16

Strictly speaking, image stabilization (IS) is not a necessary feature for any lens. For the vast majority of the history of photography IS as we refer to it did not exist. Plenty of remarkable photos were taken in spite of the lack of IS. The ultimate method for camera/lens stabilization will always be a stable tripod with a quality head attached and a way ...


16

When a field of view is described as 120°, that refers to the total angle. So, 60° to the left of center and 60° to the right. Most camera lenses show a very restricted subset of the field of view perceived by the human eye and vision system. It is probably the case that the system is measured across the diagonal from corner-to-corner of a rectangle, ...


13

The advice you read is an example of the phrase, "A little knowledge can be a dangerous thing." There are filters known as Variable ND filters that are basically two polarizer filters stacked on top of each other. As the axis of polarization is altered between the two polarizer filters the total amount of light allowed through will vary. If an ND filter is ...


12

It's not so much a defect as a property of wide-angle lenses: they distort things on the sides. This distortion is why they are not recommended for portraiture. Of course, the very same distortion is what gives wide-angle its power, making it great for photographing interiors (making them look larger) or when going for an "artsy" effect.


12

What would I have to do to take such photos from a 50mm lens of a Dx camera? You can't take those pictures with a 50mm lens and a DX (1.5X APS-C) camera. To fit all of what an 11mm lens will give you you'd have to back up five times as far. But that would change the perspective, or distance relationships between the various parts of the scene. To get those ...


11

Canon EF-S 10-18 or Tokina 11-16/2.8. :D Sorry. Neither one of these is ideal on a crop body as a landscape lens. The fisheye has too much distortion and would require defishing if you ever wanted a straight horizon anywhere other than the center of the frame. And defishing will cost you the edges of the frame, so it won't be super-super-wide (which is why ...


10

Distortion caused by a lens's optics would give you barrel distortion (objects appear to bulge outward) or pincushion distortion (squishing inward). The skewed lines you are observing are straight; this is perspective distortion, and is not a problem caused by the lens nor fixable with better optics (you can fix it with a tilt-shift lens, but that's a ...


10

This is simply where the market is converging to at the moment. The typical kit lens is still 18-55mm on an APS-C sensor but most people find wider angle more useful, so some manufacturers made a few lens that start at 16mm. Olympus still sells many of their entry-level cameras with a 14-42mm which is equivalent to 28mm, while the 18-55mm mentioned earlier ...


9

You would need a step-down adapter, such as this with a 55mm thread into your kit lens, then a 52mm thread for the wide-angle converter. Unfortunately... you will very quickly discover that these wide-angle adapters are not worth the money, however tempting they may appear. I'm certain their entire purpose in life is to teach poor unsuspecting newbie ...


8

Graduated ND filters are usable with wide angle lenses. They should be big enough to cover the complete field of vision. There are certain wide angle lenses that have a protruding front element that make it difficult to use regular filters (Nikon 14-24 2.8). Polarizer filters are not recommended for wide angle lenses, because the bigger field of view may ...


7

Rather than considering a whole new camera, as the S95 is a rather nice little thing, you could chuck a small tripod in your backpack for these shots. This would allow you to compose you shot with your wife and use the self timer for the photo. Gorillapods are tiny enough to go in your pocket and can grip onto benches, railings, or branches or you could ...


7

Because "wide", "fast" and "low-priced" don't ever go together. The Canon lenses are low-priced because they're pancake lenses and not particularly wide on the format it was designed for, nor particularly fast (for primes). Similar to the (very old) Nikkor 45/2.8 P. I would suggest looking at 3rd-party f/2.8 17-50ish lenses. Or the Sigma 28/1.8. Or, if you'...


6

You're getting what is called Perspective distortion which is most noticable in wide angle lenses. Check out this link for more info: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Perspective_distortion_(photography) Basically close up objects in the center of the frame will look enlarged while objects on the sides will be stretched away from the center of the photo.


6

Two things common to Wide angle lenses can do this, barrel distortion and perspective distortion. For barrel distortion, when pulling in a very wide amount of information from off axis, light gets distorted based on how extreme of an angle it is coming in at because the lens can't completely correct for how far off the lens axis the light is. On the ...


6

Any EF lens can be used on one of Canon's full-frame cameras. Generally, when Canon makes a newer version of a lens, it's because there can either be improvements to the optical design, or they can make a cheaper version of the lens. With Ls, it's usually the former. The Mk I version of the 14L came out in 1991. The Mk II version in 2007, so you ...


6

When looking for a wide angle lens you should consider a few very important things: Focal length Image Quality Maximum Aperture Focus modes (AF/MF) Filter compatibility Feature set (FTM, IS, USM, etc.) Mount Weight, size, cost, etc. Intended usage Distortion & Projection Flare resistance Most of the above is not uniquely important to wide angle lenses, ...


6

Probably not. The Rokinon/Bower/Samyang/whatever else it is being marketed as this week 14mm f/2.8 is a manual focus lens. That makes it difficult to use for photographing action. And while it is true that before the late 1980s pretty much all lenses were manually focused, it took many folks a lot of practice and years of experience to get highly proficient ...


6

First, some terminology. On your 700D (or any of the 1.6x crop APS-C bodies), a 15mm and up is still just "wide angle". It's below 15mm that lenses become ultrawide. So if you want ultrawide, you need lenses that are around the 10-15mm focal length range. Wide angle on a 1.6x crop camera, typically means something in the 15-24mm range. Normal is around 28-...


5

I have the 14mm and use it with a T3i (still a crop body). I like it for what I get but I wouldn't consider it the best option. If time is not of the essence, I would recommend this: Canon EF-S 10-18mm f/4.5-5.6 IS STM Lens. It's only preorder at the moment, as this lens hasn't been released yet. It would, however, leave you with a lot more options than ...


5

Have you considered the new EF-S 10-18mm f/4-5.6 STM ultrawide zoom for crop? Its MSRP is US$299, so it's about half the price of the EF-S 10-22. Sorry, but due to the crop factor, you're not going to find an ultrawide for full frame that also performs as an ultrawide for crop, and definitely not one for $500 or less. To me, this would be a far better ...


5

What you get with stitching is increased resolution, more control over the projection used, and possibly some artifacts if something moves or the light changes. If you want to simulate what you'd get with a wider lens then you should use the rectilinear projection. You will get the same proportions of near and far objects. You will get reduced depth of ...


5

Without the 70D, you cannot print that image that little bit larger. Without the 10-18mm, you cannot get that image at all. Remember: This does not hold true in general. The 70D might as well be the key equipment required to get a certain shot, but that shot will not be a landscape shot.


5

The issue is that with some ND filters and all polarizing filters, the light dropoff is not even as the angle of the light passing through the filter changes. This obviously is more pronounced as the lens angle is wider. So you get an uneven banding throughout the image. The secondary issue is that a really wide angle lens cannot use a filter without ...


5

My gut says to me that this is one of those questions where if you have to ask, it isn't a gear problem. When you need a wider and lens you will start to feel it. For example this shot It was a tight space, with a Nikon D7100 and a 18-55mm lens, shot at 18mm. There are certainly technical problems with the image, but I would have loved to have been able to ...


5

Why is zoom provided in Tokina 11-16mm? Tokina has specialized in zooms. The reputation of their AT-X lenses is basically built upon their acquisition of highly-regarded zoom technology from Angénieux. Their current lens lineup includes: Six primes: 20mm x2, 50mm, 100mm x2, 300mm. Fifteen zooms. Like their primes, many of their zooms duplicate the same ...


5

If using it on the same camera yes. As long as the sensor size remains fixed the angle of view is determined by the focal length. And 18 is lower than 24 so it is wider.


4

A lot depends on which 24-70mm f/2.8 lens you are comparing to the EF 24-105mm f/4 L IS. There are three very good 24-70mm f/2.8 lenses you could consider: Canon EF 24-70mm f/2.8 L II This lens is the most expensive at a little over $2,000 U.S., but is the sharpest from 24mm all the way to 70mm at f/2.8. At the wide end where you want to use it there isn't ...


4

For landscape photography the advantage of most prime lenses over kit zooms is not the maximum aperture, it is the sharper image it can produce at middle apertures (i.e. f/4-f/8) and better performance in the areas of distortion, vignetting, and chromatic aberration. While you can correct for those in post, you do so at a price of maximum sharpness. ...


4

Like all things in life, you need to make a choice: The TV or the girl(s)? Also, consider how something polar, like the earth is displayed as a flat map? How warped is that?


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