a lens. The head is on a column attached to a base. You can raise the head away from the base to make the image larger (or turn the head to project the image onto a wall for large prints) If you want to do a contact sheet, ...


7

Processed film does deteriorate, but not at such a rate that surviving 10-15 years would be remarkable! It also depends on the type of film; black & white film lasts longer than colour film for example. (Indeed, when film studios want to store an old colour movie, they separate the colour film into its R, G and B channels, and record each channel ...


7

The C-41 negative film process arose from movie film that was marketed just after World War II. Previously, processing color films was a far more arduous task. To simplify, three dyes, cyan (blue-green), magenta (red-blue), and yellow are incorporated into the film during manufacture. The dyes in this film is incomplete. The three dyes are all missing the ...


6

It appears you have an intermittent light leak that is reaching the film while it is wound tightly on a spool, possibly the take up spool inside the camera. The distance between the bands in your sample and the differences in intensity look like the same event caused all three at a time when the area with the darkest band was on top and the areas with the ...


6

Soak in a tray or tube of water at room temperature. Add two teaspoons of Dawn dishwashing detergent per quart (liter). Soak for several hours and test the paper to film adherence. If not free, continue soaking. In time the film will release from the paper. Now wash the film for 10 minutes in running water at room temperature, follow with a 30 second dip in ...


5

The process involves the following steps: Remove the film from its roll(s), load it onto reels, and insert the reels into their tank. This must all be done in the dark. (Good to practice on some old ruined film so that you can learn to load the reels by touch.) Once the cover is on the tank, you can turn on the light. Pour developer solution into the tank, ...


5

Most photo editing software (though generally not raw processors like Lightroom) has the ability to select parts of an image and to perform operations on that selection, and most software has the ability to make a photo negative. If you want something freely available I suggest GIMP. Photoshop and Photoshop Elements will also do it but they cost money.


5

Talbot bathed paper sheets in a solution of silver nitrate and then potassium iodide. He then “washed” the paper with a mix of gallic acid and silver nitrate. The paper was then exposed in the camera. The exposed paper was bathed again in this wash solution he called “gallo-nitrate of silver”. He then fixed the image (rendered permanent), with a hot solution ...


4

Questions about the orange mask of the C-41 and earlier C-22 negative color film keep reoccurring. Maybe I can shine some light on this subject. As you know, black & white film photography generates an image by chemically depositing a layer of metallic silver on film. This silver laydown is in proportion to scene brightness. This film thus displays ...


4

If the TIFF files are only 8bit and the resolution is the same then there will be very little (unless the JPEG compression is set very high). The only difference will be slight artefacts in high frequency areas and potentially lower colour resolution if chroma sub-sampling is used on the JPEGs. Additionally if the scan resolution itself is high compared to ...


4

You can but the result will be poor. First of all you need to disable the lighting from below, otherwise what you will get will be the reflection of the surface. Second you need to light the negatives from behind with some source of light that is both known and homogeneous: you don't want to have one side of the negative brighter than the other one. Third ...


4

How was the cyan cast of C-41 negatives originally removed? By applying color correction filters during the enlarging/printing process. Normally a strong yellow filter and a more moderate magenta filter were used. Other ratios between the yellow and magenta filters were used for color correction. For example, if tungsten film was shot in daylight it would ...


4

Here are some differences between paper and film that will affect the image resolution acutance, resolution, and resolving power. Paper: The emulsion normally used for paper is relatively insensitive silver chloride in a colloidal suspension, orthochromatic (blue sensitive), thickly applied to a fibre base with a baryta layer for brightness and a starch ...


4

How important is the quality of the negative for Lightroom processing (Path A) versus conventional printing (Path B)? A good negative is a joy to work with. A bad negative must be salvaged, no matter which path you choose. If wet printing, you may find yourself tediously burning and dodging in order to milk just a tad more highlight detail from your nearly ...


3

The image looks like it could have been done in-camera, if the camera had a multiple exposure function. If the camera was tilted down for the first exposure, level for the middle exposure then tilted up for the last, you would achieve the stepped gradient effect we see here. The model looks to have been photographed against an evening sky (or sunset), and ...


3

I've been looking at the same challenge. Some 2000 glass plate negatives from Edwardian times. 1/2 plates at 120mm x 160mm with some degradation of the emulsion. A lightbox and my D200 with portrait/macro 60mm lens would be optimal, but too time-consuming - I'd be doing it to 2020 and beyond. I scan the image on a Epson V750, emulsion side down, at 2400dpi ...


3

As said here, the original source will always contain a better quality. But you also have to consider that, the negative is smaller and you need better equipment in order to capture that, with better resolution and better optics. Your scanner may be able to capture more than 2000dpi image, which will give you a lot of pixels even on a inch big negative. ...


3

I filter the orange cast of the color negatives via the light box so that the red channel on the D810 camera I use is not shifted and compressed using 3 sets of gels. My light box is powered with two SB700 flash units and a CFL bulb for focus and composition. I have described my setup twice on this forum before. Here are the gels I use. Cinegel #3202: Full ...


3

I know this is a bit late, but I just stumbled across your question. With the recent updates to Lightroom, you can now build a profile to invert negatives and in many cases no further processing will be needed. But even with a film inversion profile, the sliders are still reversed. I do not think this will ever change because Adobe have explained that ...


3

I asked B&H and they told me that it's standard 120 size film and recommended the Epson V600. Seems reasonable. Fingers crossed!


3

These are scans of old B&W photographs and I want to convert them to negatives for further photo printings. You don't need negatives to print any more. The best resolution you can possibly get at this stage, without recourse to the original prints or negatives, is the files you already have. Any print-shop can work from these. Take them to a local ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible