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I get reasonably good results photographing negatives with a slide copier attachment and a macro lens (vs using a flatbed scanner). However, if you plan to scan many frames of film, you should consider a dedicated film scanner with batch feeder. Depending on your lens and camera, image quality from a film scanner may or may not be better, but it would be ...


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Unless you are seeing something abnormal, all color negatives have a yellowish – orange cast. This includes the unexposed edges. This normal yellow – orange is called a “mask”. The reason for the yellow – orange mask: Color films depend on three dyes that form the color image. These are yellow – magenta (red + green) – cyan (blue + green). We can make a ...


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"Best" is a relative term, depending on your goal(s). :) If you want the most flexibility (control over relationships between density, contrast, shadow and highlight detail), scan the negative and manipulate it in post-processing. The higher bit-depth you can get, the better for smoother gradations if you'll be making big adjustments in post. If you're a ...


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Fast scanning + Accurate Colour Reproduction without having to post process + Even lighting of the image + $500 USD = :-) ...you must be dreaming, :-) depending of course on what you mean by 'speed' (the main problem) and 'accuracy'. The real option here is Imacon. You have some cheaper solutions in Ken Rockwell's How to Scan Your 3,000 Slide Archive . ...


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Not sure of your location, so can't really offer any specific stores/services, but developing/printing a roll of film is typically around $10-15 USD at a typical (chain/non-specialist-photo-lab) in the US. I'll bet you could negotiate a cheaper price with the manager of a specific store for 100 rolls at once. Prices usually include developing, so it may be ...


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You can but the result will be poor. First of all you need to disable the lighting from below, otherwise what you will get will be the reflection of the surface. Second you need to light the negatives from behind with some source of light that is both known and homogeneous: you don't want to have one side of the negative brighter than the other one. Third ...


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The Nikon scanners do not require regular maintenance. They are however quite prone to dirt and dust. Your best bet keeping the scanner running problem free for a long time is to store it in a clean place (wrapped in a cover) when not in use. Some units are also starting to show signs of age and may e.g. have problems with the lubrication drying out. They ...


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The major quality-determining components of film scanners are similar to those of camera systems – lenses and sensors. Better components are more expensive. Keep in mind that the "scanners" you're considering are the low-end point-and-shoots of the film scanning world. If that is all you need and expect, you may find them to be more than "passably good". ...


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Simply put: No. You don't really need to worry about dynamic range if you are planning to scan ordinary color negatives. A scanner's Dmax becomes a limiting factor only when scanning high-density transparency material like color-reversal films. In order to tell you why I have to clarify a couple of concepts. Film Density As you expose and develop a film, ...


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This kind of issue is usually given by some dust in the calibration area in the top of scanner plate. A first try you can do to confirm it is to try to clean carefully that part and see if there is some change in the stripes pattern. It shouldn't be cable related because the data are digitally transmitted and loosing of data didn't produce this effect but ...


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dpi is about the inches... pixels per inch. 4500x3000 pixels at 3200 dpi is 1.4 x 0.94 inches, on the film. 4500x3000 pixels at 360 dpi is 12.5 x 8.33 inches, on the print paper. The spacing and size of the printed pixels. It should have shown the inch dimensions too. This is simple division.... 4500 pixels / 360 dpi = 12.5 inches. Exactly the same ...


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You will be much happier if scanning slides with it than if scanning color negatives. This inexpensive type will have a tiny compact-camera style sensor and an inexpensive lens (whereas a DSLR camera will have a much larger sensor and maybe a $600 macro lens, which will of course be better). Hopefully the lens is adequate, but even this inexpensive camera ...


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This is explained here but unless you really insist on building your own, I suggest you buy a slide-scanning attachment which is quite cheap. In either case you need a close-focusing lens. If you have a macro lens, then use it. Otherwise you will have to get macro focusing using another macro technique such as extension tubes. You will also need an even ...


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I would stay away from using the word "always" as exceptions certainly exist. I would assume that the quality of scanners in most shops is much higher quality then your basic negative scanner, but why don't you just ask them what quality the scans are? Most shops that are legitimate have different levels of scans depending all on what you want(and price of ...


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Yes, the minilab scanners do (such as Fuji Frontier and Noritsu). An older one with acceptable resolution and speed can be had for around 3k. There are online vendors specialized in recycling and reselling these machines (see here). I haven't heard of any consumer level scanner with this feature. But even if there is, it doesn't solve much of a problem for ...


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Usually, when scanning film or slides, one uses a scanner that has a built-in backlight, illuminating the film from behind, thus overcoming exactly the problems you describe. Therefore, in order to use "regular" scanners as film scanners, one has to provide backlighting in some way. Here are several things people have tried: Build a "mirrorbox" from ...


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Because the streaks are all in a perfect vertical orientation my bet is that the scanner is to blame. While it's possible for streaks to happen while processing the negatives I feel that's pretty unlikely to result in the same thing. And it won't be the camera. Possibly the scanner was not properly cleaned or maintained. The only way to be sure is to ...


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https://helpx.adobe.com/photoshop/using/blending-modes.html Divide Looks at the color information in each channel and divides the blend color from the base color. https://helpx.adobe.com/photoshop/using/channel-calculations.html Channel Calculations The calculation commands perform mathematical operations on the corresponding pixels of two ...


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The results you will get are simply very bad. Pro-am scanners don’t go below $900 and lately you will have to shell another $200 to get the license that allows the full functionality of the software. The cheapest used pro scanners, if you find them because they are not manufactured anymore, will set you back a minimum of $5000 and another $1000 for one ...


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Green tint is from poor scan job but the fog is because negatives were underexposed. The picture of the film on the light table does not look underexposed. Except perhaps one frame. Green fog comes from light leaks in the camera. All my other films done with the same camera don't have this problem. Light leaks usually aren't uniform across the ...


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Some things to try to troubleshoot the problem… The colour of the film base, if not corrected accurately, could shift the colour of the scans in a consistent way toward green for all the shots on the roll regardless of the density of individual images. The exposure looks useable to me. Look closely at the edge numbering of the film. The exposure of that ...


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There are many ways to accomplish this task ranging from the tried-and-true xTF to new and novel deep learning techniques. Here is a simple and accessible way to evaluate focus. This technique is best used when imaging mono-planar content-rich subjects. Scanned negatives definitely meet the former criteria and I recommend setting focus with a negative frame ...


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ShutterFreak, Here's the complete Fuji Professional Film Data Guide, as supplied by FujiFilm Americas in Brazil: http://en.fujifilmamericas.com.br/shared/bin/ProfessionalFilmDataGuide.pdf (the PDF linked above is section 1-3) Are you able to read the edge markings on the film? In the file, zoom in with your PDF viewer. You'll see that the film type is ...


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After a lot of trouble shooting I came to the conclusion that there where a conflict between the Plustek Opticfilm 8200i negative scanner and the Samsung C460W printer driver. When I killed the CDAServer (CDASrv.exe) process the scanner just started working as normal. CDAServer is a part of "Samsung Easy Printer Manager" and does not need to run all the time ...


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Although I never personally needed to do this, I found pretty fast on the internet guides on how to do it How to scan film Kodak guide Video guide on Youtube Bottomline what those guides are saying is: first thing you want to try is a cloth (those special cloths used for photographic works) you HAVE to use gloves while handling the film. some guides are ...


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