26

This photo is taken with a petzval lens which corrects all aberrations decently except for, well, petzval aka field curvature. Because the edges are in focus at a further distance, the blur is smaller there. Because the lens is fairly highly vignetted, the lens also effectively has a larger f number towards the edges, again reducing the blur. The result ...


25

What you are looking for is a ND (Neutral Density) filter. To illustrate, here is an example of a photo taken in daylight in a street with a ND1000 filter. The filter allowed a shutter speed of 6 seconds. With no filter, with the same aperture and ISO, the shutter speed would have been approximately 6/1000 = 0.006 seconds (no "ghosts" effect). Contrary to ...


22

Easiest way to do this: Take a picture of your hand in front of the screen (framed larger than the screen) Download the image to your computer, set as wallpaper Drag a Notepad window where you need it Take another photo of the screen contents (framed tighter than screen borders), or just take a screenshot (note that Windows tends to hide mouse cursor from ...


15

It looks to me like they dragged the shutter. That is they set the shutter speed to something longish, but then used a flash. The model is illuminated by the flash with the camera still. Then after the flash has finished, the camera is rotated around the frame's center causing lights in the background to form the radially blurred pattern you see. The model ...


14

Apart from using an ND filter, you might be able to achieve the desired effect by taking multiple photos and then blending them in post processing. Either an automatic blend with "ghost removal" might work, or layering the images and manually masking/unmasking selectively (in effect "painting out" the people). All of this pretty much requires a tripod for ...


14

I would not worry overmuch about the color schemes. Two reasons: the emulsions you mention (Bergger and HP5+) are panchromatic, in both cases with rather decent color rendition your scenes will be static, so if and when you decide to alter the color rendition you can do so with classical B&W filters (the classical sequence of light yellow, dark ...


13

I'm the photographer, who made the picture, and I used Photoshop to make the strings invisible holding the lenses. This is not a composite. The picture was made from 1 shot. The CE logo on the lens confuses people, because it looks like it's upside down, but actually it's reflected from a mirror.


12

The Redmi 6A uses the Sony Exmor IMX486 sensor, which is a 1/2.9" format sensor. Note that "1/2.9 inch" is merely a name, not its diagonal dimension (see: Why is a 1" sensor actually 13.2 × 8.8mm?). The IMX486 has a 5.04 mm × 3.77 mm sensor, corresponding to a crop factor of about 6.9×. The camera's focal length is about 3.8 mm (...


11

Find or create the silhouette profile image. You can find tutorials online about this by searching for "silhouette," "profile," etc. I'm being vague about this because there are lots of ways to do it. This is not the appropriate forum for listing all of the possible ways. I went out and grabbed this image: Then turned it into a silhouette: Load both the ...


10

Slow shutter time Short duration flash Rotate the camera around the optical axis of the lens The dancer is only lit by the very short flash burst, the background is lit by continuous ambient lighting for the much longer exposure time as the camera is being rotated around the lens' optical axis. Slow Shutter I'd start somewhere in the neighborhood of 1/15-1/...


9

This is a swirl-y bokeh, an often desirable flaw commonly found in some vintage lenses and lenses. There are some lenses known for this this characteristic, most notably the soviet made Zenit Helios 40-2 85mm F1.5 which is still being manufactured. You can find this lens on ebay for ~$600. If you are adventures enough you can convert the Cyclop night vision ...


9

It's hard to tell what you're looking for based on a brief description and just two examples. Here's an image that was taken on a FujiFilm X-E2 at ISO 200, 1/350s, with an XC 50-230/4.5-6.7 OIS-II lens at 230mm F6.7. No special processing before uploading, though Imgur may do some processing that is out of my control. If it illustrates what you are seeking,...


7

Photoshop has certainly been used somewhere along the line. Either the 'floating' lenses and flashgun were photographed separately in the same lighting conditions and then composited into the main shot, or the photographer used string or fishing line to suspend them somehow and then Photoshopped it out.


7

There are a number of factors here, two of which you've identified: a yellow color cast shallow depth of field, possibly with additional post-processing blur These are important, but part of the dream-like appearance comes from the high key. Here's the histogram for the image: which shows that all of the tones in this image are brighter than the 50% mark, ...


7

If you have a fast lens, create a circular cover over it, and it should swirl the background. It's best seen with foliage.


7

Just to add a bit of links to the other (good) answers, if you do not want to use a ND filter, you can use multiple exposure and use an averaging method to simulate a long exposure --- basically, 20 exposures at 1/10 of seconds will be more or less equivalent to a 2 seconds exposures, or use a median filter, which can even be better --- in the right ...


6

You will need to introduce noise, selectively desaturate come colors, decrease contrast, lighten the black point and possibly selectively shift hues on some colors. Reducing the color depth may also help achieve a vintage look. In general, the "vintage" look comes from the fact that older films lacked the sensitivity and color accuracy of more modern films ...


6

No. Effects are almost all irreversible. This is because the vast majority of them remove details, gradations and color. Sketch look removes color-variations as do most types of painterly, pop art, etc effects, depending on the camera. Even something like the miniature effect blurs details out of most of the image which makes them unrecoverable. Now as @...


6

No, you can't do it without postprocessing, but a similar, purely photographic effect, can be achieved by the clever use of flash. See the following questions: When should you use a normal flash vs a second-curtain flash? How does dragging the shutter work? How to motion-blur the background while keeping the subject well exposed and in focus?


5

Where you shooting in RAW or RAW+JPEG mode? (assuming you can even shoot RAW with the effects mode enabled). If so, then it will just be a matter of re-processing the RAW file. If not, the answer is almost certainly "no" - it may be possible to "undo" some of the effect via Photoshop or your other favourite image editor, but it's almost certainly more ...


5

I have never tried the following trick myself, but it seems to be a simple and very cheap alternative to buying yet another lens (yes, it's even cheaper than the Helios 44-2): Take a piece of light-proof paper, cut a hole in it. Attach it to the lens hood and put hood on lens. Swirly bokeh! See PetaPixel: Homemade Petzval Swirl Bokeh with a 50mm Lens. The ...


5

Keeping this simple: In Adobe Lightroom, the sliders for noise reduction give the smooth plasticy look. The luminance noise slider creates the effect far more than does the slider for damping chromatic noise. Warning: the smoothing effect can easily be overdone, so be judicious with it. It's most creepy when overdone on people; you can get away with a bit ...


4

This is not as simple as an "effect." Something like this absolutely is possible, but it takes a lot of work before and after pressing the shutter. Taking the picture: The key part of the look, from a technical perspective, is the light. In 3D renderings, light can come from anywhere, from a source any size, and in any color, so renderings like these ...


4

The application is Adobe Photoshop. See this article on artist Sara Shakeel where this is mentioned. In another article she notes that a digital work like this "only takes a few hours".


4

If you have control of the lighting you can. Shoot in a relatively dark environment and use a relatively long exposure time combined with second curtain sync, often called dragging the shutter. Normally the flash fires as soon as the shutter opens. That's called front curtain or first curtain sync. Second curtain (or rear curtain) sync delays the flash ...


3

You probably need a 3D modeling tool that can emit flames and smoke. That fire is actually more smoke-y than fire. Then create a rough sketch of the model, and simulate the burning. Now, the more realistic your simulator is, the better it will look, obviously. The best simulators use very complex fluid simulation to achieve good results. E.g. see this ...


3

Perhaps the linked article was changed after the question was posed here, but the caption under the image states, Wasiczek’s backgrounds are as interesting as her flowers. Here, she employs her mirror lens’ distinctive donut-shaped bokeh. Shot with the Nikon D300 and a Rubinar 300mm f/4.5 mirror lens. A catadioptric, or mirror, lens essentially acts as ...


3

Essentially, mattdm's answer is correct. In addition, to the half-refelctive mirror, they used a tight, dimmable light to control when/how bright the eye reflections would appear. Ridley himself discusses how they did it here: https://youtu.be/IpzFOHEO8Sc


3

Here is the tutorial: Watch on YouTube. Got it from this Flickr page. In a nutshell: Move all your icons off screen. Take a photo of your hand in front of the screen, making sure that you leave space around the edge of the monitor. Set the image as the background. Put all the icons back. Put a window (such as notepad) over your hand. Take another photo, ...


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